Star Tribune profiles Augsburg history professor Phil Adamo

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The Minneapolis Star Tribune recently published an article about the life and career of Phil Adamo, professor of history at Augsburg College and 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year.

The article focuses on Adamo’s engaging approach to teaching history and his personal history with academia. As a young man, he decided to forgo a college education in favor of a career as a clown with the Ringling Bros. Circus. Eventually, the constant demands of performance wore him down. “I was exhausted by performing so much, and I started to think that I wasn’t funny,” he said. “That’s a bad thing for a clown.”

Returning from the circus, he enrolled as a medieval studies major at Ohio State University, where a senior project involving a summer in a monastery led to an award-winning dissertation and propelled him toward a career in academia.

The article also depicts Adamo as an ardent supporter of having a liberal arts education, which he says “gives the benefit of having a better life, a more interesting life, a better understanding of who you are as a human.”

Read Augsburg professor left circus to bring history to life on the Star Tribune site.

Pioneer Press notes Phillip Adamo’s Professor of the Year award

PioneerPressThe St. Paul Pioneer Press included Phillip Adamo, associate professor of history at Augsburg College, in its coverage of recent education news. Adamo was named the 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. More information about Adamo and the award is available on Augsburg’s News and Media blog.

Read: Education notes: News from schools near you on the Pioneer Press site.

 

Phillip C. Adamo named 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year

Minneapolis Mayor declares November 19 “Dr. Phillip C. Adamo Day”

Phillip C. Adamo(WASHINGTON, D.C.)— Augsburg College’s Phillip C. Adamo, associate professor of history and director of the College Honors Program, was named the 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

Adamo, who was selected from more than 300 top professors in the United States, was recognized November 19 in a proclamation by Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges who declared it “Dr. Phillip C. Adamo Day in the City of Minneapolis.”

“Phil expands the imaginative possibilities for students through the design of innovative and powerful learning experiences that foster critical thinking, advanced cognitive abilities, and habits of deep reflection,” said Karen Kaivola, Augsburg College Provost and Chief Academic Officer.

“He has answered his call to inspire, mentor, and educate students, providing serious challenges for the most advanced learners while guiding all students with compassion. Phil exemplifies and embodies Augsburg College’s mission to be a new kind of student-centered urban university, small to our students and big for the world.”

Continue reading “Phillip C. Adamo named 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year”

Phil Adamo shares origins of Halloween on KARE 11

Phil Adamo on set with Diana Pierce at KARE 11Phil Adamo, associate professor of history and director of Medieval Studies at Augsburg College, was a guest on KARE 11 on Halloween to talk about the origins of the holiday. Adamo shared with Diana Pierce and viewers how Halloween started as a Celtic festival that celebrated the final harvest and eventually was incorporated into Christian traditions to lure non-Christians into the Church. He also discussed the origins of the bonfire, jack-o-lanterns, and Halloween candy. Watch the segment “Halloween History 101” on KARE 11.

Augsburg College Media Experts: Halloween, Elections

Phil Adamo Origins of Halloween: Phil Adamo, associate professor of Medieval History

Phil Adamo, an associate professor of Medieval History at Augsburg College, is available to address by phone and/or on camera the:

  • Origins of Halloween as a pagan harvest festival
  • Historic reasons people wore Halloween costumes and had bonfires
  • Myth-busting whether Halloween was/is Satanic, a belief held by some Christian groups at various times throughout history

More about Adamo is at http://www.augsburg.edu/faculty/adamo/

Elections: Andy Aoki, professor of political science

Andy AokiAndy Aoki regularly provides commentary to members of print and broadcast media on issues related to elections. Aoki is available this election week to offer comment on stories that include perspective on minority politics including:

  • Asian-American politics
  • Inter-racial coalitions
  • Multiculturalism

Learn more about Aoki at http://www.augsburg.edu/faculty/aoki/

Interviews

To arrange interviews with Adamo or Aoki, please contact Stephanie Weiss, director of news and media services, at 612.330.1476 or by email at weisss@augsburg.edu.

About Augsburg College

Augsburg College is set in a vibrant neighborhood at the heart of the Twin Cities, and offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and nine graduate degrees to nearly 4,000 students of diverse backgrounds. Augsburg College educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. The Augsburg experience is supported by an engaged community committed to intentional diversity in its life and work. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings.

iTerm gets attention

Tayo Johnson, a student in the Integrated Term, "Fate of the Earth 101," with other Augsburg students at the State Capitol, during the 350 Day of Action.
Tayo Johnson, a student in the Integrated Term, “Fate of the Earth 101,” with other Augsburg students at the State Capitol, during the 350 Day of Action.

What happens when you combine 50 first-year students, five professors, a gigantic problem, and no traditional grades? In the case of Augsburg’s Integrated Term, you get a pretty interesting story.

Here’s a quick primer on the iTerm.

For the students in the iTerm and the five faculty members teaching it—Phil Adamo, Lars Christiansen, Robert Cowgill, Lori Brandt Hale and Colin Irvine—this is their entire load of courses for the semester. The focus of the iTerm is on the Fate of the Earth: Food, Fuel and Consumption. Continue reading “iTerm gets attention”

Getting Medieval at Augsburg

medieval_mn This summer students from around the United States and Canada came to Augsburg College to immerse themselves fully in the Middle Ages during the third annual Medieval Minnesota camp Aug. 10-16. Students learned about different aspects of medieval life through activities like fencing, Renaissance dance, troubadour singing, storytelling, and costume making.

There have been some unique and fun additions to the camp’s program this year, explains Phil Adamo, associate professor of History and director of Medieval Studies at Augsburg College. Recently acquired wax replicas of medieval seals were studied by the group. A King Arthur film festival was a big hit. Even a moonlit trip to the new labyrinth on campus, created by Augsburg students this summer, was a wonderful capstone experience for the campers. Continue reading “Getting Medieval at Augsburg”

Following the winding path

labyrinth“Then it seemed like falling into a labyrinth: we thought we were at the finish, but our way bent round and we found ourselves as it were back at the beginning, and just as far from that which we were seeking at first.” This is how Plato used the image of a labyrinth to describe the quest to develop a logical argument.

From ancient to medieval to modern times, labyrinths have captivated the human imagination. Now, thanks to professor Phil Adamo and the students in his “History of Labyrinths” summer course, Auggies and passers-by can experience the same angst, or perhaps peace and tranquility, as Plato and his students may have in wandering a path or constructing an argument. Continue reading “Following the winding path”