Overlook / Sugar Street by Brett Kallusky

Brett Kallusky Show Image

Overlook / Sugar Street by Brett Kallusky

April 26 – July 31, 2018

Reception: April 26, 6 – 8 p.m.

 

Brett Kallusky will exhibit photographic prints and sculpture from his ongoing project: Overlook / Sugar Street. The exhibition explores one microcosm in the nascent economy of renewable energy—that of the Santa Maria Landfill, and the surrounding landscape —  which is part of a much larger cycle of land management, consumption, and waste.

 

Bio

Brett Kallusky is an assistant professor in the Art Department at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls where he teaches photography. He has been the recipient of two Minnesota State Arts Board Grants, a Fulbright to Italy, and a Fulbright Travel Grant. His work has been exhibited regionally, nationally and internationally in solo and group exhibitions. Kallusky has been a regular student portfolio reviewer at SPE (Society for Photographic Education) national conferences since 2012. He lives and maintains his studio practice in Minneapolis, MN.

Q & A with Allison Rose Craver – Contain Yourself

 

What prompted your interest in creating work about the body?

My interest in the body revealed itself over time. In the beginning it was not a conscious pursuit. As I generated more and more work, however, the body was an obvious thematic pattern. I choose to embrace it. My personal history includes caregiving, and I have been witness to a great deal of physical pain. So, it makes sense that my work would reflect this preoccupation.

 

 

What is your process for choosing materials and the scale for a particular piece?

I usually start with a material that I am drawn to. Whether it is fiber or a specific clay body, I won’t understand its role in my studio practice until I have spent time playing with it and exploring all of its properties. This process could happen very quickly, or it might take many months of rumination. But eventually I will realize how the material relates to my conceptual interests, and a piece will follow. The process is very intuitive. In terms of scale, I often make work that relates to the size of my own body. I also appreciate making work that acknowledges my physical limitations; I am unlikely to make something that I can’t lift or move myself. I enjoy feeling autonomous, especially in the context of my studio.

 

 

To what extent do you plan out a piece before executing it?

While I might plan something in the beginning, this is usually just a strategy to get myself started. As soon as I begin working I am looking for moments that hold potential, and I am always open to changing the piece. The work is the result of a process – I can’t relate to the idea of ‘executing’ a piece. It would be more accurate to describe the idea as fuel: it gets burned off.

 

 

What research is informing your current work?

My work draws from my personal experiences and an eclectic mix of readings, observations, artworks, and stories. Research is important because it gives work context and keeps it relevant, but my work and research interests are not linear. I spent a lot of time in graduate school reading about nursing and other forms of caregiving. I was fascinated with Florence Nightingale.

 

 

What have you learned in the process of creating this work?

Preparing for this show has been challenging! I just graduated from Ohio State
University and moved across the country, so I have been learning about the challenges of working, living, and art-making outside of a structured academic setting.

 

 

How do you go about titling your pieces?
I spend time reading the dictionary, looking up words that seem relevant to a particular piece. I like pulling apart definitions and finding linguistic connections. I try to keep titles simple and let the works speak for themselves.

 

 

What is the most necessary and/or important item in your studio and why?

This is a really tough question! I can’t think of anything I couldn’t do without. I like to believe that my practice doesn’t rely on anything besides my hands and my curiosity.

 

 

How do you seek inspiration for a new series?

It is difficult for me to break my work into series or discrete investigations. Each piece builds on the last, and the work is a continuum. When I need inspiration I usually don’t have to look further than my studio table. If things feel stale, spending time in the world and reading will help me see older work from a fresh perspective. I am always making work about the same things – always trying to answer the same questions. Again and again.

 

Questions by Gallery Assistant Kristen Holmberg

Biennial Alumni Show – 2017

August 29 – October 14: gage & Christensen Gallery

Reception: October 12, 6 – 8 p.m. Awards @ 7 p.m. Oren Gateway Lobby

 

JUROR

Nicole Watson is the director of The Catherine G. Murphy Gallery at St. Catherine University, where she is committed to showcasing artwork grounded in women’s perspectives. She studied studio art, graphic design and art history at St. Kate’s and the University of St. Thomas, where she earned her B.A. in 2001. She received an M.A. in art and architectural history from St. Thomas in 2008; her thesis uncovered and examined the work of Marion Alice Parker (1873-1935), the only female Prairie School architect in the Minneapolis firm of Purcell & Elmslie. Formerly the manager of Groveland Gallery in Minneapolis, Watson also specializes in contemporary paintings by Minnesota and regional artists.

 

Image: Nancy Baker, Traveling, Monotype Print, 2017

Heritage – Alonso Sierralta

The artwork in this exhibition explores the visual relationship created by combining natural and manufactured elements. This combination is meant to appear grafted and somewhat uncomfortable. This tension and the forms I utilize are intended to reference ideas of transplantation, migration and change.

Chelsea, MA: All America City – Mark Morelli

 

Artist Statement

My project is an ever evolving, multidimensional look at Chelsea, Massachusetts, the city where I live. It is the smallest city in Massachusetts, measuring just 2.5 square miles, yet has a population of at least 40 thousand people. Chelsea has historically been a landing spot for new immigrants which makes it a city continuously in flux. The project was initially conceived as a photographic exploration of the ordinary and everyday within this small dense urban environment but it has expanded into a narrative portrait of a specific place and time. Chelsea is a Sanctuary City and has also twice received the All America City Award from the National Civic League. At a time when immigrants are being demonized and the idea of ‘who is an American’ is fiercely contested it feels more vital than ever to explore and document overlapping layers of history, culture, and architecture, to try to define both a singular city in transition and my own personal sense of place.

 

Image: Orlando, Chelsea, MA, 2008, Gelatin Silver Print, 17×17

THE LOGIC OF THE EXCEPTION by Anthony Warnick

October 19 – November 9, 2017

Christensen Center Gallery

Artist Talk: Wedneday, Oct. 18, 11:10 a.m. Christensen Center Gallery

 

In The Logic Of The Exception Anthony Warnick engages the ways contemporary society repeats the same problematic states of exemption that have persisted in the United States for three centuries. This is done through the deployment of objects from pop culture and approbation of the prison industrial supply chain.

Bio

Anthony Warnick lives and works in Cleveland, Ohio. Warnick holds a M.F.A. in Sculpture from the Cranbrook Academy of Art and a B.F.A. from Minneapolis College of Art and Design in Web + Multimedia Environments. His work has been exhibited in solo exhibitions and group shows across the United States at such institution as Katherine E. Nash Gallery at the University of Minnesota, The Soap Factory, Roy G Biv Gallery (Columbus, OH), SPACES (Cleveland, OH), Minneapolis Institute of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, and Cranbrook Museum of Art. He has been artist-in-residence at Elsewhere Museum (Greensboro, NC), SOMA (Mexico City), and Futurefarmers (San Francisco, CA). Also, he is the co-director for the alternative space The Muted Horn, a project space focused on bringing national and international artist to Cleveland, Ohio. His work is in public and private collections throughout North America.

Statement

My practice makes the viewer aware of the systems within which we operate. I commandeer appearances; treating art history as a database, retrieving and amalgamating for future creations.  This intentional remaking highlights the collaborative production of culture. Through borrowing, the context becomes the primary focus. The forms fall into two categories: objects and performances. I construct the objects from common, recognizable materials like drywall, 2x4s, plywood, newsprint, and cotton fabric. These material choices draw attention to the overlapping conditions we operate within, rather than the allure of the pieces. I augment these corporeal elements with intangible ones like bureaucratic procedures and archival records. My practice critiques and dovetails with our everyday. While the economic, political, or educational systems feel immutable, my work provides and produces poetic and symbolic paths of resistance.

 

Image: Still from “One Hundred And Fifty More“, 2017