Harry Boyte discusses public work on Huffington Post

Huffington-PostIn his recent article for The Huffington Post, Harry Boyte – Augsburg’s Sabo Senior Fellow — discusses the role Augsburg College and other universities can play in helping students address problems, meet challenges, and build a more democratic society using the public work approach. Read the article, Colleges as Agents of Change — The Public Work Approach, to learn more about Augsburg’s “down-to-earth quality wedding liberal arts education to career training grounded in practical experience.”

MPR offers readers a glimpse into Augsburg College life

Alex Friedrich, Minnesota Public Radio’s higher education reporter, visited Augsburg College’s campus to experience a day in the life of an Auggie. Friedrich spent Dec. 5 blogging about his experiences and found that Augsburg College has a wide variety of traditions and experiences to offer to its students, faculty, staff and alumni, and also to its neighboring communities, as well.

Read and watch his posts on the “On Campus” blog here:

  • The man leading a changing Augsburg – Meet President Paul C. Pribbenow and his passion for bow ties, commitment to Augsburg students, and vision for the College’s future

Michael Lansing talks with Prairie Public Broadcasting

Michael Lansing, Augsburg College associate professor and History Department chair, was featured in a video production by Prairie Public Broadcasting titled, “A.C. Townley and the Rise of the Nonpartisan League.”

In the video, Lansing discusses A.C. Townley, founder of the Nonpartisan League, and the inception of the organization. Prairie Public Broadcasting is a television station serving North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota that produces documentaries, web-series and other media, centered on local life and culture.

Watch the video on Prairie Public’s YouTube channel.

Dave Conrad: Employee trust good for business

PostBulletinDave Conrad, Augsburg College’s assistant director of the Rochester MBA program, wrote in his latest Post-Bulletin column that employees’ trust of their managers is essential for a successful business.

Conrad said employees should feel a sense of camaraderie toward their managers — camaraderie that needs to be obtained over time.

“…managers can’t demand respect and loyalty; they have to earn it,” he said. “In the long run, it’s difficult — if not impossible — to be an exceptional manager without employee trust.”

To read Conrad’s column, visit the Post-Bulletin news site.

Star Tribune features Augsburg professor, winner of Tekne award

Minneapolis Star TribuneRod Greder, Augsburg College business instructor and founder of Awear Technologies, was mentioned in the Twin Cities Star Tribune after Awear was named one of 12 companies to receive recognition at the 15th annual Tekne Awards.

The yearly award ceremony, held by the Minnesota High Technology Association, honors individuals and companies that have made significant advancements in technology.

Greder’s company, with help from the University of Minnesota and other partners, develops specialized eyewear for students with learning disabilities.

To read the article,visit the Star Tribune news site.

To learn more about Awear Technologies and other award recipients, visit the Tekne Awards site.

 

John Zobitz discusses weather patterns with International Business Times

ibtimes_100dpi300x75pxlAssociate Professor of Mathematics and environmental science researcher John Zobitz helped to answer the question posed by many in the wake of a recent record-setting snowfall in the Buffalo, N.Y., area — Why is it so cold and snowy in November?

The reason is global warming, according to Zobitz and other scientists studying the Earth’s climate. Changes in the overall temperature of the planet have affected the jet stream, thereby causing unusual weather. “Yes, the globe is warming in temperature, but that means some places are warm a lot more, and some places are sometimes colder,” Zobitz said. “We happen to be on the cold side of that right now, and no matter how you want to slice and dice it, that’s the reality.”

Read more about how changes in the Earth’s temperature influence weather patterns on the International Business Times website.

Dave Conrad: The most important leadership skills

PostBulletinA number of leadership skills are important, but which one is truly key? That’s hard to say, according to a new column by Dave Conrad in the Rochester Post-Bulletin. Conrad, Augsburg College’s assistant director of the Rochester MBA program, notes that leadership skills vary in relevance depending on individuals’ roles within the workforce. To learn why conceptual, relationship-building, and technical skills each play an important role, read “The most important leadership skills” on the Post-Bulletin website.

Pioneer Press deems Howling Bird ‘ready to take off’

PioneerPressHowling Bird, a student-run press at Augsburg College, is Minnesota’s newest small publisher. Howling Bird will take flight December 1 with the announcement of the winner of the press’ first National Poetry Prize, according to the Pioneer Press.

The honored poet will receive $1,000 and publication by Howling Bird in a trade paperback. That book will be guided through the publication process, from editing and design to marketing and distribution, by three students in the newly established publishing concentration in Augsburg’s low-residency Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program. To learn more about the MFA program and its students, read “Augsburg’s Howling Bird press ready to take off” on the Pioneer Press website.

Dave Conrad: Learn what stress is trying to tell you

PostBulletinStress has been called the “health epidemic of the 21st century” by the World Health Organization, and Dave Conrad offers suggestions for dealing with stress in his latest column for the Rochester Post-Bulletin. Conrad, Augsburg College’s assistant director of the Rochester MBA program, notes that finding ways to alleviate stress can be as beneficial for employers as it is for employees. Read, “Learn what stress is trying to tell you” on the Post-Bulletin website.

Phil Adamo shares origins of Halloween on KARE 11

Phil Adamo on set with Diana Pierce at KARE 11Phil Adamo, associate professor of history and director of Medieval Studies at Augsburg College, was a guest on KARE 11 on Halloween to talk about the origins of the holiday. Adamo shared with Diana Pierce and viewers how Halloween started as a Celtic festival that celebrated the final harvest and eventually was incorporated into Christian traditions to lure non-Christians into the Church. He also discussed the origins of the bonfire, jack-o-lanterns, and Halloween candy. Watch the segment “Halloween History 101” on KARE 11.