Fall Book Group – America’s Original Sin

CCV Fall Book Group – America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America

UPDATE: The book group is now full, and there are no more free books available.

In connection to the September 20 Bernhard M. Christensen Symposium, faculty and staff are invited to participate in a book group discussion of America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America by Jim Wallis. The group will be co-led by Martha E. Stortz, Bernhard M. Christensen Professor of Religion and Vocation, and David Hamilton, Director of Operations and Global Inclusion, CGEE.

The Book Group will meet for brown bag lunch discussion in the Riverside Room from 11:30am-12:30pm on Sept. 7 and Sept. 28.

To receive a free copy of the book, please be sure the dates work for your schedule. Sign up by emailing ccv@augsburg.edu. Once registered, you may pick up the book in Oren Gateway 106.

Religion at Augsburg – New Faculty Series

Religion at Augsburg 

Presentation by Pastor Sonja Hagander and Marty Stortz, Professor of Religion

Wednesday, November 11, 12:15-1:15 pm,

Find out how Augsburg’s origins as a seminary in a specific Christian tradition lay the foundations for a rich appreciation of religious and non-religious diversity. All faculty and staff are invited to this next session in the New Faculty Orientation Series brought to you by the Center for Teaching and Learning and the Christensen Center for Vocation.

All are welcome to this brown bag session in the Campus Ministry Seminar Room (Foss 110) – bring your lunch and join us!

Fall Book Group – Darling

CCV Fall Book Group – Darling

Update – as of 9/1/2015, the spots for the book group are full.

In connection to the September 30 Bernhard M. Christensen Symposium/Humanities and Fine Arts Convocation, faculty and staff are invited to participate in a book group discussion of Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography by Richard Rodriguez. The group will be led by Martha E. Stortz, Bernhard M. Christensen Professor of Religion and Vocation.

The Book Group will meet for brown bag lunch discussion from 11:30am-12:30pm on the following Wednesdays:

Sept. 9
Sept. 16

To sign up, please email ccv@augsburg.edu

Once registered, a free copy of the book is available for pick up in Oren Gateway 106.

CCV Advisory Book and Movie Recommendations

Movie and Book Recommendations from the CCV Advisory Board

At our recent winter meeting we solicited names of movies and books that come highly recommended by the members of the Board.  Here is the list:

Melissa Pohlman:
Disunity in Christ: Uncovering the Hidden Forces That Keep Us Apart by Christena Cleveland

John Snider:
Eager to Love: The Alternative Way of Francis of Assisi by Richard Rohr

Mark Hanson:
Never Wholly Other: A Muslima Theology of Religious Pluralism  by Jerusha Tanner-Lamptey
A Strange Glory: The Life of Dietrich Bonhoeffer by Charles Marsh

Marty Stortz:
David Foster Wallace’s commencement address (2005) at Kenyon College
Christoph Schwoebel’s article “Talking Over the Fence.  From Toleration to Dialogue” (for John Clayton on his 60th Birthday), in: NZSTh 45 (2003), 115-130.

Sonja Hagander:
The Round House by Louise Erdrich

Diane Jacobson:
The film “Sweet Land”— suggested given disagreements about immigration.

Jack Fortin:
Christianity for the Rest of Us by Diana Butler Bass

 

What’s in a Name? A Christian Reflection on Current Events

On January 28, 2015, Martha E. Stortz’s chapel talk at  Augsburg College connected current events of Charlie Hebdo and Ferguson with the naming that Jesus does in the Sermon on the Mount: Light. Salt.

Her timely reflection is available electronically – What’s In a Name?

 

Opportunity to be a Christensen Scholar for 2015-16

snapshot for websiteAuggies ask Big Questions: What are yours? 

The 2015-2016 Christensen Scholars Seminar explores the Big Questions, the ones that keep you awake at night, that urge you to march, that press you into conversation with strangers, that prompt you to notice injustice.

As a college in the Christian tradition, Augsburg takes religion seriously.  We regard it as a subject of critical inquiry, even as we respect its practice as a faith.  As a college in the Lutheran tradition, Augsburg uses vocation as a way of engaging Big Questions.  Vocation is a full-bore, full-body experience.

Led by Professor Martha E. Stortz, the scholars will use a four-fold strategy to address those questions:

theological reflection, the head-trip part of the seminar, involving reading, writing, and critical thinking about vocation;

spiritual engagement, the heart of our work, a reflective component;

social action, hands-on work in the community;

everyday experience, as we learn our immediate context.

The Christensen Scholars earn upper level religion credit, receive a $2000 tuition scholarship, and meet every Thursday evening throughout the academic year beginning at 6pm, alternating class discussion with work in the shelter. We’ll touch base with the Interfaith Scholars at several points during the year.

An overview with further details about the program is available on our website. Please take a look and consider applying by February 5.

The application process is available on the Christensen Scholars website.

 

Lives Explored Videos

Martha E. Stortz (Bernhard M. Christensen Professor of Religion and Vocation) and Jack Fortin (CCV Senior Fellow) work with the Collegeville Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research on special vocation-related programs.

The Collegeville Institute has created a helpful video resource for personal and/or small group reflections. “Vocation is the story of our lives: how God calls and how we respond. Lives Explored is a video narrative project started in 2012 to capture stories of vocation from participants in the Called to Life and Called to Work programs.”

View the Lives Explored videos and enjoy these everyday examples of vocation in people’s life and work.

 

 

Vocation as Path: Following the Questions

On October 28, Augsburg College hosted Seminary and Divinity School Day, an event for regional college students to connect, reflect, and explore theological graduate study options with representatives from 18 top-notch seminaries and divinity schools.

Martha E. Stortz, Bernhard M. Christensen Professor of Religion and Vocation, gave the keynote address at the event.

Her message includes several Big Questions for reflection, and is available electronically – Vocation as Path: Following the Questions 

CCV Fall Book Group

Pastrix

In connection to the Oct. 1 Bernhard M. Christensen Symposium, faculty and staff are invited to participate in a series of discussions on the New York Times Bestseller Pastrix by Nadia Bolz-Weber. The group will be led by Martha E. Stortz, Bernhard M. Christensen Professor of Religion and Vocation.

The Book Group will meet in Foss 175 from 4-5:30pm on the following Mondays:

Sept. 8
Sept. 22
Oct. 6
Oct. 20

To sign up, please email ccv@augsburg.edu

Once registered, a free copy of the book is available for pick up in Oren Gateway 106.