Nobel Peace Prize Forum – Thank You Sponsors

 

The 29th Annual Nobel Peace Prize Forum — Minneapolis took place on September 15 and 16, 2017 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on Augsburg University’s campus, and honored and advanced the important accomplishments of the 2015 laureate, the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, recognized  “for its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in Tunisia in the wake of the Jasmine Revolution of 2011.”  The 2017 Forum focused on dialogue and strengthening democracy in divided societies.

 

Each year the Nobel Peace Prize Forum — Minneapolis brings together Nobel laureates, world leaders, and accomplished peacemakers with students and community members to work on building a world in which people can live full, rich, meaningful lives.  Originally formed as a consortium of the five Norwegian Lutheran colleges in the upper midwest (Augsburg University, Augustana University, Concordia College, Luther College, and St. Olaf College), the Forum operates under the auspices of the Norwegian Nobel Institute, and is the only such program or academic affiliation outside of Norway. Today the Forum is permanently hosted and presented by Augsburg University  in Minneapolis, Minnesota. For more information on the history of the Forum, please go to our history overview.

 

In additional to the founding schools, academic partners now include the University of Minnesota, University of Denver, California State University-Sacramento, Pacific Lutheran University, Juniata College, University of St. Thomas, and the University of Hawaii, Manoa, among others.  Community partners include Global Minnesota, youthrive, the Norway House, and the American Swedish Institute. Thank you to these academic partners and all the sponsors of the Nobel Peace Prize Forum, you support helps to advance peace around the world.

University of Minnesota, Greater MSP, Pacific Lutheran University, Sanford Health, 3M, American Institute of Architects, Augustana University, Concordia College, EGG Music, El Hibri Foundation Sacramento State, Juanita College, Luther College, McGough, Minnesota Peace Institute, More Believe, Norway House, Norwegian Embassy, Seward Co Op, The Thor Hyerdal Institute, Minnesota Transportation Museum, United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities, University of Denver, Winds of Peace Foundation, YouThrive, Changemaker, MPR News, University of St. Thomas
Thanks to all of our sponsors: University of Minnesota, Greater MSP, Pacific Lutheran University, Sanford Health, 3M, American Institute of Architects, Augustana University, Concordia College, EGG Music, El Hibri Foundation Sacramento State, Juanita College, Luther College, McGough, Minnesota Peace Institute, More Believe, Norway House, Norwegian Embassy, Seward Co Op, The Thor Hyerdal Institute, Minnesota Transportation Museum, United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities, University of Denver, Winds of Peace Foundation, YouThrive, Changemaker, MPR News, University of St. Thomas

 

 

Augsburg Awarded $475,000 to Help Infuse Sustainability Into All Facets of College Life

Augsburg University College and Career Partnership Programs Director Janet Morales in Community Garden

This fall, Augsburg University will launch initiatives to build capacity for integrating environmental sustainability across all curricular, co-curricular, and operational aspects of campus life.  

The initiatives are made possible by a grant from Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies. The Minnesota-based foundation believes that college and university campuses can serve as models of operational sustainability to the society at large, testing practical solutions that others can adopt.

Augsburg will provide students with additional opportunities to pursue internships and other experiences at sustainability-focused organizations, help strengthen and expand course offerings in Environmental Studies, and work to integrate sustainability and wellness across the academic curriculum. Funds will be made available for student and faculty research, curriculum innovation, and more.

Projects will be supervised by Allyson Green, Augsburg University chief sustainability officer, Associate Professor Joe Underhill, Program Director of Environmental Studies, Emily Schilling, assistant professor of Biology and Environmental Studies, and Christina Erickson, associate professor of Social Work and Environmental Studies and Batalden Faculty Scholar in Applied Ethics.

“The next breakthrough in sustainability could come from a student majoring in communications, philosophy, or education,” said Green, who also serves as director of the Campus Kitchen program. “For all of us to live on this planet sustainably and equitably, we need all perspectives, experiences, types of knowledge, and skill-sets to be part of the work. The breadth of this challenge is daunting, and an interdisciplinary approach opens immense opportunities.”

Augsburg University President Paul C. Pribbenow believes that efforts to achieve sustainability must give consideration to the environment, the economy, and issues of equity.

“As a college of the Lutheran Church, we’re called to prepare our students to address and overcome global challenges such as climate change, hunger and food insecurity, and limited access to clean water,” said Pribbenow. “As a liberal arts institution embedded in a diverse, urban environment, we’re accustomed to collaboration across disciplines and beyond the classroom. These important initiatives will better position us to meet these challenges head on.”

This is the second recent grant the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation has awarded Augsburg. In 2015, the foundation contributed $1 million to the campaign to build the Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion.

Photo: Janet Morales, director of College and Career Partnership Programs, plucks vegetables from her plot in the Augsburg University community garden. The garden, which has about 80 plots, is open to members of the Augsburg University community and the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood.

Join Augsburg in Welcoming Global Peacemakers to Minnesota

Augsburg College invites regional and national businesses and charitable foundations to consider sponsorship of the Nobel Peace Prize Forum.

Sponsors of this annual event will have a unique opportunity to send a delegation of leaders within their organization to engage in meaningful conversation with leaders and peacebuilders from across the globe.

The 2017 Forum will take place September 13th-16th on the campus of Augsburg College. This year, we welcome Tunisia’s National Dialogue Quartet, the group awarded the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize for efforts to establish a pluralistic democracy in Tunisia. Other featured guests include Norwegian Ambassador Kåre R. Aas, explorer Ann Bancroft, Arizona congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, Global Health Corps’ co-founder Barbara Bush, and Yale University professor Elijah Anderson.

Through plenary sessions, workshops, and other events, the Forum will engage in national and international dialogues around the most pressing issues of our time. Dynamic speakers from across the globe will be invited to address the Forum’s five pillars:

* Human Rights and Social Justice
* Environmental Sustainability
* Food Security and Economic Development
* Global Health Systems
* Disarmament and Conflict Resolution

More information can be found at nobelpeaceprizeforum.org.

Please contact Lee George at lgeorge@augsburg.edu or 612 330-1629 for more information on sponsor benefits, levels of participation, and more.

How We Can Solve the Addiction Crisis

Guest post by Kevin Kirby, CEO, Face It TOGETHER

Close to 70 percent of those suffering from drug and alcohol addiction go to work. Another three to four family members are affected at home. But only 10 percent of those who need help will get treatment in a given year. Most continue to hide their disease due to stigma, shame, and fear, driving tremendous costs in the workplace. Unfortunately, employers historically have been ignored or perceived as adversaries by many in the traditional addiction recovery movement. But because employers and the private sector bear some of the greatest costs when it comes to addiction, they’re also positioned to affect the greatest change.

  • In 2010, excessive drinking cost the U.S. $249 billion, mostly due to reduced productivity, crime, and the cost of treating related health problems.Living In Recovery - Working In A Culture of Alcohol
  • On average, untreated addiction in the workplace costs employers $1,700 per employee per year.
  • Addiction problems annually cost business 500 million workdays.
  • People with an alcohol problem use twice as much sick leave and are five times more likely to file workers’ compensation claims.
  • Health care costs for employees with addiction problems are twice those for other employees.
  • Individuals with addiction problems are far more likely to have worked for three or more employers in the previous year.

Since 2009, we’ve been working in partnership with employers to help their employees and family members get well from addiction. Our innovative program brings culture change and peer support to the workplace to improve the bottom line.
We offer employers a powerful value proposition: we help them address one of their most pressing and costly workforce issues. Our work leads to stronger employee engagement and productivity, as well as reduced attrition and operational costs.

 

Our focus is culture change. We help employers integrate addiction into their chronic disease management or wellness programs. The goal is to remove stigma, fear, and other barriers to seeking help.

 

The program is customized and easy to implement. Key elements include:

 

  • Workplace education and outreach
  • Coordination with Employee Assistance Programs and wellness and benefits programs
  • Supervisor training and human resources support
  • Peer recovery coaching and navigation to services (virtual or in person)
  • Coworkers in recovery peer support programs
  • Outcomes measurement

An example of the initiative in action is with Raven Industries, a publicly held technology company in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. During the past 4 years, our work with Raven has led to more than a dozen employees coming forward for help. Raven invested $44,000 in the program and estimates a return on investment multiple times that sum due to employee retention and other costs savings. Learn more from our case study on the partnership.

 

People suffering from addiction spend about one third of their lives at work. As we tell the employers we work with, solving addiction will not only get people well, it is good for business. And it’s also good for our communities. Real and meaningful solutions to addiction will only come when we face these challenges together.

 

Hear from people we’ve helped. Watch a video on our workplace partnerships.

 

———-
Kevin Kirby is a long-term addiction survivor and successful business executive, using his skills and experience to help transform what communities think and do about the disease of drug and alcohol addiction. 

 

Face It TOGETHER is a nationally focused nonprofit that began in 2009 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; this year they will expand their network to six states. Their mission is to get drug and alcohol addiction sufferers well. Face It TOGETHER is dedicated to fostering system change around the disease of addiction. A key focus of their work is peer recovery coaching, with a major emphasis on data, technology and outcomes measurement.

 

wefaceittogether.org

Foundation Gift Helps Auggie Veterans Develop Leadership Skills

dav-mn-check-presentation

Thanks to a grant from the Disabled American Veterans of Minnesota (Chapter 1, Minneapolis), Augsburg College will offer two $5,000 fellowships to benefits-eligible veterans who enroll in the Master of Arts in Leadership (MAL) program or the Master of Arts in Leadership/Master of Business Administration (MAL/MBA) dual degree program.

Veterans will enhance their leadership skills and résumés through the new DAV Fellow in Public Scholarship program, which focuses on translating military skills into civilian leadership experience.

“We recognize the unique leadership skills that student veterans bring to their academic studies,” said Augsburg College President Paul Pribbenow. “We also recognize that even though VA benefits offset most or all of tuition costs, there are still financial barriers to pursuing a graduate-level degree and securing a high-impact internship or job.”

One of the key elements of the program is its focus on experiential learning.

“By carrying out a mentor-supported action project, fellows will hone both their leadership strengths and their ability to affect change in their communities,” said Alan Tuchtenhagen, director of the MAL program. “From public speaking and research to coaching and mentoring, fellows will have opportunities to apply their knowledge through real work and experience.”

U.S. News & World Report recently ranked Augsburg one of the Best Colleges for Veterans, acknowledging the College’s participation in federal initiatives that assist  veterans and active service members as they apply, pay for, and complete their degrees. Augsburg also has been named a Military Friendly® School for each of the past two years. Military Friendly Schools are recognized for going above and beyond to provide transitioning veterans the best possible experience in higher education.

“One of the DAV’s primary goals is to support the reintegration of veterans into society,” said Jim Kline ’01 MAL, Senior Vice Commander of DAV of Minnesota (Chapter 1, Minneapolis) and an Augsburg alumnus. “This fellowship will help veterans recognize how the skills they earned in service can be put to use in a business setting.”

More than 120 Augsburg students identify as military members or veterans, and more than half of these individuals are eligible for full VA education benefits. These students are enrolled in Augsburg’s traditional undergraduate, adult undergraduate, and graduate programs at its locations in Minneapolis and Rochester.

Happy Veterans Day to students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends who have served.

Pictured Above (L to R): Mark Jaruszewski (Adjutant, DAV of MN, Chapter 1, Minneapolis); Ray Gabrau ’18, Augsburg Student Veteran Representative; Ann Garvey, Vice President of Student Affairs; Jim Kline, ’01 MAL, DAV of MN, Chapter 1, Minneapolis; Jenna McMorrow, ’18 MSW, Veterans Integration to Academic Leadership (VITAL) intern; Alan Tuchtenhagen, Director, Master of Arts in Leadership Program.

Photo taken in the U.S. Bank Veterans’ Lounge, Oren Gateway Center 110.

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Celebrates the Success of Midnimo Partnership

Earlier this month, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation published a spotlight on the Cedar Cultural Center’s Midnimo project.

Midnimo, the Somali word for “unity,” showcased Somali artists from Minnesota and around the world in residencies and events that were designed to increase the public’s understanding of Somali culture through music. The project was launched by the Cedar in 2014 in partnership with Augsburg College by way of the foundation’s Building Bridges: Campus Community Engagement fund.

Below is an excerpt of the profile. Click here to read the full article.

“Over time, the relationships between the Augsburg College students, Somali community members, and visiting artists and audiences have moved forward through the arts, which Dorn calls “a stepping stone” into conversations with new and maybe still unfamiliar neighbors. In the midst of myriad misconceptions and stereotypes about Somalis, Midnimo has provided the platform for often disparate groups to connect and get to know each other in authentic ways. One student trumpeter at Augsburg was moved when a Somali musician told him that “you’re one of us now.” His experience in Midnimo, said the student, had been “the best five months of my life, being able to do this work with the Somali musicians.

The lasting effects of this program extend beyond the students and Somali musicians and into Somali cultural heritage, as well. Early on, the Augsburg Music Department had realized that to best accompany the Somali musicians, they needed to create written sheet music not present in Somali culture. This compelled the Augsburg Music Department to embark on transcribing as much of it as they could, inadvertently beginning a process of documenting and preserving Somalia’s musical tradition for generations to come.”

Photo courtesy of The Cedar Cultural Center. 

Augsburg Awarded $50,000 to Expand Recycling and Composting Program

Augsburg College Green Campus

Earlier this month, Augsburg College was awarded a $50,000 recycling grant through the Hennepin County Environment and Energy Department. The grant will help the College complete an effort, begun in early 2015, to increase the amount of organic and compostable items diverted from trash and other recycling. Funds provided by the county will be used to purchase indoor and outdoor bins, rolling carts, and signage to encourage increased recycling of organic materials as well as other mixed recyclables.

Submission of the proposal was a collaborative effort between Augsburg’s Environmental Stewardship Committee (ESC), facilities and custodial staff, and the Augsburg Day Student Government’s Environmental Action Committee. This marked the first time that these three groups have worked together on a campus issue.

“Recycling is near and dear to the entire community,” said Christina Erickson, associate professor in the Department of Social Work and program director in Environmental Studies. “And, yet, it’s surprisingly hard to do well. Bins and signage are an important component of helping this process along, but they are also extremely expensive. This grant allows us to think through this process and make purchases that will work for the entire campus community.”

In 2015, Augsburg’s Custodial Services department converted all paper towels to a compostable and more sustainably manufactured option. It also began using bath tissues made from non-tree fibers containing 65% recycled fiber content. The coreless 100% solid tissue rolls create less waste and reduce transportation costs.

With this grant, custodial staff will install new interior and exterior bins across campus, post new signage, and place specialty containers across campus to collect used batteries, plastic bags, and small electronics.

Michelle Nies, custodial services manager, noted that her team will share information on the expanded program with all current and incoming students, as well as their parents, so they can incorporate recycling and composting into their campus homes.

The ESC since 1999 has guided Augsburg’s efforts to integrate environmental stewardship into all aspects of campus life. Comprised of students, faculty, and staff, the ESC engages in various projects and outreach initiatives including curriculum review, workshops, transit fairs, energy and waste audits, lectures, green purchasing audits, and more.

The grant furthers the Augsburg 2019 strategic plan which outlines a commitment to be “Green by 2019”. In September of 2010, a task force submitted a climate action plan for Augsburg’s Minneapolis campus to reduce carbon output by 2019, the year of its sesquicentennial.

The Student Government’s Environmental Action Committee voted in March to provide the necessary contribution of matching funds required to secure the county grant. Erickson was grateful that students embraced the idea and took an active interest in the proposal. Committee members also will carry out volunteer-led projects and campaigns to educate Augsburg’s undergraduate and residential population about the expanded organics program.

Amber Lewis, a graduate student in the Education department and an Environmental Stewardship Fellow, is hopeful that the grant will increase recycling in three high-traffic areas of campus: Si Melby Hall and Kennedy Center; Event and Conference Planning; and the various residence halls.

“From commencement ceremonies and sporting events to convocations and conferences, thousands of people touch the campus in some way during the course of one year,” Lewis said. “Sustainability is something that Augsburg wants to present as a central characteristic of our diverse body of students, faculty, and staff. It’s important to all of us that anyone who visits our campus has access to recycling and composting. This grant has provided us with the funding necessary to see that vision move forward.”

“There is a growing awareness of the need for sustainable living among those who spend their days and nights on this campus,” said Nicholas Stewart-Bloch ’17, who leads the student Environmental Action Committee. “Much of this is manifested in small decisions such as recycling or using public transportation. There is still much work to be done to fully consider all the various ways in which we affect our environment, but there is a growing interest among students in helping reduce our carbon footprint.”

To learn more, please visit the Environmental Stewardship Committee website.

AUGSBURG HOSTS THE 2016 LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

 

Wednesday, May 18 at Augsburg College

Join fellow professionals and business leaders in a day of leadership and intercultural competency development. The 2016 Leadership Summit offers two morning sessions to develop you as a leader and understand how you handle conflict and manage a team. These sessions are followed by a networking and a presentation by Jodi Harpstead, CEO of Lutheran Social Services.

Morning Sessions

Professor of Leadership Studies, Tom Morgan, will lead you through the Input Output Processing template and facilitate a discussion on strategy development and decision-making. In this session you will learn about how individual team members take in information and how they act on it.

Chief Diversity Officer at Augsburg College, Joanne Reeck, will walk you through the Intercultural Conflict Styles Inventory Workshop. This workshop is designed to help individuals continue to grow in the intercultural competence and to build the awareness, knowledge, and skills necessary to create more inclusive spaces in the workplace and beyond.

Keynote

Jodi Harpstead, CEO of Lutheran Social Services presents 150 years of Learning to Live Together – Midway in our Journey?

Prior to serving as Lutheran Social Services CEO, Jodi spent 23 years with Medtronic, Inc where she held significant positions including President of Global Marketing and U.S. Sales in the Cardiac Rhythm Management Division. An exceptional leader, she has volunteered in leadership capacities for a variety of other organizations. Her perspective and insights on compassion and competence to make a difference help serve the connection between the business and nonprofit sectors of Minnesota’s economy.

Register Here

This event is part of the Midway Chamber of Commerce events and programs.

Fees/Admission:

Member Pricing
$35 for session or luncheon ONLY
$50 for summit and luncheonNon Member Pricing
$50 for session or luncheon ONLY
$75 for summit and luncheon

 

Date/Time Information:
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Leadership Workshop Location: Oren Gateway Center
8:30 AM – 9 AM- Registration for Leadership Workshop
9 AM – 11 AM- Leadership Workshop
Luncheon Location: Foss Center
11:30 AM – Noon- Registration & Networking for Luncheon
Noon- 1 PM – Luncheon featuring Jodi Harpstead, CEO of Lutheran Social Services

Youth Theology Institute Receives Nearly $500,000 from Lilly Endowment

The Augsburg College Youth Theology Institute (ACYTI) will enter its 13th year with a huge boost from the Lilly Endowment.

This month, Augsburg received a grant of $476,188 to bolster its summer Youth Theology Institute. The award is part of Lilly Endowment Inc.’s High School Youth Theology Institutelily-logos initiative, which seeks to encourage young people to explore theological traditions, ask questions about the moral dimensions of contemporary issues, and examine how their faith calls them to lives of service.

“This grant supports Augsburg’s continued commitment to intentional diversity and to modeling what it means to be a Lutheran college of the 21st century, located in the heart of one of the nation’s most diverse zip codes,” said Augsburg College President Paul Pribbenow.

“It equips young people with theological and vocational skills and helps them learn what it means to practice their faith, with its commitments to education, radical hospitality and serving your neighbor.”

Each summer, ACYTI gathers rising 10th, 11th and 12th graders and recent graduates for an intense week of friendship, classroom learning, worship, solitude, contemplation, discernment, and action on Augsburg’s urban campus. Participants, mentors, instructors, and program staff learn together, pray together, play together, explore the city together, and discern God’s work in the world together.

Since its inception in 2004, the program has been designed to carry out a theme that’s germane not only to the Augsburg’s mission, but also to key topics in current events. Augsburg’s emphasis on interdisciplinary learning shaped the 2013 Institute, titled “Navigating the Intersection of Science and Theology,” and the 2014 Institute, titled “Christian Community in the Internet Age.” Likewise, the 2012 Institute, “Stories Worth Living: Exploring Lives of Interfaith Action,” was very much reflective of the college’s setting in a largely Muslim neighborhood, as well as its growing diversity.

Over the course of the year following the Institute, Augsburg faculty and staff will provide ongoing guidance and support so that students can better engage with the themes of the Institute at home, in school, in church, and in their community. In doing so, the Institute hopes to provide students with a more thorough and more thoughtful exploration of opportunities for leadership in those settings.

“We pack a lot into one week,” said Jeremy Myers, ACYTI’s Program Director, “but we have found there to be a significant need for more frequent communication with participants and families as well as with their pastors and/or youth ministers.”

In its expansion, the ACYTI will be carrying out part of an institutional strategy to enhance Augsburg’s connections to congregations. The ACYTI will first focus on outreach to the four designated ELCA synods that form Augsburg’s governing structure—Minneapolis, Saint Paul, Southeastern Minnesota, and Northwest Wisconsin, but also plans to build stronger ties to specific congregations in the Twin Cities metro area and beyond.

The program hopes to increase attendance to 20 students in 2016, 30 in 2017, 35 in 2018, and 40 by 2019. The college will continue to provide a scholarship of $1,000 per year, per student, for up to four years, for those who wish to enroll at Augsburg.

The 2016 ACYTI will take place June 19-24, 2016 on the campus of Augsburg College. The Institute will be directed by Dr. Jeremy Myers. Dr. Myers is associate professor of religion in the Youth and Family Ministry department. Justin Lind-Ayres, Augsburg’s Associate College Pastor, will lead worships and other leadership exercises. Lonna Field, Program Coordinator for the Christensen Center for Vocation, will continue serving as the Institute’s primary coordinator.

Lilly Endowment Inc. is an Indianapolis-based private philanthropic foundation created in 1937 by three members of the Lilly family – J.K. Lilly Sr. and sons J.K. Jr. and Eli – through gifts of stock in their pharmaceutical business, Eli Lilly & Company.

To learn more, please visit the ACYTI website.