Environmental Studies majors are prepared to make a difference

environmental_studiesThis year, two students in Augsburg’s Environmental Studies program won prestigious scholarships: one received a Fulbright research fellowship and a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship, and another was awarded a Udall Scholarship. Both students say their studies and experiences at Augsburg have prepared them to make a difference in the world.

Katie Edelen ’11 [right] arrived at Augsburg intent on becoming a doctor and helping people in war-torn countries. Following her junior year of college she traveled to Chennai, India to shadow doctors in government hospitals and work with a doctor who brought internal medicine services to refugee camps, slums, and villages. Continue reading “Environmental Studies majors are prepared to make a difference”

Grub that's good for you and the environment

food_classIt will be a meal planned with the environment in mind.

This semester, students in SBS 100: Environmental Connections have studied how food fits into both our socio-economic and ecological systems. This Wednesday, they will put that knowledge into action as the class members will serve a meal that they helped the A’viands staff prepare. The entire Augsburg community is invited to share this “grub” with the class. The menu was chosen based on how the food was produced and transported.

Some of the ingredients were grown on campus. Almost all of the items were produced locally. Special consideration was placed on supporting suppliers that use environmentally friendly practices and pay employees a fair wage. Continue reading “Grub that's good for you and the environment”

Winona LaDuke presents Koryne Horbal Lecture

convo_ladukeThe fourth annual Koryne Horbal Lecture will feature internationally renowned activist and writer, Winona LaDuke. She will speak on Thursday, Nov. 20 at 11 a.m. in the Hoversten Chapel, Foss Center. A book signing in the Foss Atrium will follow the convocation.

Winona LaDuke works on issues of sustainable development, renewable energy, food systems, and environmental justice with Indigenous communities. She is the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, one of the largest reservation-based nonprofit organizations in the country. In this project, she also continues national and international work to protect Indigenous plants and heritage foods from patenting and genetic engineering. The author of five books, including Recovering the Sacred, All our Relations, and a novel, Last Standing Woman, she is widely recognized for her work on environmental and human rights issues. Continue reading “Winona LaDuke presents Koryne Horbal Lecture”

Vocatio chapel series continues Nov. 28

vocatioDr. Deon Stuthman will speak in Hoversten Chapel on Wednesday, Nov. 28 at 10:20 a.m. as part of the Vocatio Chapel Series on Science as Vocation.

Stuthman is a plant geneticist at the University of Minnesota with special interest areas of oat genetics and breeding; durable pest resistance and sustainable agricultural systems. He has a special interest in communicating with the agricultural and the general public about the urgency of reducing the environmental damage, such as soil erosion, generated while producing field crops. His research seeks to help answer questions surrounding world hunger and nutrition.

Following chapel, Stuthman will join interested community members for lunch in East Commons at 11:00. People interested in joining the group for lunch should contact Ross Murray at murray@augsburg.edu.

This chapel talk is supported by Exploring Our Gifts: The Lilly Grant at Augsburg.