Women’s Press, Twin Cities Daily Planet publish profile on
Jacquie Berglund

TCDailyPlanetAugsburg alumna Jacquie Berglund ’87, CEO of Finnegans charitable beer company, was featured by two media outlets based out of the Twin Cities. A Minnesota Women’s Press profile on Berglund was republished by the Twin Cities Daily Planet. In the story, Berglund describes her history as the founder of Finnegans — a company that donates 100 percent of its profits to charity — and its newly launched food sharing initiative known as the “reverse food truck.” Learn more in “Turning beer into food: Jacquie Berglund’s company, FINNEGANS, does well doing good.”

MinnPost features StepUP in story about collegiate recovery

MinnPostAugsburg College’s StepUP program, a residential program for undergraduate students in recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol, was featured in the MinnPost. Program Director Patrice Salmeri was interviewed about StepUP, orientation for students, and the role of StepUP in shaping collegiate recovery programs at other institutions. Read “Sober-living communities make college possible for students in recovery.”

Sculptures by Alexandra Buffalohead ’13 called show ‘highlight’

A recent City Pages article reviewed the opening of “On Fertile Ground: Native Artists in the Upper Midwest” being held at All My Relations Gallery in Minneapolis. Augsburg College alumna Alexandra Buffalohead ’13 is among those showing work at the gallery. City Pages describes Buffalohead’s work as “one of the highlights of the show” and describes her sculptures as hanging “like ghosts in front of a turquoise wall.” Read the full review on the City Pages website.

Legendary coach Edor Nelson ’38 honored by community, media

Edor Nelson '38 was presented a special jersey in honor of his 100th birthday.

Edor Nelson ’38 was presented a special jersey in honor of his 100th birthday.

Legendary Auggie coach, athlete and instructor Edor Nelson ’38 died August 27 at the age of 100. Nelson, who led the Auggie football and baseball teams for nearly four decades, died only nine days after a centennial birthday celebration at Augsburg where hundreds of friends and Auggies turned out to honor him. Nelson’s birthday celebration and his death have garnered strong media attention. Coverage of Nelson’s birthday party and incredible life include:

Auggie Stephan Eirik Clark talks with MinnPost about debut novel

StephanClarkAssistant Professor of English Stephan Eirik Clark spoke with MinnPost about his debut novel, Sweetness #9. In the interview, Clark told reporter Amy Goetzman that his book was 13 years in the making. He addressed the surreal experience of being given a “Colbert Bump” from television’s Stephen Colbert on the Colbert Report, how truth is stranger than fiction, and provided insight into his view of the world. Clark also said that while some reviews and critics have labeled his novel “satire,” he thinks of it as an absurdist work. “It’s real and it’s absurd, and that’s pretty much how I see our world,” Clark told Goetzman. Read “Augsburg author find sweetness in light of Colbert Bump.”

Augsburg recognized among top LGBT-friendly campuses in nation

TCDailyPlanetAugsburg College was recognized by Twin Cities Daily Planet for being named among the top 50 most LGBT-friendly campuses in the nation by 2014 CampusPride. Stephanie Weiss, news and media services director, told reporter Cirien Saadah that while Augsburg is grateful for such recognition, the credit belongs to students for leading boldly as individuals and groups. Read “Minnesota schools make ‘most LGBT-friendly‘ list.”

Auggies featured in German newspaper

Augsburger AllegmeineThree Auggies were featured in a story in the Augsburger Allegmeine’s series “We are all Augsburger.” Natalya Brown, Kayla Feuchtmann, and Jens Pinther shared photos of themselves on campus, their areas of study, and comments about Augsburg College’s namesake with the German newspaper’s Nicole Prestle. See the story on the Augsburger Allegmeine website. Click on the photo in the story to go to a gallery of photos of the three students.

Rod Greder talks with Star Tribune about content marketing

http://tech.mn/news/tag/rod-greder/Instructor Rod Greder spoke with the Star Tribune’s Neal St. Anthony for a business section story about content marketing, or the practice of promoting sales through storytelling. Greder, who is an instructor in the Business-MIS program, told St. Anthony that content marketing is growing in its use and sophistication. “The basic concept is not new but evolving with technology to work better with search engines,” Greder said in the article which also was picked up by Bloomberg News. “It is being used most to generate leads and initiate conversations with prospects and then used for conversion to customer as the prospect views the company as a credible, knowledgeable source on the topic. Content often is sent to the prospect [via e-mail] and then the [customer] develops enough trust to sample the company’s product or service.” Read “Marketing trends: Selling by storytelling.”

Star Tribune reviews ‘Sweetness #9′ by Stephan Eirik Clark

ows_1408055796179Stephan Eirik Clark’s debut novel, Sweetness #9, was described as a “lively and funny debut novel” by Mark Athitakis in a Star Tribune book review. Athitakis went on to say that while the book’s premise is esoteric, Clark convincingly argues that food may be the last truly mass culture we have. Clark is an assistant professor in the English department and a member of the faculty for the Master of Fine Arts program. Read “Review: ‘Sweetness #9,’ by Stephan Eirik Clark.”

Nancy Steblay shares expertise on eyewitness identification

Professor Nancy Steblay

Prof. Nancy Steblay

Psychology Prof. Nancy Steblay spoke with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the reliability of eyewitness identification of criminal suspects. Steblay, who is a leading national expert on eyewitness identification, told the paper that the practice of showing a witness one photo at a time is more reliable than having witnesses look at an array of photos at once. Steblay said that a sequential process, “although it’s not perfect, it’s far superior – significantly superior – to the simultaneous procedure” because the witness is forced to compare the memory of the suspect to a single photo. The end result, she said, is a more absolute judgment. Read “New Pittsburgh public safety director spars with district attorney on eyewitness IDs.”