THE LOGIC OF THE EXCEPTION by Anthony Warnick

October 19 – November 9, 2017

Christensen Center Gallery

Artist Talk: Wedneday, Oct. 18, 11:10 a.m. Christensen Center Gallery

 

In The Logic Of The Exception Anthony Warnick engages the ways contemporary society repeats the same problematic states of exemption that have persisted in the United States for three centuries. This is done through the deployment of objects from pop culture and approbation of the prison industrial supply chain.

Bio

Anthony Warnick lives and works in Cleveland, Ohio. Warnick holds a M.F.A. in Sculpture from the Cranbrook Academy of Art and a B.F.A. from Minneapolis College of Art and Design in Web + Multimedia Environments. His work has been exhibited in solo exhibitions and group shows across the United States at such institution as Katherine E. Nash Gallery at the University of Minnesota, The Soap Factory, Roy G Biv Gallery (Columbus, OH), SPACES (Cleveland, OH), Minneapolis Institute of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, and Cranbrook Museum of Art. He has been artist-in-residence at Elsewhere Museum (Greensboro, NC), SOMA (Mexico City), and Futurefarmers (San Francisco, CA). Also, he is the co-director for the alternative space The Muted Horn, a project space focused on bringing national and international artist to Cleveland, Ohio. His work is in public and private collections throughout North America.

Statement

My practice makes the viewer aware of the systems within which we operate. I commandeer appearances; treating art history as a database, retrieving and amalgamating for future creations.  This intentional remaking highlights the collaborative production of culture. Through borrowing, the context becomes the primary focus. The forms fall into two categories: objects and performances. I construct the objects from common, recognizable materials like drywall, 2x4s, plywood, newsprint, and cotton fabric. These material choices draw attention to the overlapping conditions we operate within, rather than the allure of the pieces. I augment these corporeal elements with intangible ones like bureaucratic procedures and archival records. My practice critiques and dovetails with our everyday. While the economic, political, or educational systems feel immutable, my work provides and produces poetic and symbolic paths of resistance.

 

Image: Still from “One Hundred And Fifty More“, 2017

 

 

Landscape Abstraction – Matthew Winkler

Landscape Abstraction by Matthew Winkler

November 14 – December 19, 2017

 

Matthew Winkler presents a new series of layered sculptures that explore the representation of place. Created with cut paper, wood, paint, and printed imagery, the works engage the gallery environment and set up an interplay physical and pictorial space and positive and negative form.

 

Artist Bio

Matthew Winkler creates multi-layered drawings and sculptures that are a poetic response to the built and natural world. He is a 2017 Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant recipient and a 2014 recipient of a Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council Individual Artist Grant. Matthew is adjunct faculty at Winona State University, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, and Riverland Community College. He completed a BA from Williams College in 2004 and an MFA from California State University Long Beach in 2011. Matthew grew up in New Jersey and currently lives and works in Rochester, MN.

 

Artist Statement

I’m interested in exploring an interplay of physical, pictorial and perceptual space in my work. I use cut paper, wood, paint, and printed material to make layered two and three-dimensional constructions. These works contain a shifting relationship between positive and negative form and engage with their environment, registering changes in light and shadow and allowing for different views within an exhibition space.

Experiences with specific landscapes and architectural spaces are the starting point for each construction. The places I choose to focus on often contain layers of meaning – personal as well as social or ecological histories. I use a distinct process of collage, digital manipulation, drawing/painting, subtraction, and accumulation. Through this process I allow the form of each work to appear over time. I consider the course of making of each work a metaphor for the complex process of understanding and assigning meaning to place. I would like viewers of my work to have a physical/sensory experience with the work first and then question what visual forms are being represented, deconstructed, or manipulated.

Contain Yourself – Allison Craver

Contain Yourself by Allison Craver

October 19 – November 9, 2017

Reception: Thursday, October 19, 6 – 8 p.m.

 

Through processes relying on endurance and care, Craver attempts to unravel the seemingly disparate images and observations that compel her: scar tissue, heavy blankets, capillary action, the warmth and weight of our bodies. The sculptures presented in Contain Yourself are the result of her labor.

 

Artist Statement

I want to articulate how material and form have the potential to simultaneously elicit tenderness, familiarity, and alienation. Through material investigation and labor intensive processes, my thoughts become sculpture.

I find comfort in making, physically manifesting contemplation through labor. Though a gesture of generosity, the process is also compulsive, carrying the weight of an obligation. I am continuously navigating this dichotomy, negotiating the needs of my work with my own capacity to give; I empathize with the nurse. I feel deeply connected to and profoundly detached from the things I make, like a vital organ tethered outside of my body.

Bio

Allison Rose Craver (1988) grew up in East Aurora, NY. She received an MFA from Ohio State University in 2017, and holds a BFA from New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Allison’s work is process driven, utilizing ceramics materials in conjunction with fiber and found objects to explore the nature of care and labor. She currently lives and makes in Saint Paul, MN.

Susan Boecher – Artist Statement & Bio

Boecher ArtworkNOW by Susan Boecher

 

Artist Statement

The shock, fear, and disbelief one feels after receiving a cancer diagnosis is difficult to articulate. Those who have cancer or overcome it understand the vulnerability, uncertainty and emotional rollercoaster that it creates. Once diagnosed, to remember life as assumed and normal is no longer an option.

In November 2015, I was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer, a value-laden cancer that is the most fatal of all cancers. It accounts for approximately 1 in 4 cancer deaths annually and was expected to cause 158,080 deaths in 2016.

At the time, the doctors were encouraged by the size and timing of discovering the node. They suggested a possible curative outcome and prescribed an aggressive six-month treatment plan that included chemotherapy and radiation to both lung and brain. Despite their optimism my response was quite the opposite: anger, sadness, fear, disbelief, shock, confusion and an overall lack of control. Although I thought that a variety of profound experiences had taught me resiliency and mindfulness, this diagnosis was, in some sense, the most difficult because it forced an immediate examination of my own mortality and death in a manner that felt real and more imminent. Because social issues and personal experience have always inspired my creative work, I knew I had little choice but to use my diagnosis to create a new body of work.

NOW is an installation of color photographs and three-dimensional objects which presents the physical and emotional transitions I encountered during both private and public moments while in treatment and recovery. This work attempts to challenge conventional notions of cancer by presenting a perspective that is in turn personal, investigative and confrontational but also playful, positive and at times irreverent.

While a series of self-portraits simultaneously depicts horror and disbelief, other prints present the inescapable nightmares, dreams, and fantasies that have been equally pervasive. An installation of radiation masks as wall mounts, mounds of fallen hair and broken eggshells challenge the viewer to confront the harsh realities during and after treatment. Cancer fortune cookies, Wooly Willy and Magic Eight Balls, all childhood games of chance, lend a playful air and provide a less weighty perspective of cancer.

NOW challenges traditional cancer perceptions and stigmas attached to cancer with a non-traditional creative approach. It presents evocative visuals with elements of play to underscore life’s uncertainty without being cathartic or overly sentimental.

A year and a half after diagnosis, I now live in three-month increments where CT scans determine my next step. As a result I have developed a profound appreciation and gratitude for time, strive to assume little and take even less for granted.

With cancer there is no looking forward or turning back, only NOW.

 

Bio

Susan Boecher’s creative practice spans over 20 years and continues to emphasize social research and activism through community-driven photography. She established OverExposure, a media arts nonprofit that partners photographers with nonprofit groups on theme-specific photography projects.

DOWAGERS by JOHANNA WINTERS – Artist Statement & Bio

wintersposterimage

 

Opening: Friday, March 3, 6 – 8 p.m.

Gage Gallery, Oren Gateway Center

 

Artist Statement
My work behaves as playful coping rituals for anxieties about aging, vanity, shame, and disappointment. I use elements of animation, printmaking, and puppetry to concoct an elixir of discomfort and delight. This coupling of unfamiliarity and recognizability is seductive in the belly.

My recent performative puppet/figure work, Dowagers, explores ideas about control and play through a pair of reclusive sisterly spinsters who manage to encounter glee despite their strange condition. 


Artist Bio
Johanna Winters hails from Minneapolis, MN, and is currently a candidate in the MFA printmaking program at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. She has worked as the Education Manager at Highpoint Center for Printmaking in Minneapolis, taught printmaking as an Associate Lecturer at UW-Green Bay, and recently completed a puppetry residency at the Open Eye Figure Theatre in Minneapolis. Her work has been included in national juried exhibitions, print biennials, and portfolios.

Kate Roberts – Artist Statement & Bio

Kate Roberts – Bowing

Artist Statement

My practice is a meditation on time and its role in the decay of objects and memories. Inspiration is drawn from historical objects, the architecture around me, or a personal relationship. My processes are repetitive and labor intensive; I draw, construct, and weave using materials to depict fleeting, fragile moments and to examine the temporary physicality of an object or idea. I create work to find the beauty and the unrest in this temporal state.

Artist Bio

Kate Roberts is native of Greenville, South Carolina. She received both her MFA and BFA at Alfred University in 2015 and 2010 respectively. She has completed residencies at Archie Bray Foundation for Ceramic Arts in Helena, MT, Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Colorado, La Meridiana in Italy, and Le Cite International des Arts in Paris. Her work has been exhibited at the Tampa Art Museum in Tampa, FL and Everson Museum in Syracuse, NY; major exhibitions include the 69th Scripps Ceramic Annual, the 2011 and 2015 NCECA Biennial, and Ceramic Top 40. She is currently a Lecturer of Ceramics at University of Washingto

Eileen Cohen – Artist Statement

Ceramic Tiles

Artist Statement

 

For the Frill of It

As a ceramic artist, I am committed to exploring clay as an expressive material. Its tactile quality, rich history, and utilitarian, sculptural, and decorative applications continually inspire me. For the Frill of It references clay roof tiles, a practical springboard to make something impractical — ruffled tiles.

This project began as a daydream over a year ago. I imagined myself very small and standing under a giant ballerina’s tutu. Surrounded and enveloped by her tutu, I was swept by the beauty of her skirt. It wasn’t until I revisited this daydream that I began to recognize the strength, power, and grace of the ballerina.

In the studio, ideas of luxury and excess and how they translate through fashion and dress initially inspired my research. Through a reductive process in which I removed more and more information, a ruffled tile remained. As I began constructing the ruffles and testing fit and installation methods, the similarity to clay roof tiles was evident. The connection to a roof, its purpose to provide protection, added layers to the ruffles, not only in physical assembly but in meaning. This association deepened my exploration of what is viewed as feminine and masculine and how they support and/or oppose one another.

The production of the tiles was systematic. The repetitive tasks and months of studio time allowed for an internal dialogue about investment of time and effort, practicality, and triviality. As the work increased in size and scope, it began to take on a life of its own and I no longer questioned my commitment to it or its value.

For the Frill of It has been a transformative journey. Through the enormity of the project and commitment required, I continually examined and reflected on my evolving relationship to the work. My hope with this work is to impart warmth, softness, and strength.

This project was made possible by the support of friends and family for which I am truly grateful. I wish to thank Jenny Wheatley for her trust, support, and encouragement and Peter Hannah for his expertise, guidance, and assistance. In addition, I would like to thank Katie Smith, Linda Dobosenki, Anne Wendland, Seth Eberle, Brian Antonich, Sarah Ostrum Reis, Stacie Schlomer Totzke, Kimberlee Joy Roth, Trygve Nordberg, Alyssa Baguss, and others who graciously donated their time and effort to make this project happen.

-Eileen Cohen

 

THE WONDER PROJECT

wonderproject

THE WONDER PROJECT – Art 226: Artist Workshop with Anne Baumgartner

The Wonder Project is a multi-layered art endeavor. Part social outreach and part visual celebration, the project hopes to create curiosity, conversation and new connections between the Augsburg campus and surrounding neighbors. Students in Art 226: Artist Workshop class are walking Seward and Cedar Riverside sidewalks to meet people and gather images and thoughts around the phrase, “I wonder_____.”   The same questions are being explored in campus spaces and groups. Visiting artist Anne Baumgartner arrives on October 12 to direct art workshops and construction for the Fence installation on 21st Ave. This will be a re-purposed outdoor art collage that responds to what we’ve heard and seen.

A Wonder-Celebration event will happen on Thursday, October 20th from noon to 1:30 p.m. All are invited to attend and participate.

 

Anne Baumgartner Bio

Anne Baumgartner is a mixed media artist living and working in Los Angeles. Born in Seattle, WA, she received a BA in Art Ed from the University of Washington and an MFA from LUCAD/Art Institute of Boston in 2010. She has worked all over the the country as her family moved from Seattle to New Jersey to Minneapolis and to LA. She raised three children with her husband Dan and taught art in the public schools and at Seattle Pacific University as an adjunct professor. Throughout her teaching career, she has maintained an art practice with sales and commissions in design, painting and mixed media. Anne now lives in LA (since 2010), combining a rigorous studio practice with contract and volunteer art teaching. In the last six years, she has exhibited in independant galleries, Concordia University, Barnsdall Park/ LA Municipal Gallery, Fuller Seminary, Biola University and a rogue fence installation.

Baumgartner’s art practice investigates the dynamics of social politics at work in the urban landscape. Her work uses common shapes/ symbols and repurposed elements to activate unnoticed, spaces and grids. Layering cardboard and found supplies to make quirky and accessible collages, she creates visual interventions, even installing artwork outdoors on neighborhood fences or walls. The familiar materials invite viewers in and raise questions.

 

Megan Vossler – Artist Statement & Bio

 

vosslerlifejacket

Artist statement

Dante’s epic poem Inferno is an allegorical account of the weight of human transgression, and its complex metaphorical richness has enduring resonance. Nine “circles” of hell are described, each corresponding with sins of escalating consequence. In Dante’s story, the circles occupy distinct physical terrain, and the landscape itself is presented as vividly as the human and mythical characters are. Physical forces—the effects of rain, wind, and sleet, the perilous nature of mud and ice, and the pull of gravity—all become part of the narrative. Water, especially, functions as both a connective element and a source of mortal danger, exemplified by the treacherous swamps, marshes and depths of the river Styx. My work in Terra Firma explores these metaphors and dissonances through a contemporary lens.

 

Bio
Megan Vossler received her BA from Brown University and her MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Her work has been exhibited nationwide, including shows at the Minneapolis Institue of Art and the de Young Museum in San Francisco. Megan has been a recipient of several prestigious awards, including a Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Artists, a McKnight Artists Fellowship for Visual Artists, a Jerome Foundation Travel and Study grant, and two Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grants. She currently serves on the curatorial panel at Soo Visual Arts Center, and teaches drawing at Macalester College.

TERRA FIRMA by Megan Vossler

Vossler Postcard Image

TErra Firma
Megan Vossler

August 29 – October 27, 2016
Reception: September 16, 6-8 p.m.

In this exhibition of new drawings and sculpture, Vossler reflects on the narrative of Dante’s Inferno, specifically exploring how the metaphor of water functions as both a connective element and a source of danger.

Gage Family Art Gallery

 

Artist statement: Dante’s epic poem Inferno is an allegorical account of the weight of human transgression, and its complex metaphorical richness has enduring resonance. Nine “circles” of hell are described, each corresponding with sins of escalating consequence. In Dante’s story, the circles occupy distinct physical terrain, and the landscape itself is presented as vividly as the human and mythical characters are. Physical forces—the effects of rain, wind, and sleet, the perilous nature of mud and ice, and the pull of gravity—all become part of the narrative. Water, especially, functions as both a connective element and a source of mortal danger, exemplified by the treacherous swamps, marshes and depths of the river Styx. My work in Terra Firma explores these metaphors and dissonances through a contemporary lens.

Bio: Megan Vossler received her BA from Brown University and her MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Her work has been exhibited nationwide, including shows at the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the de Young Museum in San Francisco. Megan has been a recipient of several prestigious awards, including a Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Artists, a McKnight Artists Fellowship for Visual Artists, a Jerome Foundation Travel and Study grant, and two Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grants. She currently serves on the curatorial panel at Soo Visual Arts Center, and teaches drawing at Macalester College.