Augsburg expands commitment to undocumented, DACA students

We Are Called | Auggies

Additional information about Augsburg College’s commitment to undocumented and DACA students will be made available in the coming weeks at augsburg.edu/undocumented.

Augsburg College, on April 7, will recommit and expand its commitment to educating students of ability regardless of citizenship and immigration status in support of United We Dream’s National Institution Coming Out Day.

“We recognize that intellectually talented students of ability come from all walks of life,” said Augsburg College President Paul Pribbenow.

“Increasingly, undocumented students are raised right here, in the United States. Augsburg – and every higher education institution – must heed the call to educate students of ability. It is through this call that our colleges and universities can secure economic prosperity not only for students, but for our state and nation.”

Since 2007, Augsburg has set the bar among colleges and universities in Minnesota in its work with undocumented students. For example, Augsburg, for years, has fully reviewed applications of undocumented and/or DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) students who graduate from high schools in the United States. These student applications are considered for admission and for all types of private financial aid offered by Augsburg. Undocumented and DACA students admitted to Augsburg College are not classified as international students and are not distinguished from domestic students. Continue reading

Max Meyer, Minnetonka Middle School, wins Spelling Bee

Winner advances to Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.

2015 Spelling Bee: Max Meyer

Max Meyer

(MINNEAPOLIS) – Max Meyer, 12, of Minnetonka Middle School East, was named champion of the 7-County Metro Area Regional Spelling Bee held March 21 at Hoversten Chapel at Augsburg College. He won in the 14th round when he correctly spelled “electrolyte” and “transenna.” He is the son of Carey and Dave Meyer of Shorewood.

Meyer will be sent by Augsburg College with a parent or guardian to the Scripps National Spelling Bee scheduled May 24-29 in Washington, D.C. Other top spellers included:

  • Second place: Mark Kivimaki, 13, of Valley View Middle School, was eliminated during round 13 for misspelling “badigeon.” Kivimaki, who was the 2014 champion, is the son of Mary and Bruce Kivimaki of Edina.
  • Third place: Elise Weier, 13, Shakopee West Junior High School, was eliminated during round 11 for misspelling “zircon.” She is the daughter of Cara Weier of Shakopee.
  • Fourth place: Josephine Spanier, 12, of Anthony Middle School, was eliminated during round 10 for misspelling “neritic.” She is the daughter of Kristine Spanier of Minneapolis.
Max Meyer will advance to the National Spelling Bee.

Max Meyer will advance to the National Spelling Bee.

A total of 47 students from 47 schools competed in the spelling bee. Spellers were from elementary, middle and junior high schools, community and magnet schools, private and home schools.

The head judge of the competition was Dennis Bluhm. He has served for 46 years as an elementary school principal and teacher, and 12 years as head judge of the State Spelling Bee. The pronouncer was David Talarico.

Augsburg College is set in a vibrant neighborhood at the heart of the Twin Cities, and offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and nine graduate degrees to more than 4,000 students of diverse backgrounds. Augsburg College educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. The Augsburg experience is supported by an engaged community that is committed to intentional diversity in its life and work. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings.

Nobel Peace Prize Forum garners range of media attention

2015 NPPFThe Nobel Peace Prize Forum garnered a range of media coverage before and after the event. Some of the coverage is documented below.

March 14

March 7

U.S. President Jimmy Carter, an honored Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, spoke at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum on March 6.

U.S. President Jimmy Carter, an honored Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, spoke at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum on March 6.

March 6

March 5

Bring Me the News: Former President Jimmy Carter to speak at Nobel Prize event in Minneapolis

March 2

JennaFebruary 27

February 25

  • MinnPost: Pamela Espeland’s Artscape round up includes briefs about the Nobel Peace Prize Forum as well as Nobel Creations at the American Swedish Institute

February 19

MPR airs Nobel Peace Prize Forum conversation on refugee crises

MPR's Tom Weber, left, talks with Daniel Wordsworth of the American Refugee Committee.

MPR’s Tom Weber, left, talks with Daniel Wordsworth of the American Refugee Committee.

Minnesota Public Radio aired a presentation from the Nobel Peace Prize Forum by Daniel Wordsworth, director of the American Refugee Committee, about the ARC’s humanitarian programs in 11 countries. After Wordsworth’s presentation, he participated in a question and answer session moderated by MPR’s Tom Weber. Listen to “American Refugee Committee director on the future of refugees” on the MPR website.

EAST program scholars talk with Minnesota Public Radio

MPRLogoMinnesota Public Radio’s Tim Post profiled Augsburg College’s East African Student to Teacher (EAST) program, which works to recruit and train teachers of East African descent in an effort to help close the K-12 achievement gap.

The program, directed by Audrey Lensmire, assistant professor of education, told Post that by “having more teachers of color in our K-12 system, their professional voice will be shared by their colleagues.”

Post spoke with two current EAST scholars, Abdiasis Hirsi and Asma Ibrahim. Hirsi, who teaches at Wellstone International High School, was born in Somalia and raised in Kenya. He shared with Post that when he was only 19, Hirsi helped start a school in Nairobi to teach English to Somali refugees. Ibrahim, who shared with Post that she was born in Pakistan to Somali refugees, said she had a difficult time as a student in connecting with her teachers in Owatonna. She hopes to become a teacher to help students who are like her become comfortable enough to learn.

EAST is funded by the Collaborative Urban Educator Program and received $390,000 for two school years including 2013-14 to 2014-15. Additional funding is now being sought from the Minnesota State Legislature. State Sen. Kari Dziedzic has introduced a bill to nearly double funding over the next two years.

Listen or read “East African teachers connect with younger versions of themselves” on the website of MPR News. Learn more about the EAST program.

Matt Beckman adviser to award-winning high-school researcher at Breck School

AmInEngSocAssistant Professor of  Biology Matt Beckman spoke with the Star Tribune about the work he is doing as an adviser to a Breck School senior doing research on 200-year-old pollen samples.

Grant Two Bulls, a member of the Oglala-Lakota tribe, won the American Indian Science and Engineering Society’s competition through his work and which is providing a look at the lives of his ancestors when they lived near Lake Calhoun.

“Here’s a high school senior doing pretty high-level research and then taking that data and speaking to national audiences about it in a really impressive way,” Beckman said to Kim McGuire, a reporter at the Star Tribune.

Read about the partnership between Beckman and Breck School in “Breck student’s science project is an award-winning mix of American Indian history and science.”

Learn about another Breck School student, Taylor McCanna, who was coached by David Murr, physics professor. McCanna took second place in one of the most prestigious international science fairs for her work with Murr.

Regional spelling bee March 21 at Augsburg College

Winner will advance to Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.

SpellingBee(MINNEAPOLIS) – Fifty middle- and junior-high school students from throughout the seven-county Metro area will compete at Augsburg College in the 2015 regional spelling bee on March 21 at Hoversten Chapel at Augsburg College.

The winner of the regional spelling bee will be sent by Augsburg College with a parent or guardian to the Scripps National Spelling Bee (http://spellingbee.com/) scheduled from May 24-29 in Washington, D.C.

Event Details

  • Schedule
    • 11 a.m. – Registration
    • 12:30 p.m. – Competition begins
    • Event ends when all but one speller is eliminated, typically within 4-6 hours from the start of competition.
  • Head Judge: Dennis Bluhm has served as the Head Judge for the State Spelling Bee for the past 12 years. He has served during the past 45 years as an elementary school principal and teacher. Currently, he teaches 6th grade in St. Paul.
  • Pronouncer: David Talarico has been an official spelling bee pronouncer since 2006. He lives in Minneapolis, and works for Shapco Printing.

Augsburg College is set in a vibrant neighborhood at the heart of the Twin Cities, and offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and nine graduate degrees to more than 4,000 students of diverse backgrounds. Augsburg College educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. The Augsburg experience is supported by an engaged community that is committed to intentional diversity in its life and work. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings.

U.S. President Jimmy Carter talks with MPR before presentation to sold-out crowd at Nobel Peace Prize Forum

U.S. President Jimmy Carter, an honored Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, spoke at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum on March 6.

U.S. President Jimmy Carter, an honored Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, spoke at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum on March 6.

U.S. President Jimmy Carter, who was an honored Laureate featured at the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize Forum, spoke with Minnesota Public Radio prior to his presentation to a sold-out crowd of 650 delegates to the Forum. Carter spoke with MPR’s Tom Crann about the lack of world leaders who are peacemakers. “We don’t have a global champion of peace like Nelson Mandela or Martin Luther King Jr. or Mahatma Gandhi now,” he told Crann. “None of the government leaders who represent the five permanent members of the UN Security Council are notable for promoting peace.” Listen to “President Jimmy Carter: There’s a lack of peacemakers among world leaders.”

Imam, Pastor share story about transition from enemies to friends

Rev. Mark Hanson, left, moderates a panel at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum with Imam Muhammad Ashafa and Pastor James Wuye.

Rev. Mark Hanson, left, moderates a panel at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum with Imam Muhammad Ashafa and Pastor James Wuye.

Minnesota Public Radio last week interviewed Imam Muhammad Ashafa and Pastor James Wuye about their journey from mortal enemies to dear friends. The two men, each who headed religious militia in Nigeria, shared their story of reconciliation and forgiveness at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum. “The same energy that we use to promote division we are using it now constructively,” Wuye said in the interview with MPR’s Tom Crann. Listen to the interview, “Enemies to Peacemakers.”

Join #peaceitforward campaign, tell world how you build peace

Participate in Feb. 24 photo shoot to tell the world how you foster peace building

JennaJoin the Nobel Peace Prize Forum #peaceitforward campaign to tell the world how you build peace.

You’ll become part of an international video and social media campaign in partnership with the internationally renowned Robert Fogarty of DearWorld.me, a portrait project that unites people through pictures, to raise awareness and grow involvement in peacemaking. In addition the video will be shown to an international audience at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum being held from March 6-8 in Minneapolis.

To become part of the campaign, simply stop by Augsburg College to have your photo taken. Be ready to answer the question of how you build peace and how you make a difference. Maybe you serve meals to the hungry, mentor children or serve on a nonprofit community board. Perhaps you work as part of a restorative justice program, are in a Rotary group that conducts projects across the globe, or help out an elderly neighbor. Peace building takes on many forms, small and large, and we want to capture what you do that makes a difference in your community, your state, our world.

A photographer will take a professional-quality, digital photo and a photo with your cell phone that you can post to social media. It’s your chance to tell the world why peace matters.

Who: Public

When: 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 24

Where: Augsburg College’s Oren Gateway Center lobby, 610 22nd Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55454

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