Heritage – Alonso Sierralta

The artwork in this exhibition explores the visual relationship created by combining natural and manufactured elements. This combination is meant to appear grafted and somewhat uncomfortable. This tension and the forms I utilize are intended to reference ideas of transplantation, migration and change.

Chelsea, MA: All American City – Mark Morelli

This project is a multidimensional portrait of the city where I live – a visual investigation of a complex industrial city, as well as an attempt to define my own personal sense of place.

Image: Orlando, Chelsea, MA, 2008, Gelatin Silver Print, 17×17

Matthew Winkler

Matthew Winkler presents a new series of layered sculptures that explore the representation of place. Created with cut paper, wood, paint, and printed imagery, the works engage the gallery environment and set up an interplay physical and pictorial space and positive and negative form.

Contain Yourself – Allison Craver

 

Through processes relying on endurance and care, Craver attempts to unravel the seemingly disparate images and observations that compel her: scar tissue, heavy blankets, capillary action, the warmth and weight of our bodies. The sculptures presented in Contain Yourself are the result of her labor.

An Ache for Home – Selma Fernández Richter

 

Selma Fernández Richter, originally for Mexico, has been documenting recent immigrants to the Twin Cities who have been displaced from their country of origin by war, violence, and famine. Her project The Ache for Home is a meditation on her own experience of adapting to a new life and home in Minnesota.

 

Kamilo Noor, Minneapolis, MN, 2011, Archival pigment print, 20 x 20 in

Kamilo Mohamud Noor sitting on the porch of her new house in Minneapolis. She and 5 of her siblings where born in a refugee camp in Kenya. Her mother and older brother were born in Somalia. They arrived to Minnesota in 2011.

Call for Entries: Alumni Show 2017

 

 

The Augsburg Art Galleries are now accepting entries of recent work for the next Alumni Show – Deadline August 1

 

ELIGIBILITY

Open to all alumni of Augsburg College

ENTRIES

  • Each artist may submit up to 3 images
  • Artwork needs to have been made since our last alumni show (2015 or later)
  • Email the images along with the Alumni Submission Form to gallery@augsburg.edu

DEADLINE

August 1: Deadline for entries

AWARD

Top prize is $1,000

Susan Boecher – Artist Statement & Bio

Boecher ArtworkNOW by Susan Boecher

 

Artist Statement

The shock, fear, and disbelief one feels after receiving a cancer diagnosis is difficult to articulate. Those who have cancer or overcome it understand the vulnerability, uncertainty and emotional rollercoaster that it creates. Once diagnosed, to remember life as assumed and normal is no longer an option.

In November 2015, I was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer, a value-laden cancer that is the most fatal of all cancers. It accounts for approximately 1 in 4 cancer deaths annually and was expected to cause 158,080 deaths in 2016.

At the time, the doctors were encouraged by the size and timing of discovering the node. They suggested a possible curative outcome and prescribed an aggressive six-month treatment plan that included chemotherapy and radiation to both lung and brain. Despite their optimism my response was quite the opposite: anger, sadness, fear, disbelief, shock, confusion and an overall lack of control. Although I thought that a variety of profound experiences had taught me resiliency and mindfulness, this diagnosis was, in some sense, the most difficult because it forced an immediate examination of my own mortality and death in a manner that felt real and more imminent. Because social issues and personal experience have always inspired my creative work, I knew I had little choice but to use my diagnosis to create a new body of work.

NOW is an installation of color photographs and three-dimensional objects which presents the physical and emotional transitions I encountered during both private and public moments while in treatment and recovery. This work attempts to challenge conventional notions of cancer by presenting a perspective that is in turn personal, investigative and confrontational but also playful, positive and at times irreverent.

While a series of self-portraits simultaneously depicts horror and disbelief, other prints present the inescapable nightmares, dreams, and fantasies that have been equally pervasive. An installation of radiation masks as wall mounts, mounds of fallen hair and broken eggshells challenge the viewer to confront the harsh realities during and after treatment. Cancer fortune cookies, Wooly Willy and Magic Eight Balls, all childhood games of chance, lend a playful air and provide a less weighty perspective of cancer.

NOW challenges traditional cancer perceptions and stigmas attached to cancer with a non-traditional creative approach. It presents evocative visuals with elements of play to underscore life’s uncertainty without being cathartic or overly sentimental.

A year and a half after diagnosis, I now live in three-month increments where CT scans determine my next step. As a result I have developed a profound appreciation and gratitude for time, strive to assume little and take even less for granted.

With cancer there is no looking forward or turning back, only NOW.

 

Bio

Susan Boecher’s creative practice spans over 20 years and continues to emphasize social research and activism through community-driven photography. She established OverExposure, a media arts nonprofit that partners photographers with nonprofit groups on theme-specific photography projects.