Harry Boyte discusses student citizenship

Huffington-PostHarry Boyte, senior fellow of the Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College, in his latest Huffington Post article spoke about a national live-streamed conversation titled, “The Changing World of Work – What Should We Ask of Higher Education?”

The conversation, which was organized by Augsburg College and drew support from the American Library Association’s Center for Civic Life, the Service Employees International Union, and other organizations, was focused on how to increase and improve citizenship among college students.

Read “Educating for the work of democracy – the Freedom Spirit then and now,” on the Huffington Post.

Augsburg College hosts youth wrestling club

Augsburg was featured on a WCCO-TV newscast in the Twin Cities market because the College is the location for the Minneapolis Wrestling Club, a group serving area youth.

Organizer Justin Benjamin said he wanted to establish a worthwhile club that less-fortunate kids could easily join without the worry of fees. Augsburg offered to the group its wrestling venue, which features motivational icons for young wrestlers, including plaques and awards.

Watch the report, “Mpls youth wrestling club drops fees to the mat,” on the WCCO news site to see Augsburg’s facilities.

Augsburg earns Carnegie Foundation’s Community Engagement Classification

Carnegie_CEC_digital_seal (1)Augsburg College has received its second Community Engagement Classification from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Institutions are recognized based on evidence of their collaboration with the larger community, which:

  • enriches scholarship, research, and creative activity;
  • enhances curriculum, teaching, and learning;
  • prepares educated, engaged citizens;
  • strengthens democratic values and civic responsibility;
  • addresses critical societal issues; and
  • contributes to the public good.

The Carnegie Foundation’s Classification for Community Engagement is an elective classification. Institutions participate voluntarily by submitting required material as part of an extensive application process. Those materials include but are not limited to a description of the nature and extent of the university’s engagement with the community — local or beyond — plus institutional commitment, its impact on students, staff, and faculty, and an assessment of initiatives geared toward community engagement.

About 8 percent of U.S. degree-granting institutions have earned the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification to date, and Augsburg was one of only eight Minnesota colleges or universities recognized in 2015. Augsburg previously received the Community Engagement Classification in 2008.

The New England Resource Center for Higher Education serves as Carnegie’s administrative partner, and additional information regarding the classification process is available on the NERCHE website.

Augsburg-connected startup highlighted by MinnPost

MinnPostMinnPost news featured students and staff from Augsburg College and other local universities who collaborated on a startup organization, the Sisterhood of the Traveling Scarf, which opened a women’s clothing and accessory store.

The store — aptly named Sisterhood Boutique — is nestled in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis and features donated fashions at affordable prices.

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Scarf received funding for their startup venture from several Twin Cities organizations including Fairview Health Services and the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota, as well as support from Augsburg.

To read the article, visit the MinnPost news site.

Recovery Campus magazine interviews StepUP’s Patrice Salmeri

Recovery-Campus-Issue-4-CoverPatrice Salmeri, director of Augsburg College’s StepUP program, was featured in Recovery Campus magazine to discuss her role as incoming president of the Association of Recovery in Higher Education.

Salmeri, who has overseen the StepUP program since 2002, began her tenure as president of ARHE in June 2014. Taking on the new role while continuing as director of StepUP has her exactly where she wants to be in life.

“This work is my calling; I have no doubt about it,” she said. “It has been confirmed over and over again. I am exactly where I need to be right now.”

Read Salmeri’s story on the Recovery Campus website.

Lars Dyrud ’97 featured by Forbes

Lars Dyrud ’97, CEO of OmniEarth–a data analytics and imaging company, was featured by Forbes magazine for a collaboration with Ball Aerospace, a similar company.

OmniEarth partnered with Ball Aerospace to create a collection of 18 imaging satellites which are scheduled to be in space by 2018. The satellites, Dyrud said, are significantly different than earlier models.

“We’re focused on small, low-cost satellites. Something that wasn’t even conceivable 5 or 10 years ago,” he said.

To read the article, visit the Forbes site.

Herb Chilstrom ’54 pens sentimental book

547a2dfec34a1.imageHerb Chilstrom ’54 was highlighted in Arizona’s Green Valley News thanks to his newest book, “My friend Jonah and other dogs I’ve loved.”

Chilstrom, who was the first Presiding Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, captured the heart of a Green Valley News editor – Dan Sheare – after he reviewed the book for the news site. The book, Sheare said, “…relates stories that provide plenty of evidence that dogs can be great teachers — if you’re paying attention.”

Read “From the editor: Good for the soul” on the Green Valley news site.

Dave Conrad: Employee trust good for business

PostBulletinDave Conrad, Augsburg College’s assistant director of the Rochester MBA program, wrote in his latest Post-Bulletin column that employees’ trust of their managers is essential for a successful business.

Conrad said employees should feel a sense of camaraderie toward their managers — camaraderie that needs to be obtained over time.

“…managers can’t demand respect and loyalty; they have to earn it,” he said. “In the long run, it’s difficult — if not impossible — to be an exceptional manager without employee trust.”

To read Conrad’s column, visit the Post-Bulletin news site.

General public ticket sale for Bill Nye starts Dec. 8

‘The Science Guy’ talks Feb. 14 on how science can save the world

Bill Nye PosterWhat

Bill Nye “The Science Guy” will share his love for science when he speaks Feb. 14 at Augsburg College in an address that is open to the general public. Nye, who will be on campus for the College’s Scholarship Weekend, will speak with academic depth and humor about planetary science, climate change, evolution, environmental awareness and more in his address “How Science Can Save the World.”

Who

Bill Nye is a mechanical engineer who wants the world to know and appreciate the passion, beauty, and joy (the P, B & J) of science. Nye’s show, “Bill Nye The Science Guy,” has garnered 18 Emmy awards. Nye won seven of those Emmy awards as host and head writer of the show. These days, Nye travels the globe exhorting audiences to change the world. He has a day job as the CEO of The Planetary Society, the world’s largest non-governmental space interest organization. Nye’s newest book, “Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation,” was released in November.

Where

Augsburg College’s Kennedy Center, located in Si Melby Gymnasium (715 23rd Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55454)

When

  • Doors open at 10 a.m., Feb. 14
  • Presentation from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 14

Ticket Information

  • Sale begins at 10 a.m., Dec. 8
  • Students: $12
  • General Public/Adults: $28
  • A $3 service charge will be applied to each ticket at the time of checkout.
  • Purchase tickets at augsburg.edu/tickets 

About Augsburg College

Augsburg College is set in a vibrant neighborhood at the heart of the Twin Cities, and offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and nine graduate degrees to nearly 4,000 students of diverse backgrounds. Augsburg College educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. The Augsburg experience is supported by an engaged community committed to intentional diversity in its life and work. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings.

Star Tribune features Augsburg professor, winner of Tekne award

Minneapolis Star TribuneRod Greder, Augsburg College business instructor and founder of Awear Technologies, was mentioned in the Twin Cities Star Tribune after Awear was named one of 12 companies to receive recognition at the 15th annual Tekne Awards.

The yearly award ceremony, held by the Minnesota High Technology Association, honors individuals and companies that have made significant advancements in technology.

Greder’s company, with help from the University of Minnesota and other partners, develops specialized eyewear for students with learning disabilities.

To read the article,visit the Star Tribune news site.

To learn more about Awear Technologies and other award recipients, visit the Tekne Awards site.