David Lapakko wins Great American Think-Off

Screen Shot 2015-06-19 at 12.07.06 PMDavid Lapakko, associate professor of communication studies, was crowned “America’s Greatest Thinker” at the 23rd annual Great American Think-Off held in New York Mills, Minnesota, in mid-June.

This year’s debate question was, “Does Technology Free Us or Trap Us?” and Lapakko argued for the liberating qualities of technology as he took home the prize.

Learn more about the competition in the Sun Current newspaper article “Richfield professor wins title, ‘America’s Greatest Thinker.’”

 

BringMeTheNews names David Lapakko among Great Thinkers

David Lapakko, associate professor of communication studies, has been named a finalist in the Great American Think-Off, an annual competition in which hundreds of thinkers from across the United States and around the world submit essay answers to a question posed by the New York Mills Regional Cultural Center, according to BringMeTheNews. Lapakko is a veteran of the competition and this year responded to the prompt, “Does Technology Free Us or Trap Us?”

Visit the BringMeTheNews website to read the article, There’s a good chance a Minnesotan will be crowned America’s next Great Thinker.

New book by Bill Green earns Pioneer Press nod

logo-smallThe Pioneer Press featured “Degrees of Freedom,” a new book by Professor of History William “Bill” Green, shortly after its release from University of Minnesota Press. In the book, Green “draws a picture of black experience in a northern state and the nature of black discontent and action within a predominantly white society, revealing little-known historical characters among the black men and women who moved to Minnesota following passage of the 15th Amendment,” according to veteran journalist Mary Ann Grossmann.

Visit the Pioneer Press website to learn more.

Dave Conrad shares workplace advice in national publication

Screen Shot 2015-05-05 at 10.51.05 AMU.S. News & World Report recently published an article detailing common missteps among top employees, and one of the issues was identified by Augsburg’s own Dave Conrad, assistant director of the Augsburg College Master of Business Administration program at Rochester and associate professor in Rochester and Minneapolis.

Conrad noted that it can be detrimental for an employee to be overly negative, which potentially could signal that the employee isn’t right for the company.

Read “6 Career Mistakes Even Smart People Make” on the U.S. News & World Report site.

Elise Marubbio discusses on-screen portrayal of American Indians

Elise Marubbio, associate professor of American Indian Studies, shed light on the history of American Indians in film in the wake of a social media frenzy regarding a group of American Indian actors who walked off the set of an Adam Sandler movie due to its portrayal of faulty stereotypes. Marubbio’s doctoral work in Cultural Studies focused on the issues of race in film and media, with particular attention to the representation of Native Americans in American popular culture and Hollywood cinema.

In the article, “Adam Sandler movie flap sparks debate over American Indian roles in media,” Marubbio explained that tribes of the Great Plains often are portrayed living in Monument Valley – the legendary site of many John Wayne-John Ford movies, which is located on the Arizona-Colorado border, largely on the Navajo reservation.

Visit the Capital Journal website to learn more.

Colin Irvine named Carroll College’s next VP of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College

Colin Irvine, associate professor of English, will be leaving Augsburg College at the end of the 2014-15 academic year to join Carroll College in Helena, Mont., as its next vice president of academic affairs and dean of the college. Irvine’s new role was announced by KTVH-TV in a story that discussed his work at Augsburg College and areas of expertise. Visit the KTVH website to learn more.

MPR features Midnimo program’s Aar Maanta residency

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The Cedar Cultural Center and several other Minneapolis organizations hosted popular London-based Somali singer Aar Maanta in early April as part of the Midnimo series, a two-year partnership with Augsburg College to build cross-cultural awareness, knowledge, and understanding of Somali culture through music.

The Minneasota Public Radio story “Aar Maanta is the voice of a new Somali generation” discussed the ways in which Aar Maanta’s music resonates with Minnesotans and rejuvenates the Somali music scene.

Kristin Anderson discusses new St. Paul ballpark in Star Tribune

Minneapolis Star TribuneKristin Anderson — a sports architecture expert, Augsburg College archivist, and art history professor — was quoted in a Star Tribune article on the architecture of the new CHS Field set to open in the Lowertown district of downtown St. Paul this spring. CHS Field is the future home of the St. Paul Saints minor league team, and its architecture features a sleek low-slung design comprised of black concrete and steel. The article presented a number of individuals’ opinions of the design, noting that the structure is a standout amongst its adjacent buildings.

“The immediate expectation was that it had to match the things around it — ye old ballpark — and I don’t think that’s necessary … The subtlety of the exterior allows the action of the place to shine,” Anderson said.

Read, “St. Paul Saints: Not your grandfather’s ballpark” on the Star Tribune website to learn more.

Augsburg hosts Native American powwow

3_powwowAugsburg College was mentioned by the Twin Cities Daily Planet as a result of the traditional powwow held annually by the college.

The event, which was sponsored by the Augsburg American Indian Student Association and American Indian Student Services, featured traditional Native American dancers, drummers, singers, and food.

To learn more about Augsburg’s annual powwow, visit the Twin Cities Daily Planet news site.

Augsburg professor Matthew Beckman mentors gifted student

ictmn-web-logo-200x90Matthew Beckman, assistant professor of biology at Augsburg College, was mentioned in an Indian Country Today article about a student whom he advises, Grant Two Bulls.

Two Bulls is a high school senior at Breck School and has been conducting scientific research in the Lake Calhoun area – the previous location of the Mdewakanton Dakota village – to learn more about his Native American heritage. The endeavor, Beckman says, has been nothing short of remarkable.

“Here’s a high school senior doing pretty high-level research and then taking that data and speaking to national audiences about it in a really impressive way,” Beckman said in an interview.

To read more on Beckman and Two Bulls, visit the Indian Country Today news site.