City water line leak disrupts water service January 13, 2018, to Christensen Center

Update: Water service was restored to Christensen Center before 6 p.m. Saturday, January 13.

Earlier post:

A leak in the city water line that feeds Christensen Center was discovered around 10 p.m. Friday, January 12. Augsburg Facilities crew worked with the City of Minneapolis Water Department to shut the water off until the pipe can be repaired. As a result, there is no water service in Christensen. As of Saturday morning, January 13, we are still awaiting information about the timeline for repair, but there may not be water in Christensen for the weekend.

As a result, the following adjustments have been made to affected operations on January 13:

  • A’viands has made some menu and beverage modifications and adjusted its sanitation operations to ensure that students will continue to have quality foodservice in the Commons.
  • Nabo will be closed Saturday, January 13, so that A’viands can use that location for food preparation and dishwashing for the main dining facilities in Christensen Center.

 

Augsburg Works to Help McNally Smith Students Complete Degrees

McNally Smith College signFollowing the mid-December announcement that McNally Smith College of Music would be closing this December, Augsburg University teams have swung into action to support McNally Smith students seeking to transfer in order to complete their degrees.

Recognizing the urgency many McNally Smith students, including international students, are facing, Augsburg will enroll transfer students as quickly as this spring semester, which begins January 8.

“We will do our very best to assist students through this process as quickly as possible,” said Augsburg University Registrar Crystal Comer.

Augsburg and McNally Smith have an existing articulation agreement — a formal agreement that establishes transfer policies for specific courses or programs. Augsburg also is committed to carefully reviewing students’ courses that are not included in the articulation agreement for possible credit transfers.

Augsburg staff will be on site at McNally Smith this week to help student understand their options. McNally Smith students also are encouraged to schedule an appointment with a transfer counselor at Augsburg via the web site: www.augsburg.edu/transfer.

According to Augsburg Interim Vice President of Enrollment Management Nate Gorr, many McNally Smith students have already scheduled appointments. Students also can call or email questions to the Augsburg transfer team at transfer@augsburg.edu or 612-330-1001.

“People from across Augsburg — including faculty, academic advisors, admissions and housing staff, the registrar’s team, and student affairs — immediately began working to see how we could help McNally Smith transfer students when the announcement was made last week,” said Augsburg University President Paul Pribbenow. “Our hope is that our efforts and those of our sister schools will support all of McNally Smith’s remaining students in accomplishing their educational goals.”

 

KARE 11 discusses the legacy of discriminatory housing policies with the Mapping Prejudice Project

Three researchers seated in a long room with file cabinets and tables.
Kirsten Delegard and other Mapping Prejudice researchers talk with KARE 11 about their project.

In a conversation with KARE 11 Reporter Adrienne Broaddus, Kirsten Delegard, Augsburg University scholar-in-residence and director of the Mapping Prejudice project, discussed the lasting impact of historically discriminatory housing policies in Minneapolis.

“People think that because we didn’t have segregated water fountains or waiting rooms that we didn’t have segregation in Minneapolis,” she said, “but racial covenants determined who could live where … We are still living with the legacy of these policies. We can point to all kinds of disparities especially in area of home ownership that we are living with today because of these polices enforced over the last century.”

The Mapping Prejudice project, once complete, will be the first comprehensive map of racial covenants for a U.S. city. Watch the KARE 11 report about the project.

 

Minnesota Daily features the Mapping Prejudice Project’s work to uncover Minneapolis’ discriminatory housing past

Three researchers looking at a paper map of Minneapolis
Researchers in the Mapping Prejudice project review a Minneapolis map. Photo: Minnesota Daily

Under the Mapping Prejudice Project, scholars from the University of Minnesota and Augsburg University have analyzed over 1.4 million historic Minneapolis housing deeds, finding racist language in more 20,000 documents. These racial covenants forbidding the sale of property to people of color are no longer legally enforceable, but researchers hope documenting this side of the city’s history will influence urban planning in years to come.

This article describes the methods that the Mapping Prejudice researchers use to conduct their work and discusses the motivations for the project with project director and Augsburg scholar-in-residence Kirsten Delegard.

The research group plans to map Minneapolis by the end of 2017 and all of Hennepin County next year.

Read the full story at the Minnesota Daily News site.

Star Tribune talks to President Pribbenow about Mapping Prejudice project in South Minneapolis

Map of Minneapolis with color coding for regions with discriminatory residential policies
Screen shot of a time-progression map showing the growth of racially restrictive real estate covenants in the early 20th century.

Augsburg President Paul Pribbenow talks with the Star Tribune’s Randy Furst about how the Augsburg House — and much of South Minneapolis — were once governed by discriminatory housing policies. While the historical covenants are no longer legally binding, Augsburg is seeking a method to nullify the prohibition while still preserving the historical record, “so that we never lose sight of the actions that have segregated and repressed many,” Pribbenow said.

The findings about residential properties in South Minneapolis are part of the Mapping Prejudice project, led by a team of researchers from Augsburg and the University of Minnesota. For more information about the project, see Mapping Prejudice. Go to the Star Tribune article for information about other South Minneapolis homes, a perspective from a Minneapolis real estate lawyer, and an interactive map showing the growth of racially restrictive deeds across Minneapolis from 1910 to 1955.

Psychology Professor Bridget Robinson-Riegler talks to Star Tribune about memory and identity

Ferris wheel at night
The Midway at the Minnesota State Fair. Photo: Tom Wallace, Star Tribune

The Star Tribune’s John Reinan talks with Augsburg Psychology Professor Bridget Robinson-Riegler about how the Great Minnesota Get-Together “not only entertains us, excites us and exhausts us — it makes us Minnesotans.”

“Our identity is formed by our memories. Traditions and rituals are very important in identifying who we are,” said Robinson-Riegler, who specializes in the study of memory. “Families are based on shared experiences, and this is one of those shared experiences we have as a state. The State Fair becomes a collective experience. It gives us a sense of belonging, of togetherness.

“This is what we do as a state. It confirms our identity. It becomes who we are.”

Read the full article at the Star Tribune site.

New Dean to Advance Augsburg’s Commitments to Equity and Innovation in Professional Studies

Monica Devers to join Augsburg College as dean of Professional Studies in August

Monica C. Devers

(MINNEAPOLIS) — Augsburg College has named Monica C. Devers as dean of Professional Studies, responsible for graduate, adult undergraduate, and traditional undergraduate programs across an array of professional studies programs. Devers brings 14 years of collaborative leadership experience to this position, which oversees six academic disciplines: business administration; education; health, physical education, and exercise science; physician assistant studies; nursing; and social work. Devers also will provide vision and leadership for new program development and professional studies program assessment in her role at Augsburg.

Devers most recently served as the inaugural dean of Health and Human Services at St. Cloud State University. She will report to Provost Karen Kaivola at Augsburg.

“Monica shares Augsburg’s commitment to equity and inclusiveness, to grounding our work in student-centered learning, and to serving as a ‘steward of place’ in the community,” Kaivola said. “Her academic leadership in interdisciplinary collaboration will help define and shape Augsburg’s professional studies programs and enrich Augsburg’s transformative work in serving our diverse student populations.”

In March, Augsburg announced that it would become Augsburg University, effective September 1. The name change reflects the reality that Augsburg already offers nine graduate degree programs in addition to its more than 50 undergraduate degree programs. In announcing the name change, President Paul C. Pribbenow affirmed Augsburg’s dedication to providing students with direct faculty engagement and high-impact learning opportunities, including research, international study, internships, and discipline-specific field experiences.

“Augsburg’s leadership work in student success, community engagement, and economic development helps build and sustain the long-term vitality of our communities,” Devers said. “I am excited to join Augsburg in developing, growing, and enhancing programs that align with the institution’s mission and respond to local and regional needs.”

About Devers: Prior to joining Augsburg, Devers served as the inaugural dean of the School of Health and Human Services at St. Cloud State University. Devers joined St. Cloud State as a faculty member in 1998 and served as chair for the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders in the university’s College of Fine Arts and Humanities. Devers completed her Ph.D. and Master of Arts in communication sciences and disorders at the University of Minnesota. She also holds a Master of Arts in English and politics and a Master of Science in information technology from the University of Glasgow, Scotland. Devers is licensed by the Minnesota Department of Health in speech-language pathology and has worked as a speech-language pathologist at the University of Minnesota and for Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota..

About Augsburg: Augsburg College offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and nine graduate degrees to nearly 3,600 students of diverse backgrounds at its campus in the vibrant center of the Twin Cities and the Rochester site. Augsburg educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings.