Professor Andy Aoki discusses international and local politics on KSTP’s Political Insider

Augsburg Professor and Political Science Chair Andrew Aoki discusses United Nations, North Korea, and the Minnesota state budget on “Political Insider.”

Augsburg University Professor and Political Science Chair Andrew Aoki joined KSTP’s Tom Hauser on the weekly news segment, Political Insider to discuss President Donald J. Trump’s September address to the United Nations. Aoki also discussed local political dynamics between the Minnesota State Legislature and Governor Mark Dayton in the interview.

See the full “Political Insider” interview.

KSTP’s Political Insider program features Andy Aoki

Andy Aoki on set at KSTPThis week, Andy Aoki, department chair of political science and Sabo fellow at Augsburg College, was a featured analyst on Political Insider, a weekly news segment broadcast on KSTP.

Aoki joined Larry Jacobs, a University of Minnesota faculty member, and provided input on a variety of local and national political stories including Minnesota’s health care affordability issue and confirmation hearings for President Elect Donald Trump’s cabinet members.

Watch: “Political Insider: Exclusive Kaler Interview, Sessions Confirming Hearing” on the KSTP site.

Andy Aoki appears on KSTP’s Political Insider program

Screen Shot 2015-02-06 at 1.39.40 PMThis week, Andy Aoki, department chair of political science and Sabo fellow at Augsburg College, appeared on Political Insider, a weekly news segment on KSTP.

Aoki joined Joe Pescek, a Hamline Univeristy faculty member, and provided input on a variety of local and national political stories including President-Elect Donald Trump’s social media commentary and a potential career move for U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison.

Watch: “Political Insider: Keith Ellison DNC Chair Interest, Vikings Suite Audit” on the KSTP site.

Andy Aoki helps answer WCCO’s “Good Question”

WCCO - logoWCCO recently sought counsel from Andy Aoki, professor and department chair of political science at Augsburg College, to answer a viewer’s question about the timing of the New Hampshire Primary and the Iowa Caucus.

“Why do Iowa and New Hampshire vote first?” was the focus of the recent Good Question segment.

Aoki provided a straightforward answer.

“Today, they’re first because they want to be,” he said before explaining the history of the events in more detail. The segment goes on to explain how the advent of television turned the previously ignored New Hampshire primary into a nation-wide media spectacle. This prompted the state to pass a law requiring that they remain the first to select a candidate.

How did Iowa end up voting earlier? “Technically, New Hampshire is the first primary and Iowa is the first caucus, so they’ve worked out a little agreement,” Aoki explained.

Read and watch: Good Question: Why Do Iowa & New Hampshire Vote First? on the WCCO site.

Andy Aoki appears on KSTP’s Political Insider program

Screen Shot 2015-02-06 at 1.39.40 PMThis month, Andy Aoki, department chair of political science and Sabo fellow at Augsburg College, appeared on Political Insider, a weekly news segment on KSTP. Aoki joined Joe Pescek, a Hamline Univeristy faculty member, and provided input on a variety of local and national political stories including Gov. Mark Dayton’s request for a special legislative session.

Watch: Political Insider: US Presidential Campaign, Infrastructure and Economy in Minn. on the KSTP site.

Dubuque a stop for college students studying and traveling Mississippi River in nation’s first-ever River Semester

Class paddled more than 250 miles since leaving St. Paul on Sept. 1

River semester canoes filled with trip gear(MINNEAPOLIS) – The Mississippi River and four, 24-foot voyageur canoes are home and classroom for a group of Augsburg College students who will be in Dubuque from Sept. 28-30 as part of the nation’s first-ever River Semester.

The students, who have paddled more than 250 miles of river since departing St. Paul on Sept. 1 as part of their nearly 2,350-mile journey to the Gulf of Mexico, will earn as many as 16 credits in biology, environmental studies, health and physical education, and political science.

“The canoes are a floating classroom where students translate into action what they learn on shore during lectures and from their reading and homework,” said Professor Joe Underhill, creator of this hands-on learning program.

“Each student also is responsible for personal research project, some in partnership with state and national agencies. Some of these projects contribute to the common good, and every project is a chance for teamwork and collaborative excellence.”

The dozen students participating in this hands-on learning program, created by Underhill, is offered in partnership with Wilderness Inquiry, a nonprofit and inclusive travel provider that specializes in experiential programming and outdoor travel for people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities.

“We know that what happens in the boats transfers to the classroom and life,” said Chad Dayton, director of programs and partner relations for Wilderness Inquiry. “Students develop increased confidence, better relationships with faculty, and throughout their college careers, they have a shared experience to refer back to that can help with problem solving.” Continue reading “Dubuque a stop for college students studying and traveling Mississippi River in nation’s first-ever River Semester”

John Shockley provides commentary for MinnPost story on newsroom decision-making

MinnPostJohn Shockley, an Augsburg College political science instructor, recently was quoted in an article from MinnPost’s media section regarding newsroom decision-making and editorial judgment.

Shockley described interactions with a Star Tribune newspaper editor pertaining to the publication’s decision not to cover an often talked-about story from the Twin Cities metro. Visit the MinnPost website to read, “Why the Strib originally passed on the ‘making out’ story.”

Andy Aoki answers WCCO ‘Good Question’

WCCOPolitical Science Professor Andy Aoki spoke to WCCO’s John Lauritsen about whether economic sanctions are a strategy that governments can use to change behavior by others. Aoki told the “Good Question” reporter that actions by the United States to freeze assets of some Russian defense companies and to block financing of that country’s banks and energy companies could create enough pain over the long run that Russia will change its behavior. Watch the WCCO “Good Question” interview to hear more of Aoki’s perspective on sanctions against Russia and other countries.

Claire Bergren named Newman Civic Fellow

bergren_newmanClaire Bergren ’12, a political science major with a concentration in public policy and global change, minor in peace and global studies, has received a Newman Civic Fellow Award. She is one of 135 students from 30 states who were recently named by Campus Compact to receive this award.

The Newman Civic Fellow Award recognizes students on college campuses who are doing civic engagement work and trying to better their community through service.

Bergren has been involved with the Bonner program for the last three years, working with organizations including Project Footsteps and the Redeemer Center for Life. Continue reading “Claire Bergren named Newman Civic Fellow”

Starting the semester on the river

river_classThe 15 students enrolled in Political Science 241: Environmental and River Politics are getting an early start to the academic year—a start that will feature eight days of travel on the Mississippi River in canoes.

Joe Underhill, a political science associate professor at Augsburg, has taught the course that examines the politics, eco-systems, and communities of the mighty river that flows just blocks from Augsburg’s Minneapolis campus. While he has taken previous classes out in canoes for a couple of days or a weekend, this is the most ambitious river voyage yet. Continue reading “Starting the semester on the river”