2013-2014

 

      Please scroll down to the appropriate film screening date: January 13, February 19, April 2, April 4.

 

January 31, 2014

 

Stardreamers

Stardreamers The Spirit Water People

Part I: “The Indian System”

 

Presented by

Sheldon Wolfchild, Director and Mark Diedrich, Historian

“The Indian System,” created by filmmaker Sheldon Wolfchild, is part one of a three-part documentary which traces back into the 1800s interaction of Dakota with the United States Government and the State of Minnesota. Minnesota historians have long-neglected an in-depth digging into the commonly used sources on the Dakota War of 1862. It has never been clearly pointed out that the war was prompted by corruption in the Indian Department. This corruption was exposed decades ago in a book, Lincoln and the Indians, by Dr. David Nichols. Recently Mark Diedrich, an independent historian, has written a study of Little Crow and the Dakota War. These two historians have found out that there was a period of great corruption which continually affected the Treaty relationship between the Dakota and the U.S. government. Furthermore, there was a concerted cover-up by people at the time and later historians ( either knowing or unknowingly ) to protect people that were involved in this corruption. Thus, the Dakota have always been blamed unfairly for the war of 1862. The way the government conducted their Indian affairs was referred to by Bishop Henry Whipple as ” The Indian System “

About the Director:

Sheldon P. Wolfchild is a member of the Lower Sioux Indian Community who has appeared in a number of feature Films and television shows. Wolfchild researched the history of Dakota people in Minnesota and interviewed elders for over 15 years for his documentary film “Star Dreamers – The Spirit Water People.” The film weaves oral and written history and traditional Dakota beliefs together to offer a telling of the Dakota story in a way that text books he grew up reading never did.

Place: Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Time: 6:30-9:30 pm

  • 6:30-7:00 Introductions
  • Screening begins at 7:00
  • Discussion follows

All events are free to the public.

Thank you to our sponsors: Facilitating Racial Equity Collaborative, the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, Facilitating Racial Equity Collaborative, Brotherhood Brew, SPIN: Saint Paul Interfaith Network, and Discussions That Encounter.

SPIN

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For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series

Augsburg College

CB 115

2011 Riverside Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55454

 

February 19, 2014

Suddenly Samí (Min Mors Hemmelighet)

SuddenlySami

A film by Ellen-Astri Lundby (2009)

Presented by Dr. Angelica Lawson

 

Suddenly Sami is a personal film about identity.  When the director discovers that her mother has been hiding her Indigenous Sami background from her, Ellen sets out to Northern Norway to discover why.  Ellen’s story explores the impact of relocation and diaspora on the Indigenous peoples of Norway and how this history has impacted Sami identity.

 

About Dr. Angelica Lawson

 

Dr. Lawson is an assistant professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities where she teaches American Indian and Indigenous film.

About the Director:

Ellen-Astri Lundby (b. 1959), a freelance reporter and filmmaker, has worked in film and television since 1989 creating humorous short fiction and documentary films.

 

Place: Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Time: 6:30 to 9:30 pm.

  • 6:30-7:00 Introductions
  • Screening begins at 7:00
  • Discussion follows

All events are free to the public.

For More Sami Film Events visit: http://www.nordiclightsfilmfestival.org/

Thank you to our sponsors: the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, and the University of Minnesota’s American Indian Studies Department.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series

Augsburg College

CB 115

2011 Riverside Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55454

 

April 2, 2014

Matriarchal Voices–Stories of Indigenous Women Filmmakers

Spider Woman’s Call

 

4

Hosted by Director Jennifer Machiorlatti

Matriarchal Voices – Stories of Indigenous Women Filmmakers is a lyrical documentary series presenting stories about the storytellers – Indigenous women who use film, video, and multimedia to carry on storytelling traditions through contemporary media.  “Spider Woman’s Call” – episode one of the series focuses on five filmmakers from the U.S. and Canada who share their motivations for working in cinematic storytelling—from cultural recovery and celebration to the importance of historical accuracy.

About the Director:

Jennifer Machiorlatti is a media artist and educator who has exhibited work at national and international film festivals, galleries and on the web. Her essays on Indigenous and women’s media appear in the South Atlantic Review, PostScript – Essays in Film and the Humanities, Ethnic Media in America, Framing the World: Ecocriticism and Film and Native American Voices: Conversations, Teaching, and Theory.  Jennifer teaches media and cultural studies, media production and intercultural communication at Western Michigan University.  She is an organic gardener and works with the Detroit, Michigan based EarthWalk organization initiating and mentoring young women.

April 2, 2014

Time: 6:15-9:00

  • Reception 6:15-6:45
  • Introductions, Screening & Discussion 6:45 pm-9:00pm

Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Thank you to our sponsors: the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, Women’s Studies and the Anne Pederson Women’s Resource Center.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series

Augsburg College

CB 115

2011 Riverside Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55454

April 4, 2014

The Cherokee Word for Water

CherokeeWordWater2

 

The Cherokee Word for Water  is a feature-length motion picture that tells the story of the work that led Wilma Mankiller to become the first modern female Chief of the Cherokee Nation. It is a feature-length motion picture inspired by the true story of the struggle for, opposition to, and ultimate success of a rural Cherokee community to bring running water to their families by using the traditional concept of “gadugi “– working together to solve a problem.

Set in the early 1980s, The Cherokee Word For Water begins in the homes of a rural Oklahoma community where many houses lack running water and others are little more than shacks. After centuries of being dehumanized and dispossessed of their land and identity, the people no longer feel they have power or control over their lives or future.

Based on the true story of the Bell Waterline Project, the movie is about a community coming together to improve its life condition. Led by Wilma Mankiller, who went on to become the first woman chief of the Cherokee Nation, and fullblood Cherokee organizer Charlie Soap, they join forces and build nearly twenty miles of waterline using a community of volunteers. In the process, they inspire the community to trust each other, and reawaken universal indigenous values of reciprocity and interconnectedness. The successful completion of the waterline sparked a movement of similar self-help projects across the Cherokee nation and in Indian country that continues to this day.

Directed by: Tim Kelly and Charlie Soap, 2013

Place: Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Time: 6:15 to 9:30 pm.

  • Reception 6:15-6:45
  • Screening begins at 6:45
  • Discussion follows

All events are free to the public.

Thank you to our sponsors: the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, Native Americans in Philanthropy and the American Indian Cancer Foundation.

 

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For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series

Augsburg College

CB 115

2011 Riverside Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55454