Psychology Professor Bridget Robinson-Riegler talks to Star Tribune about memory and identity

Ferris wheel at night
The Midway at the Minnesota State Fair. Photo: Tom Wallace, Star Tribune

The Star Tribune’s John Reinan talks with Augsburg Psychology Professor Bridget Robinson-Riegler about how the Great Minnesota Get-Together “not only entertains us, excites us and exhausts us — it makes us Minnesotans.”

“Our identity is formed by our memories. Traditions and rituals are very important in identifying who we are,” said Robinson-Riegler, who specializes in the study of memory. “Families are based on shared experiences, and this is one of those shared experiences we have as a state. The State Fair becomes a collective experience. It gives us a sense of belonging, of togetherness.

“This is what we do as a state. It confirms our identity. It becomes who we are.”

Read the full article at the Star Tribune site.

Bridget Robinson-Riegler named among top psychology professors

robinsonBridget Robinson-Riegler, cognitive psychology professor at Augsburg College, was included on a list of 10 “must-take” psychology professors in the Twin Cities.

Robinson-Riegler began her teaching career at Augsburg in 1994. Students describe her as firm-yet-fair, kind, and intelligent. She said she is thankful to have been a part of the list and that she draws her inspiration from students.

“I am so grateful to the Augsburg students who inspire me and remind [me] every day how truly lucky I am,” Robinson-Riegler said.

Robinson-Riegler is skilled at making complex psychology concepts comprehensible for a general audience. She recently contributed to one of WCCO’s “Good Question” segments about memory in the human brain.

To read the full list and more about Robinson-Riegler, visit the Careers In Psychology site.

Bridget Robinson-Riegler answers WCCO ‘Good Question’

Professor Bridget Robinson-Riegler spoke with WCCO-TV about how humans recall their memories for the news station’s Good Question segment. Robinson-Riegler, who teaches in the College’s psychology department, explained to television viewers that its common for individuals to have mismemories. She commented that memories are not like tape recorders in that people replay them exactly as they happened. Instead, memories are reconstructed, so when the brain encodes memories, it encodes different pieces of different events.

“When we go to recall it, we piece together different aspects of events,” Robinson-Riegler said. “It’s not just the event that happened we’re trying to remember but other events similar to it.”

Watch “Good Question: How Do Our Memories Work?” to learn more.