Star Tribune reports Augsburg’s transition to test-optional admissions

The Star Tribune‘s Maura Lerner covered Augsburg’s new test-optional admissions policy.

“The change is designed to level the playing field for those without the money or time to get private tutors, take prep classes or take the exam multiple times,” said Nate Gorr, interim vice president of Augsburg admissions, in the article. “It’s also a recognition that standardized tests don’t always capture a student’s potential, and can discourage good candidates from applying to college.”

Lerner noted that according to the National Center for Fair and Open Testing, many of the 274 test-optional colleges saw an increase in diversity without any loss in academic quality.

Read the full article at the Star Tribune website.

Economics professor Jeanne Boeh discusses vacation day usage on WCCO

Jeanne Boeh on WCCO
Jeanne Boeh on WCCO

When WCCO reporter Christiane Cordero wanted to know why Americans are taking more vacation, she interviewed Augsburg economics professor Jeanne Boeh.

“The unemployment rate is at a 17-year low” said Boeh, chair of Augsburg’s business administration department. “It’s even lower in Minnesota. People are feeling more confident.”

WCCO reported that a recent study by the U.S. Travel Association found that the average number of vacation day usage among Americans has hit a seven-year high, at 17.2 days. Most days off are being used for chores.

The study also found that 52 percent of Americans have vacation time left at the end the year. Why? “Some of those are self-employed,” Boeh told WCCO. “Think about it. If you’re just starting a business, if you go off for two weeks, you lose two weeks of income.”

Watch full video on WCCO’s website.

Augsburg psychology professor Bridget Robinson-Riegler talks with the Pioneer Press about TV’s “Reminiscence Bump”

The Pioneer Press reports that there is no question the ’00 are back in television. Given the high demand for reboots, relaunches and remakes, Ross Raihala, of the Pioneer Press, interviewed Augsburg psychology professor Bridget Robinson-Riegler about what she describes as a “reminiscence bump.”

“Most memories come from age 10 to age 30 or so,” said Robinson-Riegler, in the article. Many network executives are of an age where some of their most potent memories formed around the turn of the century, thus the oncoming tide of ’00s throwbacks, she told the Pioneer Press.

Recent hit television revivals include Trading Spaces, Will and Grace, and Queer Eye and movie sequels such as Super Troopers 2 and Incredibles 2.

“One of the main things nostalgia does is help people find meaning in life and to connect with other people,” Robinson-Riegler said. “When you’re connected to other people, life has meaning. Nostalgia makes people feel protected, loved and happy. People even feel physically warmer.”

Read the full article at the Pioneer Press here.

Augsburg adopts test-optional admissions policy

Augsburg University is introducing a pilot test-optional admissions policy.

Submission of ACT or SAT test scores for admission is optional for fall 2019 incoming undergraduate (first-year and transfer) student applicants, except in specific circumstances.

“The test-optional admission policy aligns with Augsburg’s mission of intentional diversity and is expected to increase the University’s pool of completed applicants each year,” said Nate Gorr, interim vice president of enrollment management.

For a number of student populations, standardized test scores may not reflect an accurate indication of academic ability — including, for example, people without access to test preparation courses and tutors; those who can’t afford to retake the test; people with learning and physical differences, and English language learners.

This also aligns with Augsburg‘s holistic admissions process, which looks at quantitative metrics and beyond. The application-review process allows Augsburg to maintain the University’s academic standards and ensure Augsburg admits students with the capacity to succeed here.

Faculty, earlier in April, approved the test-optional admissions change recommended by the University Council Enrollment Committee and endorsed by the Faculty Senate and the Academic Affairs Committee.

For additional information about the test-optional process, see A-mail post.

News reports: Augsburg professor challenges Economist ranking Minneapolis third most expensive in North America

 

Jeanne Boeh talks to Kare11
Jeanne Boeh talks with Kare11

When The Economist named Minneapolis the third most expensive city to live in North America, just after New York and Los Angeles, reporters from Kare11, Fox 9, and WCCO turned to Augsburg University Professor of Economics Jeanne Boeh for answers. Kare 11’s Gordon Severson questioned the ranking, given that the latest U.S. Census data listed Minneapolis as the 46th most populated city. The Economist study analyzed 150 items such as food, utility bills, rent, and private schools, but left out the cost of owning a home.

Boeh, also chair of the Business Administration department at Augsburg, argues that the study isn’t exactly accurate. “It doesn’t really reflect the average experience of the people who are living here right now,” Boeh tells Kare 11. “If I go to San Francisco, which technically we’re supposed to be more expensive than, the average cost of a house is well over half a million dollars. So, it doesn’t really make sense that Minneapolis would cost more to live in.”

While the study’s measures may be more applicable for high-end executives who travel internationally, Boeh says it’s not an accurate representation when it comes to the average Minnesotan.

See full story on the Kare 11 website.

Related articles: WCCO, Fox 9

See full report from The Economist on The Economist website.

Augsburg’s Board of Regents honored for leadership

The Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges logo

Augsburg’s Board of Regents was awarded the 2017 John W. Nason Award for Board Leadership for efforts including initiating an inclusive, five-year strategic planning effort and leading the institution’s largest-ever capital campaign. The formal recognition is to come in April at the Association of Governing Board of Universities and Colleges National Conference on Trusteeship held in San Francisco. This year’s honorees were chosen from about 40 nominations nationwide.

“Traditionally, governing boards have stayed out of the public eye except when something goes wrong,” said Richard Legon, president of the association’s board of directors. “But it is important that we honor the best of us, and inspire good governance practices in others. These boards’ stories represent some of the sharpest and most innovative thinking in the sector.”

Now in its third year, the award is named for higher education leader John W. Nason, recognizing his work as chair of the National Japanese American Student Relocation Council in helping more than 4,000 interned students continue their college studies across the U.S. during World War II.

Learn more about the award on the Association of Governing Board of Universities and Colleges website.

President Paul C. Pribbenow appointed to Governor’s Workforce Development Board

Minnesota Governor’s Workforce Development Board logoMinnesota Gov. Mark Dayton has appointed Augsburg University President Paul C. Pribbenow to a three-year term on the Governor’s Workforce Development Board. The board represents key leaders from business, education, labor, community-based organizations, and government to advise the governor on Minnesota’s workforce system.

“I’m proud to represent the state’s private higher education sector as a member of this board,” said Pribbenow, “and to have Augsburg engaged in an integrated effort linking government, employers, education, workforce centers, and employees to sustain a vibrant and equitable Minnesota economy.”

The board, which meets quarterly, analyzes and recommends workforce development policies to the governor and the Minnesota legislature to ensure a globally competitive labor pool for the state.

Learn more about the Governor’s Workforce Development Board on their website.

 

Star Tribune interviews finance professor Marc McIntosh about new Hagfors Center

Marc McIntosh, Finance professor

In a recent Star Tribune article, reporter Neal St. Anthony spoke with Marc McIntosh, professor of Finance at Augsburg University, about the new home for the business department at the Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion.

“It brings alive the course materials,” McIntosh said about the building’s state-of-the art technology. “This building is not just about studying stock-and-bond markets. … We’re active, including working with small business owners from Somalia and Ethiopia. We also work in the area of financial literacy. And also what really separates us is our diversity.”

The article also highlighted other attributes of Augsburg. “The university is best known for its inner-city location, solid academics and presidential recognition for community service; to say nothing of its MIAC-championship basketball team playing in the NCAA Division III tournament this weekend,” St. Anthony wrote.

 

Read full article on the Star Tribune website.

Augsburg named a top producer of U.S. Fulbright students

Fullbright logo

This February, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs included Augsburg University on the list of U.S. colleges and universities that produced the most 2017-2018 Fulbright U.S. students, ranking No. 9 among 22 master’s institutions. Top-producing institutions are highlighted annually in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Since 2007, Augsburg University has had 21 Fulbright students selected for their academic merit and leadership potential.

Visit the The Chronicle of Higher Education website to see full list of top producers.