Nancy Steblay shares expertise on eyewitness identification

Professor Nancy Steblay

Prof. Nancy Steblay

Psychology Prof. Nancy Steblay spoke with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the reliability of eyewitness identification of criminal suspects. Steblay, who is a leading national expert on eyewitness identification, told the paper that the practice of showing a witness one photo at a time is more reliable than having witnesses look at an array of photos at once. Steblay said that a sequential process, “although it’s not perfect, it’s far superior – significantly superior – to the simultaneous procedure” because the witness is forced to compare the memory of the suspect to a single photo. The end result, she said, is a more absolute judgment. Read “New Pittsburgh public safety director spars with district attorney on eyewitness IDs.”

‘Colbert Bump’ creates media frenzy for Stephan Eirik Clark

Photo courtesy of Salon.com

Stephan Eirik Clark, left, is juggling lots of media since his book, Sweetness #9, garnered a “Colbert Bump” from Stephen Colbert, right. Photo courtesy of Salon.com

Augsburg Assistant Professor Stephan Eirik Clark has faced a slew of media since his debut novel, Sweetness #9, received the “Colbert Bump” on The Colbert Report. Edan Lepucki, also a debut novelist, mentioned Clark’s book during her interview by Stephen Colbert on his television show. The “Colbert Bump” is part of Colbert’s effort to raise awareness of and interest in new novels as part of Colbert’s frustration with Amazon. Since receiving the bump, Clark has garnered significant media attention for his reaction to garnering the bump and Clark also has been referenced in many other articles about the episode. In many instances, Augsburg College also has been mentioned since Clark is a faculty member for the Master of Fine Arts program. A small sampling of the coverage includes:

Stephan Eirik Clark gets ‘Colbert Bump’ on The Colbert Report

Augsburg Assistant Professor Stephan Eirik Clark’s book Sweetness #9 was mentioned on The Colbert Report as a debut novel that must be read. Stephen Colbert recently began a campaign to raise awareness of works by first-time novelists and that are published by independent booksellers. Clark’s book was singled out by author Edan Lepucki who was a guest on Colbert’s show. Clark teaches in Augsburg’s low-residency Master of Fine Arts program. Watch this segment of The Colbert Report to see Clark’s novel mentioned.

Andy Aoki answers WCCO ‘Good Question’

WCCOPolitical Science Professor Andy Aoki spoke to WCCO’s John Lauritsen about whether economic sanctions are a strategy that governments can use to change behavior by others. Aoki told the “Good Question” reporter that actions by the United States to freeze assets of some Russian defense companies and to block financing of that country’s banks and energy companies could create enough pain over the long run that Russia will change its behavior. Watch the WCCO “Good Question” interview to hear more of Aoki’s perspective on sanctions against Russia and other countries.

Dave Conrad: Listen to employees’ ideas

PostBulletinIn his latest Rochester Post-Bulletin column, Dave Conrad, assistant director of the Augsburg College MBA program in Rochester, responded to a reader’s question on how managers should respond to employees’ ideas. Conrad suggested that businesses need more skeptics involved in planning and that constructive criticism should be welcomed. To review his comments, read “Managers should listen to employees and their ideas” on the Post-Bulletin website.

Star Tribune list of books includes Stephan Clark’s Sweetness No. 9

Minneapolis Star TribuneA recent listing of upcoming books to be published appeared in the Star Tribune. Augsburg College’s Stephan Eirik Clark’s book, Sweetness No. 9, was included in the column. Clark, assistant professor for the Master of Fine Arts program and for English, was a finalist for a Minnesota Book Award for his collection of stories titled “Vladimir’s Mustache.” See the full list of upcoming books in “Chris Monroe picture book to be published in fall.”

Dave Conrad talks about shared purpose in Post-Bulletin

PostBulletinDave Conrad, assistant director of the Augsburg College MBA program in Rochester, talked in his most recent Rochester Post-Bulletin column a response to a question about fostering shared purpose and collaboration in the workplace. Conrad outlined steps toward building cohesion, including the need to identify with employees the goals, path, roles, and rewards of a project. Read “Dave Conrad: Shared purpose drives collaboration” on the Post-Bulletin website.

Adjunct faculty member speaks about legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer


MatthewsThe Rev. John Matthews, an adjunct professor of religion in the Rochester undergraduate program, spoke May 8 in Muskegon, Mich., about the life and legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a fervent resister during World War II of the Nazi movement. Matthews, past president of the International Bonhoeffer Society, delivered the 33rd Annual Charles H. Hackley Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities and that was sponsored by the Friends of the Hackley Library. Matthews is a pastor at Grace Lutheran Church in Apple Valley. Read “Teachings of Nazi Resister Dietrich Bonhoeffer subject of Hackley Distinguished Lecture.”

Former nursing faculty member talks with Pioneer Press

PioneerPressLucie Ferrell, who taught nursing at Augsburg College, spoke with the Pioneer Press’ Ruben Rosario about her visit to the National September 11 Memorial Museum. Ferrell was among the first wave of first responders from Minnesota who went to New York City to respond to the attacks on the World Trade Center towers. Ferrell n ow lives with chronic health conditions that may be due to exposure to toxins in the air at ground zero. Read “Ruben Rosario: Sept. 11 museum ensures we will never forget.”