Revisiting the Magical Splendor of the Ballroom: Hoopla Train

 

Darcey Engen ’88

Sod House Theater, which was founded by Augsburg alumni co-artistic directors Darcey Engen ’88 and Luverne Seifert ’83 who are also husband and wife, presents “Hoopla Train” with Yard Master Yip and his Polkastra starting on September 21 through October 15. “Hoopla Train” is an event performed in old vaudevillian tradition with live music, singing and sketch comedy and is a show that welcomes the whole family. Dancing, with music provided by the Chmielewski Funtime Band, will be encouraged throughout the show, and free dance

Luverne Seifert ’83

lessons are offered one hour prior to the show time. Along with this, there will be a live talent show contest for audience members and prizes will be given out.

“We are interested in bringing the young and old back into the ballroom to revisit its magical splendor and its power in building community,” said Darcey Engen, “We were enthralled with the polka and waltz dancers of greater Minnesota, and witnessed a passionate commitment to this kind of community engagement. We are thrilled to bring “Hoopla Train” to the Twin Cities.” “Hoopla Train” has been performed previously in 14 historic ballrooms and dance halls across Minnesota.

The cast stars Darcey Engen, Elise Langer, Jim Lichtscheidl, Eriq Nelson, Kimberly Richardson, Luverne Seifert, Andrea Wollenberg and the Chmielewski Funtime Band. Tickets for “Hoopla Train” are $20 for adults; $10 for children, students and seniors and can be purchased at www.sodhousetheater.org or 612-414-2032.

Did You Know? Alumni Behind The Science Building- Fridlund

Week 4: Paul and Maxine Fridlund

Paul and his wife Maxine Fridlund were important donors to “Old Science Hall”.Paul graduated from Augsburg College with a degree in Chemistry in 1942 and then served four years at sea during World War II as a lieutenant with the U.S. Navy. After his service, Paul returned to education and received his Master of Science in 1952 shortly followed by his Doctorate of Philosophy in 1954, both from the University of Minnesota. He achieved distinction throughout his career and research in plant pathology, which included international work and travel to many countries such as South Africa, Australia, and Romania.  He was a long time faculty member at Washington State University and later in life he used his location to his advantage by writing several historical books about Prosser, Washington where he lived  when he sadly passed away in 2000.

As donors to Augsburg College, Paul and Maxine not only started a scholarship endowment for biology majors, but Paul’s financial gift and gift of equipment to the biology department gave students a unique opportunity to pursue and study plant biology at an earlier stage in their academic careers than most other biology students. A plaque honoring this financial contribution to Old Science is still standing and is located near room 214. Paul eventually received Augsburg’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 1980 in recognition of significant achievement in his vocation, for outstanding contribution to church and community, and for a life that exemplified both the ideals and mission of Augsburg College. While the records don’t show much about Maxine’s accomplishments, we remember them both today for their generosity.

If you are interested in more of Paul Fridlund’s work with plant biology, he also edited a book called “Virus and viruslike diseases of pome fruits and simulating noninfectious disorders” which you can learn more about here.

Did You Know? Alumni Behind the Science Building – Arnold

WEEK 3: LUTHER A. and clarette arnold

Luther A. and Clarette (Jorenby) Arnold were Augsburg graduates from the class of 1929 and donors to the “Old Science” Building. Today, we remember them with a plaque outside Science 108, but they also gave generously to the college, including significant gifts to the Augsburg Fund, the Foss Center (where the atrium is named after them) and the Lindell Library.

We have little information regarding Clarette’s career, but we know her hobbies included reading, writing, travelling and music. After the couple married in 1928, they both graduated from Augsburg in 1929 and started their lives together.  Luther then went on to receive a Masters in Philosophy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and later his Doctorate from the University of Florida-Gainesville. His career spanned science teaching and science education from public schools to the university level, where he was a Chemistry professor and instructor of sciences at the University of Florida.

Outside academia he was the first executive secretary emeritus of the Executive Committee of the Florida Foundation for Future Scientists, served on the board of directors for the International Fair, and was an adviser for the World Science Fair. They were members of Zumbro Lutheran Church and were married for 65 years.

We’re Hiring: Temporary Annual Giving Assistant (Give to the Max Day)

Job Description

Institutional Advancement are hiring a Temporary Annual Giving Assistant to help out with Give to the Max Day. This position will be working alongside the Senior Director of Advancement, Advancement Communications Specialist and the Give to the Max Day fundraising project managers to make this Give to the Max Day our best one yet.

The position will involve:

  • Orchestrating one-on-one interviews with Augsburg faculty, staff and student leaders.
  • Serving as lead project coordinator for up to 20 projects.
  • Completing necessary marketing collateral for projects including website registration and design.
  • Editing and sending email and mail copy.
  • Setting fundraising goals for individual projects.
  • Manipulating spreadsheets with donor data.
  • Assisting in the planning and execution of donor recognition events in coordination with various project managers.

Think that you would make a great Annual Giving Assistant? You can apply here.

Required Qualifications

  • Minimum Associate’s degree required; Bachelor’s degree preferred
  • 1-2 years of administrative assistant or coordinator experience
  • Prior project management experience
  • Experience with website management/maintenance
  • Demonstrated competence in using multiple social media platforms to engage audiences, specifically Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn
  • Previous fundraising experience strongly preferred.

 

 

Did You Know? Alumni Behind the Science Building – Sverdrup

Week 2: Leif Johan and Johan N. Sverdrup

Leif Johan Sverdrup posing for a portrait in his uniform.
Leif Johan Sverdrup.

Leif Johan Sverdrup and his son Johan N. Sverdrup left their mark on Augsburg in “Old Science” Hall.  Leif who was also known as Jack, was born on January 11, 1898, in Norway and he emigrated to the U.S. in 1914 to live with relatives. He started attending Augsburg in 1916 and graduated in May 1918 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. After his graduation, he served in the army in WWI.

Leif Johan Sverdrup eventually returned to education after  he finished his military service and earned a  civil engineering degree from the University of Minnesota in 1921. After completing his engineering degree, Leif Johan went into business with his University of Minnesota professor John Ira Parcel, and together founded Sverdrup and Parcel (a civil engineering firm specializing in bridge construction).

His career eventually led him to rejoin the army and eventually (between the years 1942-1958) he led engineering construction projects in Europe.

In the 1990’s his son, Johan N. Sverdrup, gave financially to establish the Johan N. Sverdrup Ozone Photophysics Laboratory, the Sverdrup Advanced Physics Laboratory, and the General Leif J. Sverdrup Visiting Scientist Program in honor of his father. These plaques are situated in the basement of “Old Science” Hall.

Picture of a plaque situated outside the Johan N. Sverdrup Ozone Photophysics Laboratory
Plaque outside the Johan N. Sverdrup Ozone Photophysics Laboratory.

 

Did You Know? Alumni Behind the Science Building

Introduction: “Old Science” Hall

One of the current physical centerpieces of the campus, Science Hall, was constructed in 1947-1948 and opened for fall semester classes in 1949. Like the new Hagfors Center, which will realign how the campus is used, this multi-functional building became a hub, not only for science classrooms, laboratories, and lecture halls, but also for campus life.

It was home to administrative officeBlack and white photo of Old Science Hall.s, faculty offices, the student lounge, student org offices, the home economics department, and a prayer chapel on the fourth floor. Originally a library was envisioned as a part of this capital project, but was built separately years later. The Lisa Odland Observatory, which was constructed on the roof and accessed by an exterior stairway, was added in 1960.  The building cost $450,000 and was supported by Lutheran Free Church members, as well as alumni and other friends.  It was reported that part way through the fundraising campaign, 350 students gave a total of $3,611, towards their overall goal of $6,000. Alumni who gave financially to make this building an integral part of the Augsburg experience include Luther A. ’29 and Clarette (Jorenby) ’29 Arnold, Paul R. ’42 and Maxine Fridlund, Lisa Odland, Johan N. Sverdrup, and General Leif J. Sverdrup ’18.

As we eagerly await the grand opening of the Hagfors Center, this series we will pay homage to the important people who made the original science hall a possibly. In “Did you know? Alumni behind the Science Building” we will explore each week specific generous donors of “Old Science” Hall, and highlight the importance of the building to Augsburg College.