Class of 2013

Grad-pic

Congratulations to our graduating class of 2013! In picture (from left):  Kevin Schultz, Krysten Wallace, Jessica Geisinger, Joe Buchman, Nate Freshour, Amy Balto, Chad Gilmer, Walker Glasoe,  Alex Sorum, Samia Hassan (not pictured: Sandra Hinz, Peter Schmidt, Will Matchett, Amal Farah, and Ali Wolfe)

Congratulations to our recent graduates who have been admitted to graduate programs:

  • Amy Balto (’13): Oregon State University — MS in Food Science
  • Joe Buchman (’13):  University of Minnesota — PhD in Chemistry
  • Walker Glasoe (’13):  Oregon State University — PhD in Chemistry
  • Chad Gilmer (’13):  University of Iowa — PhD in Chemistry

Agre Challenge

agre-poster-2012The annual Agre Challenge, co-sponsored by the Augsburg Chemistry Society and the Augsburg Physics Society, will be held on 11/09/2012.

Walker Glassoe (class of 2013), research students of Dr. Dave Hanson, gave an oral presentation on “Sulfuric Acid Nucleation: A Systematic Study of the Effect of Bases” at the 31st annual American Association for Aerosol Research in Minneapolis, MN.

Nate Freshour (class of 2013), research students of Dr. Dave Hanson, also at the 31st annual American Association for Aerosol Research in Minneapolis, MN.

Passion for research yields amazing find

chemistry_main1Brian Krohn originally came to Augsburg to study film, but after only one semester without any science classes, this lifelong scientist felt “so deprived” that he officially changed his major to chemistry.

Growing up in Cloquet, Minnesota, Brian was always working on random projects — an electromagnet, a go-cart, various potato cannons, numerous attempts at tree forts, a lamp made from a car headlight, and a 15′ tall trebuchet. He even built a banjo from a mail-order kit. “I didn’t want to waste the money on buying a banjo, because I am musically inept, but I wanted to learn how to play one,” he said. He learned a couple of songs, but ultimately his interest in the banjo waned.

Though chemistry was his area of study, he was unsure where the degree would lead him. “I thought with a degree in chemistry, I could only be a teacher or a pharmacist,” he said. Then in the summer of 2006, Brian received a grant to do research, one of his passions, from Augsburg’s Undergraduate Research and Graduate Opportunity (URGO) program. He and his adviser, chemistry professor Arlin Gyberg, were both interested in biodiesel, so Brian set out to find a more efficient way to produce the fuel. Continue reading