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Degree Requirements 2018-2019

The Computer Science program gives students a sound conceptual understanding of computer science and practical skills applying computer science to solve problems. We offer both a BA and a BS degree. Our location in the Twin Cities provides students many opportunities to strengthen their practical skills through internships with local businesses.

Computer Science Major, Bachelor of Arts

  • CSC 160 – Introduction to Computer Science and Communication
  • CSC 170 – Introduction to Programming
  • CSC 210 – Data Structures
  • CSC 240 – Introduction to Networking and Communications
  • CSC 320 – Algorithms
  • CSC 345 – Principles of Computer Organization
  • CSC 385 – Formal Logic and Computation Theory
  • CSC 450 – Programming Languages and Compilers I
  • CSC 451 – Programming Languages and Compilers II
  • MAT 114 – Precalculus (or MPG 4)
  • One of MAT 171 or MAT 271
    • MAT 171 – Discrete Mathematics for Computing (recommended)
    • MAT 271 – Discrete Mathematical Structures
  • Two electives (8 credits) from:
    • CSC courses above 200
    • PHY 261 – Electronics
    • MIS 475 – Systems Analysis and Design
    • MAT 355 – Numerical Mathematics and Computation

At least one elective must be an upper division course. Students may apply up to 4 credit hours of internship towards the major.

Graduation Skills

The Critical Thinking (CT), Quantitative Reasoning (QR,) and Writing (W) graduation skills are embedded throughout the offered courses and are met by completing the major. The Speaking (S) graduation skill is met by MAT 201, COM 111 or 115. Consult your faculty advisor for details.

Transfer students must consult an advisor about potential adjustments to their course requirements to fulfill each of these skills.

Computer Science Major, Bachelor of Science

  • CSC 160 – Introduction to Computer Science and Communication
  • CSC 170 – Introduction to Programming
  • CSC 210 – Data Structures
  • CSC 240 – Introduction to Networking and Communications
  • CSC 320 – Algorithms
  • CSC 345 – Principles of Computer Organization
  • CSC 385 – Formal Logic and Computation Theory
  • CSC 450 – Programming Languages and Compilers I
  • CSC 451 – Programming Languages and Compilers II
  • MAT 145 – Calculus I
  • MAT 271 – Discrete Mathematical Structures (students who have already completed MAT 171 may choose to substitute a third MAT elective from the list below)
  • Two courses from:
    • MAT 146 – Calculus II
    • MAT 245 – Calculus III
    • MAT 246 – Linear Algebra
    • MAT 304 – Graph Theory
    • MAT 355 – Numerical Mathematics and Computation
    • MAT 363 – Dynamical Systems
    • MAT 369 – Modeling and Differential Equations in Biological and Natural Sciences
  • Three electives (12 credits), including at least two electives numbered 300 or above, chosen from:
    • CSC courses above 200
    • PHY 261 – Electronics
    • MIS 475 – Systems Analysis and Design
    • MAT 355 – Numerical Mathematics and Computation (if not selected above)

Students may apply up to 4 credit hours of internship towards the major. MAT 355 may only count once toward the major.

Graduation Skills

The Critical Thinking (CT), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), and Writing (W) graduation skills are embedded throughout the offered courses and are met by completing the major. The Speaking (S) graduation skill is met by: MAT 201, COM 111 or 115. Consult your faculty advisor for details.

Transfer students must consult an advisor about potential adjustments to their course requirements to fulfill each of these skills.

Computational Economics

The Computational Economics major has been designed to serve students with need for some basic understanding of computer science and economics. The major requires six courses from Computer Science, six from Economics, and a required capstone independent study. Students interested in this major should consult with the faculty in Computer Science, in Economics, or one of the coordinators.

Coordinator

Jeanne Boeh, Department of Economics

Major in Computational Economics

  • MAT 145 – Calculus I
  • CSC 160 – Introduction to Computer Science and Communication
  • CSC 170 – Introduction to Programming
  • CSC 210 – Data Structures
  • One of CSC 240, CSC 320, or CSC 352
    • CSC 240 – Introduction to Networking and Communications
    • CSC 320 – Algorithms
    • CSC 352 – Database Management and Design
  • CSC 345 – Principles of Computer Organization
  • ECO 112 – Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECO 113 – Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECO 312 – Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • ECO 313 – Intermediate Microeconomics
  • ECO 315 – Money and Banking
  • ECO 318 – Management Science
  • CSC/ECO 499 – Independent Study

Graduation Skills

The Speaking (S), Critical Thinking (CT), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), and Writing (W) graduation skills are embedded throughout the offered courses and are met by completing the major. Transfer students must consult an advisor about potential adjustments to their course requirements to fulfill each of these skills.

Computational Philosophy

Computational Philosophy emphasizes areas of interest in which philosophy and computer science overlap: logic, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of language. The major requires seven courses from computer science, six from philosophy, and a required capstone topics course. Students interested in this major should consult with the faculty in computer science, in philosophy, or one of the coordinators.

Coordinator

David Apolloni, Department of Philosophy

Major in Computational Philosophy

  • MAT 114 – Precalculus (or MPG 4)
  • One of MAT 171 or MAT 271
    • MAT 171 – Discrete Mathematics for Computing
    • MAT 271 – Discrete Mathematical Structures
  • CSC 160 – Introduction to Computer Science and Communication
  • CSC 170 – Introduction to Programming
  • CSC 210 – Data Structures
  • CSC 320 – Algorithms
  • CSC 373 – Symbolic Programming and Artificial Intelligence
  • CSC 385 – Formal Logic and Computation Theory
  • PHI 241 – History of Philosophy I: Ancient Greek Philosophy
  • PHI 242 – History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy
  • PHI 343 – History of Philosophy III: Early Modern and 19th-Century Philosophy
  • PHI 344 – History of Philosophy IV: 20th-Century Philosophy
  • PHI 365 – Philosophy of Science
  • One of PHI 410 or CSC 495
    • PHI 410 – Topics in Philosophy
    • CSC 495 – Advanced Topics in Computer Science
  • One upper division elective in philosophy

Graduation Skills

The Speaking (S), Critical Thinking (CT), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), and Writing (W) graduation skills are embedded throughout the offered courses and are met by completing the major.

Transfer students must consult an advisor about potential adjustments to their course requirements to fulfill each of these skills.

Departmental Honors

Students completing the B.S. in Computer Science who have excellent performance in courses (GPA 3.00 overall, GPA 3.50 in CSC courses numbered 210 and above), complete an independent investigation or application of the discipline (including a public presentation), and are involved in the life of the discipline should apply to the department for honors.

Computer Science Minor

  • CSC 160
  • CSC 170
  • CSC 210
  • One of CSC 320 or CSC 345
  • One additional upper division Computer Science course
  • One of MAT 171 or MAT 271

Internships may not be used as electives toward the minor.

Course Grading

A course must be completed with a grade of C- or higher to be counted as completing a major or minor requirement.


For a complete list of courses and descriptions, see the Course Description Search.