Dave Conrad: Embrace constructive conflict

PostBulletinAugsburg College’s Dave Conrad, assistant director of the Rochester MBA program, wrote in his most recent column for the Rochester Post-Bulletin about finding the right balance between the need to deal with conflict and the instinct to avoid it. Read “Embrace constructive conflict” for details on how effective debate can spur innovation in the workplace.

MinnPost features Augsburg, other anchor institutions

MinnPostAugsburg College was one of several Twin Cities anchor institutions named in a recent MinnPost article on the roles these institutions play in strengthening Minnesota neighborhoods.

President Paul C. Pribbenow, who is chair of the Central Corridor Anchor Partnership, was quoted in the article. He described how anchor institutions view the benefits in their partnership work. “This is not just what we give to the community, it’s about our shared interests and mutual benefits,” Pribbenow said.

Fellow member of the Augsburg community Josh Ahrens, food service director for A’viands, also was quoted in the article. Read, “Anchor initiatives: Local food means business for local neighborhoods” to learn how health care, higher education, and other nonprofits are working together to improve the economic vitality of their communities.

Augsburg named a top school by Military Advanced Education

image001Military Advanced Education has selected Augsburg as a top school in its 2015 Guide to Colleges & Universities research study. A record number of schools responded to an extensive survey, and MAE staff evaluated each submission using strict criteria. Schools were evaluated by their achievement in military culture, financial aid, flexibility, on-campus support, and online support services.

The full Guide to Colleges & Universities will be published in a forthcoming issue of Military Advanced Education.

Augsburg named to list of top colleges for older students

bestcolleges1The college planning website BestColleges.com has named Augsburg to its list of the top colleges for older students. Augsburg is ranked No. 9, making it the highest listed Minnesota institution.

In order to create the rankings, BestColleges.com examined all schools with a nontraditional student body of 25 percent or more and then narrowed its list to only those schools that provide a high quality education. The site examined each school’s academics, student engagement, percentage of students above age 25, and programs geared toward nontraditional students. The site trimmed its list to 50 schools by examining institutions’ range of degree programs at the baccalaureate level or higher. View the list on the BestColleges.com website.

Dave Conrad: When you follow an incompetent leader

PostBulletinAugsburg College’s Dave Conrad, assistant director of the Rochester MBA program, wrote in his most recent column for the Rochester Post-Bulletin about the steps that allow a new leader to cope with a history of ineffective leadership in the workplace.  Read “When you follow an incompetent leader” for insight into how good leaders can communicate well and ease employees’ anxieties.

Harry Boyte writes for Huffington Post

Huffington-PostHarry Boyte, co-director of Augsburg College’s Center for Democracy Citizenship and Sabo Center, recently published the article “Civic Science — Renewing the link between science and democracy” on The Huffington Post. In the article, Boyte discusses work to strengthen the connection between science and democracy. Read the story online.

Augsburg named to list of top colleges for Native Americans

College-Cover-Image-Homepage-AISES.org-(125w)_0The American Indian Science and Engineering Society’s Winds of Change magazine has selected Augsburg as one of the Top 200 Colleges for Native American and Alaska Native students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math.

The list features colleges and universities “where American Indians are going to school in significant numbers and where the community, Native programs, and support are strong enough for these students to enjoy college and stay on to graduation,” according to Winds of Change. Likewise, this year the list includes data measuring undergraduate degrees in science, engineering, technology and mathematics-related disciplines for all students and for American Indians.

Augsburg College was one of only five Minnesota institutions to make the Top 200 list, which was published in an annual special college issue designed to inform and inspire college-bound students and their parents, teachers, and counselors.

View the Top 200 Colleges for Native Americans.

Katie Clark answers readers’ questions for Girls Life magazine

Katie Clark, nursing faculty, talked with Girls Life magazine.Augsburg College’s Katie Clark, a member of the nursing department faculty, spoke in July with Girls’ Life magazine to answer questions posed by the magazine’s readers. The publication, which has a readership of more than 2 million girls ages 10-15, is sold at many major bookstores throughout the nation. Clark, who answered a range of questions, was a featured resource in the August/September 2014 issue of the magazine.

 

 

The Line highlights Lars Christiansen and Nancy Fischer

Augsburg College faculty members Lars Christiansen and Nancy Fischer, known for their avid bicycling, recently were featured in The Line, a Twin Cities-based online journal.

In the article, Christiansen describes how he and Fischer have never been happier living “car-ownership-free” after selling their car two years ago and relying on their bicycles and, if necessary, the metro transit system.

Christiansen also revealed his tips for healthy living as well as his reasoning for choosing a car-free lifestyle, noting that the sense of community gained in such a lifestyle could easily be reason enough.

“…when you ride a bus, train or bike, you’re in public,” he said. “You encounter a greater diversity of people with whom you develop camaraderie.”

To learn more about living car-free, read “How being ‘car ownership free’ led to healthy living, community organizing and embracing transit.”