Finance and Commerce highlights Augsburg’s Hagfors Center in private college construction update

Exterior of the front of the Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and ReligionAugsburg College’s $73 million, 135,000-square-foot Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion is the largest construction project underway at Twin Cities private colleges and universities. Finance and Commerce included details on the project’s scope, timeline, and funding in an article that outlined summer building and renovation projects on campuses across Minnesota.

Scheduled to open in January 2018, the Hagfors Center will be Augsburg’s newest and largest academic building. The facility — designed by Minneapolis-based HGA Architects — features a student-centered layout that will foster intersections among areas of study and encourage collaboration. As the Finance and Commerce article noted, the Hagfors Center was the focus of a successful $50 million fundraising campaign that exceeded its goal.

Comprehensive project milestone information is available through weekly updates on the Hagfors Center website.

 

 

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal covers Hagfors donation

Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal - logoThe Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal recently published an article covering the revelation that a previously unidentified $10 million donation toward the naming of the Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion had been given to Augsburg College by Norman and Evangeline Hagfors.

The donation originally was announced in early 2015, with the donors remaining unnamed until the recent groundbreaking ceremony. In a statement Evangeline Hagfors said, “Adding our name signals that we stand with Augsburg. We support the CSBR project and the many benefits it will provide faculty, students, and the Augsburg community.”

Read Augsburg identifies mystery donor who gave $10M cash for new center on the Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal site.

Augsburg breaks ground April 29 for new academic building

State-of-the-art Hagfors Center a living demonstration of College commitment to equity, diversity

Exterior of the front of the Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and ReligionMINNEAPOLIS — Groundbreaking for Augsburg College’s state-of-the-art, interdisciplinary Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business and Religion is Friday.

More than 350 alumni, faculty, students, donors and friends of the College are expected to celebrate the groundbreaking for the Hagfors Center, designed to foster intersections among areas of study, support active learning, and connect the College to the community.

View of the Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion from the current Science Hall“The Hagfors Center is a living demonstration of the College’s dedication to interdisciplinary student learning, urban placemaking and thoughtful stewardship. Our commitment to equity and intentional diversity – our pledge to prepare students of academic ability to solve the most complex problems of our world – will be on view Saturday when we celebrate the success of students from Minneapolis and Rochester, including a traditional undergraduate class with more than 42 percent students of color,” said Augsburg College President Paul C. Pribbenow.

“The new Hagfors Center, which will create learning at the intersections of science, business and religion, is a commitment to our Lutheran heritage and identity. It’s also a promise to explore diverse viewpoints, rich faith traditions, socioeconomic backgrounds, gender expressions, military commitments, learning styles and more.”

In the 10 years since Pribbenow has led the institution, Augsburg has more than tripled the percentage of persons of color in the full undergraduate student body – growing from 11 percent in 2006 to 33 percent in 2016.

Continue reading “Augsburg breaks ground April 29 for new academic building”

Finance and Commerce reports on Hagfors Center

Finance and CommerceBusiness newspaper Finance and Commerce recently published an article covering Augsburg College’s successful private funding campaign and future plans for building the Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion. The article states that the Center will more than double the school’s capacity for physics majors as well as provide new facilities for their biology, business, chemistry, computer science, math, psychology, and religion departments.

The article states that Augsburg hopes to begin construction in May and complete the building in time for spring semester classes in 2018. Currently, the building’s design is being developed. While preliminary drawings have been made available on the college’s website, a final design has yet to be approved by the school’s board. The building will be built on Seventh Street South between 20th and 21st avenues.

Community reactions to the proposed project have been positive, though the article indicates that issues such as traffic flow and pedestrian access have been raised as concerns. The article quotes Minneapolis City Council member Cam Gordon, whose ward includes Augsburg College, as saying, “Generally speaking, people are supportive.”

Read: Augsburg preps for $73M multi-discipline center on the Finance and Commerce site (subscription required).

Star Tribune tells story of Hagfors Center through leadership of Regent Emeritus Mike Good ’71

MikeGood-StarTribuneThe Star Tribune’s Neal St. Anthony on Sunday, September 27, wrote a profile about Augsburg College Regent Emeritus Mike Good ’71 and his exemplary leadership as chair of the College’s successful capital campaign for the Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion.

St. Anthony reported that Good retired early in 2012 to “take on for Augsburg’s Board of Regents what Good considers a challenged that transcended his athletic and business career.” Under Good’s leadership, the capital campaign met its goal by exceeding $50 million.

Read “St. Anthony: Retired CEO Mike Good was the All American behind Augsburg’s business building.”