Augsburg wrestling’s record win draws media attention

In mid-March, Augsburg College won its 12th NCAA Division III wrestling championship and took home a number of awards from the National Wrestling Coaches Association.

Head coach Jim Moulsoff was named Division III National Coach of the Year and Division III Rookie Coach of the Year. Tony Valek ’12 was named Assistant Coach of the Year, and Mike Fuenffinger ’15 won his second national title and the Outstanding Wrestler honor. Eric Hensel ’16 won Most Falls in Least Time, and Donny Longendyke ’15 earned his first national title.

Media coverage of Augsburg’s NCAA Championship win includes the following:

Augsburg College recognized for Muslim student organization

Minneapolis Star TribuneAugsburg College was mentioned in the Minneapolis Star Tribune as part of an article about Muslim student associations that boast women in leadership roles.

Augsburg’s Muslim Student Association, led by Muna Mohamed ’16, aims to promote unity among Muslim students and to raise awareness within the Augsburg community about the culture, history, and language of the Muslim community.

To learn more about Augsburg’s Muslim Student Association and similar organizations at other campuses, visit the Star Tribune news site.

EAST program scholars talk with Minnesota Public Radio

MPRLogoMinnesota Public Radio’s Tim Post profiled Augsburg College’s East African Student to Teacher (EAST) program, which works to recruit and train teachers of East African descent in an effort to help close the K-12 achievement gap.

The program, directed by Audrey Lensmire, assistant professor of education, told Post that by “having more teachers of color in our K-12 system, their professional voice will be shared by their colleagues.”

Post spoke with two current EAST scholars, Abdiasis Hirsi and Asma Ibrahim. Hirsi, who teaches at Wellstone International High School, was born in Somalia and raised in Kenya. He shared with Post that when he was only 19, Hirsi helped start a school in Nairobi to teach English to Somali refugees. Ibrahim, who shared with Post that she was born in Pakistan to Somali refugees, said she had a difficult time as a student in connecting with her teachers in Owatonna. She hopes to become a teacher to help students who are like her become comfortable enough to learn.

EAST is funded by the Collaborative Urban Educator Program and received $390,000 for two school years including 2013-14 to 2014-15. Additional funding is now being sought from the Minnesota State Legislature. State Sen. Kari Dziedzic has introduced a bill to nearly double funding over the next two years.

Listen or read “East African teachers connect with younger versions of themselves” on the website of MPR News. Learn more about the EAST program.

Matt Beckman adviser to award-winning high-school researcher at Breck School

AmInEngSocAssistant Professor of  Biology Matt Beckman spoke with the Star Tribune about the work he is doing as an adviser to a Breck School senior doing research on 200-year-old pollen samples.

Grant Two Bulls, a member of the Oglala-Lakota tribe, won the American Indian Science and Engineering Society’s competition through his work and which is providing a look at the lives of his ancestors when they lived near Lake Calhoun.

“Here’s a high school senior doing pretty high-level research and then taking that data and speaking to national audiences about it in a really impressive way,” Beckman said to Kim McGuire, a reporter at the Star Tribune.

Read about the partnership between Beckman and Breck School in “Breck student’s science project is an award-winning mix of American Indian history and science.”

Learn about another Breck School student, Taylor McCanna, who was coached by David Murr, physics professor. McCanna took second place in one of the most prestigious international science fairs for her work with Murr.

Harry Boyte talks special education and civil rights

Huffington-PostIn his latest Huffington Post article, Harry Boyte, Augsburg’s Sabo Senior Fellow, discussed special education and how it has become part of a “new” civil rights movement.

In the article, Boyte says that Augsburg College is a school that has gotten it right.

“The Augsburg special education program, dedicated to changing the entire special education profession from an approach which seeks to fix “problem kids” to an empowering pedagogy called Public Achievement which develops their public skills, is an outstanding example,” Boyte wrote in the article.

Read “The march is not over yet: a different education for the 21st century,” on the Huffington Post news site.

Ibrahim Al-Hajiby ’14, President Pribbenow speak with Star Tribune

Minneapolis Star TribuneIbrahim Al-Hajiby ’14, an international student and alumnus of Augsburg College, discussed his advocacy for his home country of Yemen in a recent Star Tribune article.

In the story, Al-Hajiby discussed his “mission to upgrade the image of Yemen, which is synonymous with terrorism and political upheaval in some Western minds.” According to the article, which also quoted President Paul Pribbenow, “Al-Hajiby instead plays up the country’s ancient culture and a young generation yearning for democracy.”

Read, “Augsburg honors student who shows there’s more to Yemen than terrorism,” on the Star Tribune website, or hear Al-Hajiby speak about Yemen and his activism in a recent Public Radio International story.

Dave Conrad discusses when to let an employee go

PostBulletinDave Conrad, assistant director of the Rochester MBA program, wrote in his latest column for the Rochester Post-Bulletin about the ins and outs of firing an employee.

Conrad suggests a checklist, of sorts, to weigh the options when deciding whether or not to dismiss an employee.

“Because terminating someone is such a big decision, it helps to have an unemotional and objective way to measure the impact of the decision,” Conrad said.

To read the article, visit the Post-Bulletin news site.

Bridget Robinson-Riegler named among top psychology professors

robinsonBridget Robinson-Riegler, cognitive psychology professor at Augsburg College, was included on a list of 10 “must-take” psychology professors in the Twin Cities.

Robinson-Riegler began her teaching career at Augsburg in 1994. Students describe her as firm-yet-fair, kind, and intelligent. She said she is thankful to have been a part of the list and that she draws her inspiration from students.

“I am so grateful to the Augsburg students who inspire me and remind [me] every day how truly lucky I am,” Robinson-Riegler said.

Robinson-Riegler is skilled at making complex psychology concepts comprehensible for a general audience. She recently contributed to one of WCCO’s “Good Question” segments about memory in the human brain.

To read the full list and more about Robinson-Riegler, visit the Careers In Psychology site.

Harry Boyte discusses importance of civic agency

Huffington-PostHarry Boyte, senior fellow in the Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship, in his latest Huffington Post article talked about the importance of civic studies within schools.

In 1991, Boyte helped start Public Achievement, an “interdisciplinary action-oriented field focused on agency and citizens as co-creators,” to encourage the practice of self-organized civic action among students.

Read “Civic Agency and Executive Function: An Emerging Conversation” on the Huffington Post site.

MPR features Augsburg’s Central Health Commons

MPRLogoKathleen Clark, Augsburg College instructor and director of the Central Health Commons, spoke with MPR News about her role at the drop-in health care center.

The Health Commons, which has been open for 22 years and is free to visitors, provides medical and nutritional consultations and services as well as connections to other health care resources.

The focus of care at the Health Commons is communication and hospitality, even though–unfortunately–this approach has become less common in traditional medical settings.

Central Health Commons is funded by Augsburg College, Central Lutheran Church, and other private donations.

To read the article and learn more about the Health Commons, visit the MPR News site.

The story also was picked up by the Associated Press and since has run in: