October 29, 2014: Listening for the Rain

Listening for the Rain: Indigenous Perspectives on Climate Change

Created by media artists Jeffrey Palmer (Kiowa) and Filoteo Gómez Martínez (Ayuuk), and emerging out of an interdisciplinary research project, this thought-provoking film documents stories and observations about climate change from different Indigenous communities in the central United States. Through the stories they tell, we learn how diverse tribal landscapes have been effected by environmental change and how Indian Country is working on this important issue.

Our screening will also include a discussion with the two filmmakers, Jeff and Filoteo, and Sonia Davila Poblete (Bolivian) whose work with Indigenous communities there around water and environmental issues will add a North-South connection to our pluricultural conversations.

https://vimeo.com/92113095

About the Presenters

Filo's PictureFiloteo Gómez Martínez is an Ayuuk (Mixe) filmmaker from the Sierra Mixe of Oaxaca, Mexico who now resides in Norman, Oklahoma and studies geography at the University of Oklahoma. Filo learned to make videos through workshops organized by state and international agencies, academic entities, and activist organizations. His first video Dulce Convivencia/Sweet Gathering was well received, won several international awards, and can be viewed online via IsumaTV. More recently, Filo has been working on videos about Indigenous and other migrant communities in Milwaukee and in Oklahoma City. He has also been collaborating with Jeffrey Palmer a Kiowa filmmaker and researchers at the University of Oklahoma to document the impacts of climate change in Indian Country.
 Davila2-155x155Sonia Davila-Poblete Ph.D., is a sociologist specializing in integrated water management, river basin and environmental policies. As Emeritus Member of the Technical Advisor Committee of the Global Water Partnership (GWP), independent consultant and advisor, she works with grassroots groups, governments, and international organizations on social issues that have to deal with environmental problems, mainly in Mexico and Bolivia. Her primary interests include: foregrounding the Andean culture’s “Living Well” paradigm into the search of solutions for environmental and climate change issues, advocating for nature in development projects, and mainstreaming a gender perspective in all public policies.

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:00-6:30
Screening begins at 6:45
Discussion with filmmakers follows

 

Thank you to our sponsors:
Augsburg College
American Indian Studies Department
Environmental Studies Program
Department of Social Work
Center for Earth, Energy, and Democracy
Future First

 


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The Cherokee Word for Water

CherokeeWordWater2April 4, 2014

The Cherokee Word for Water  is a feature-length motion picture that tells the story of the work that led Wilma Mankiller to become the first modern female Chief of the Cherokee Nation. It is a feature-length motion picture inspired by the true story of the struggle for, opposition to, and ultimate success of a rural Cherokee community to bring running water to their families by using the traditional concept of “gadugi “– working together to solve a problem.

Set in the early 1980s, The Cherokee Word For Water begins in the homes of a rural Oklahoma community where many houses lack running water and others are little more than shacks. After centuries of being dehumanized and dispossessed of their land and identity, the people no longer feel they have power or control over their lives or future.

Based on the true story of the Bell Waterline Project, the movie is about a community coming together to improve its life condition. Led by Wilma Mankiller, who went on to become the first woman chief of the Cherokee Nation, and fullblood Cherokee organizer Charlie Soap, they join forces and build nearly twenty miles of waterline using a community of volunteers. In the process, they inspire the community to trust each other, and reawaken universal indigenous values of reciprocity and interconnectedness. The successful completion of the waterline sparked a movement of similar self-help projects across the Cherokee nation and in Indian country that continues to this day.

Directed by: Tim Kelly and Charlie Soap, 2013

Place: Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Time: 6:15 to 9:30 pm.

  • Reception 6:15-6:45
  • Screening begins at 6:45
  • Discussion follows

All events are free to the public.

Thank you to our sponsors: the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, Native Americans in Philanthropy and the American Indian Cancer Foundation.

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Matriarchal Voices–Stories of Indigenous Women Filmmakers

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April 2, 2014

Matriarchal Voices–Stories of Indigenous Women Filmmakers – “Spider Woman’s Call”

Hosted by Director Jennifer Machiorlatti

Matriarchal Voices – Stories of Indigenous Women Filmmakers is a lyrical documentary series presenting stories about the storytellers – Indigenous women who use film, video, and multimedia to carry on storytelling traditions through contemporary media.  “Spider Woman’s Call” – episode one of the series focuses on five filmmakers from the U.S. and Canada who share their motivations for working in cinematic storytelling—from cultural recovery and celebration to the importance of historical accuracy.

About the Director:

Jennifer Machiorlatti is a media artist and educator who has exhibited work at national and international film festivals, galleries and on the web. Her essays on Indigenous and women’s media appear in the South Atlantic Review, PostScript – Essays in Film and the Humanities, Ethnic Media in America, Framing the World: Ecocriticism and Film and Native American Voices: Conversations, Teaching, and Theory.  Jennifer teaches media and cultural studies, media production and intercultural communication at Western Michigan University.  She is an organic gardener and works with the Detroit, Michigan based EarthWalk organization initiating and mentoring young women.

April 2, 2014

Time: 6:15-9:00

  • Reception 6:15-6:45
  • Introductions, Screening & Discussion 6:45 pm-9:00pm

Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Thank you to our sponsors: the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, Women’s Studies and the Anne Pederson Women’s Resource Center.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series

Augsburg College

CB 115

2011 Riverside Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55454

Suddenly Samí (Min Mors Hemmelighet)

SuddenlySami

February 19, 2014

 

Suddenly Samí (Min Mors Hemmelighet)

A film by Ellen-Astri Lundby (2009)

Presented by Dr. Angelica Lawson

Suddenly Sami is a personal film about identity.  When the director discovers that her mother has been hiding her Indigenous Sami background from her, Ellen sets out to Northern Norway to discover why.  Ellen’s story explores the impact of relocation and diaspora on the Indigenous peoples of Norway and how this history has impacted Sami identity.

About Dr. Angelica Lawson

Dr. Lawson is an assistant professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities where she teaches American Indian and Indigenous film.

About the Director:

Ellen-Astri Lundby (b. 1959), a freelance reporter and filmmaker, has worked in film and television since 1989 creating humorous short fiction and documentary films.

Place: Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Time: 6:30 to 9:30 pm.

  • 6:30-7:00 Introductions
  • Screening begins at 7:00
  • Discussion follows

All events are free to the public.

For More Sami Film Events visit: http://www.nordiclightsfilmfestival.org/

Thank you to our sponsors: the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, and the University of Minnesota’s American Indian Studies Department.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series

Augsburg College

CB 115

2011 Riverside Avenue

Minneapolis, MN 55454

 

Star Dreamers — the Spirit Water People, Part I: “The Indian System”

January 31, 2014

Stardreamers

Stardreamers – The Spirit Water People, Part I: “The Indian System” 

Presented by Sheldon Wolfchild, Director and Mark Diedrich, Historian

“The Indian System,” created by filmmaker Sheldon Wolfchild, is part one of a three-part documentary which traces back into the 1800s interaction of Dakota with the United States Government and the State of Minnesota. Minnesota historians have long-neglected an in-depth digging into the commonly used sources on the Dakota War of 1862. It has never been clearly pointed out that the war was prompted by corruption in the Indian Department. This corruption was exposed decades ago in a book, Lincoln and the Indians, by Dr. David Nichols. Recently Mark Diedrich, an independent historian, has written a study of Little Crow and the Dakota War. These two historians have found out that there was a period of great corruption which continually affected the Treaty relationship between the Dakota and the U.S. government. Furthermore, there was a concerted cover-up by people at the time and later historians ( either knowing or unknowingly ) to protect people that were involved in this corruption. Thus, the Dakota have always been blamed unfairly for the war of 1862. The way the government conducted their Indian affairs was referred to by Bishop Henry Whipple as ” The Indian System “

About the Director:

Sheldon P. Wolfchild is a member of the Lower Sioux Indian Community who has appeared in a number of feature Films and television shows. Wolfchild researched the history of Dakota people in Minnesota and interviewed elders for over 15 years for his documentary film “Star Dreamers – The Spirit Water People.” The film weaves oral and written history and traditional Dakota beliefs together to offer a telling of the Dakota story in a way that text books he grew up reading never did.

Place: Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

Time: 6:30-9:30 pm

  • 6:30-7:00 Introductions
  • Screening begins at 7:00
  • Discussion follows

All events are free to the public.

Thank you to our sponsorsFacilitating Racial Equity Collaborative, the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, Facilitating Racial Equity Collaborative, Brotherhood Brew, SPIN: Saint Paul Interfaith Network, and Discussions That Encounter.

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Dakota 38

November 2, 2012:

Place: Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South

All events are free to the public.

4-5:30 Past, Present, Future: Presentation on Dakota History and Vision

Speakers include: Dale Weston (Dakota) and Jim Rock (Dakota). Hosted by Augsburg Indigenous Student Association President, Rikki Dalton

5:30-7:00 Reception hosted by American Indian Student Services in the Music Hall atrium next to Sateren Auditorium.

7:00-9:30 Screening of Dakota 38 (Smooth Feather Productions, 2012)

Screening and discussion with co-filmmaker and producer Sarah Weston, moderated by Dale Weston.

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Dakota 38 is a documentary about Jim Miller’s experience in 2005. “A Native spiritual leader and Vietnam veteran, [Jim] found himself in a dream riding on horseback across the great plains of South Dakota. Just before he awoke, he arrived at a riverbank in Minnesota and saw 38 of his Dakota ancestors hanged. At the time, Jim knew nothing of the largest mass execution in United States history, ordered by Abraham Lincoln on December 26, 1862. “When you have dreams, you know when they come from the creator… As any recovered alcoholic, I made believe that I didn’t get it. I tried to put it out of my mind, yet it’s one of those dreams that bothers you night and day.”

Now, four years later, embracing the message of the dream, Jim and a group of riders retrace the 330-mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution. “We can’t blame the wasichus anymore. We’re doing it to ourselves. We’re selling drugs. We’re killing our own people. That’s what this ride is about, is healing.” This is the story of their journey- the blizzards they endure, the Native and Non-Native communities that house and feed them along the way, and the dark history they are beginning to wipe away.” (http://smoothfeather.org/dakota38/#!prettyPhoto/0/)

Thank you to our sponsors: the American Indian Studies Department, the Augsburg Native American Film Series, American Indian Student Services Program, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, the Department of History, and the Department of Religion

 

Where Condor Meets Eagle: three night film festival

March 16-18, 2012

RoundLogoAugsburg Native American Film Series in collaboration with Phillips Indian Educators and the Parkway Theater present: Where Condor Meets Eagle: Indigenous Bolivian and Native American Film Festival and Cultural Exchange

Screening Location: Parkway Theater, 4814 Chicago Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55407 (612-822-3030).

FREE Admission

We are proud to present Where Condor Meets Eagle: Indigenous Bolivian and Native American Film Festival and Cultural Exchange, a three-night film festival celebrating Indigenous film, collaborations across national boundaries, and visual storytelling. Continue reading

NDN Shorts: Native American Film Series hosted by Elizabeth Day

April 13, 2011

MandPresented by The Augsburg Native American Film Series and the American Culture & Difference Program at the University of St. Thomas

NDN Shorts: Native American Film Series hosted by Elizabeth Day

This evening of films follows a nouveau comedy theme and will highlight the short films:

“Smoke Break” – Director Sally Kewayosh

“Cousins” – Director Sally Kewayosh

“Other Halves” – Director Migizi Pensoneau

“Scared Talk” – Director Migizi Pensoneau and Dallas Goldtooth

Screening Place: John Roach Center Auditorium (JRC 126)

University of St. Thomas

2115 Summit Avenue, Saint Paul, Minnesota

Free admission

6:30-8 p.m.

For more information contact Lois Dament at ACD@stthomas.edu or 651-962-5649

Sponsored by the American Culture & Difference Program, College of Arts and Sciences

Club Native (Tracey Deer, 2008)

March 2, 2011

Club Native (Tracey Deer, 2008)

Tracey1Hosted by Tracey Deer and Jennifer Machiorlatti

6:30-7:00 p.m. Reception sponsored by Women’s Studies

7:00-10:00 p.m. Film Screening

Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall

715 22nd Ave South

Film events are free

Club Native is a candid and deeply moving look at the pain, confusion and frustration suffered by many First Nations people as they struggle for the most important right of all: the right to belong.

On the Mohawk reserve of Kahnawake, located just outside the city of Montreal, Canada, there are two firm but unspoken rules drummed into every member of the community: do not marry a white person, and do not have a child with a white person. The potential consequences of ignoring these rules—loss of membership on the reserve for yourself and your child—are clear, and for those who incur them, devastating. Break the rules, and you also risk being perceived as having betrayed the Mohawk Nation by diluting the “purity” of the bloodline.

In Club Native, filmmaker Tracey Deer uses Kahnawake, her hometown, as a lens to probe deeply into the history and contemporary reality of Aboriginal identity. Following the stories of four women, she reveals the exclusionary attitudes that divide the community and many others like it across Canada. Deer traces the roots of the problem, from the advent of the highly discriminatory Indian Act through the controversy of Bill C31, up to the present day, where membership on the reserve is determined by a council of Mohawk elders, whose rulings often appear inconsistent. And with her own home as a poignant case study, she raises a difficult question faced by people of many ethnicities across the world: What roles do bloodline and culture play in determining identity?

Tracey Deer, Director

Mohawk filmmaker Tracey Deer is rapidly gaining a reputation as one of Canada’s finest chroniclers of modern Aboriginal life. She co-directed the feature-length documentary One More River(Rezolution Pictures) about the 2003 agreement between the Cree and Quebec. In 2004, she madeMohawk Girls (Rezolution Pictures/The National Film Board of Canada), a moving portrait of three teenage girls coming of age on her home reserve of Kahnawake, just outside of Montreal.

Tracey graduated in film studies at Dartmouth College in 2000 where she shot, directed and edited three short films before receiving the 25th Anniversary Film and Television Award for overall achievement in film studies. Her films have been broadcast and screened across Canada.