Adjunct faculty member speaks about legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer


MatthewsThe Rev. John Matthews, an adjunct professor of religion in the Rochester undergraduate program, spoke May 8 in Muskegon, Mich., about the life and legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a fervent resister during World War II of the Nazi movement. Matthews, past president of the International Bonhoeffer Society, delivered the 33rd Annual Charles H. Hackley Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities and that was sponsored by the Friends of the Hackley Library. Matthews is a pastor at Grace Lutheran Church in Apple Valley. Read “Teachings of Nazi Resister Dietrich Bonhoeffer subject of Hackley Distinguished Lecture.”

$10 million gift to Augsburg College will launch new academic building

Gift from 1965 Augsburg College alumnus is largest in College’s history

BOR 05_06_11.inddAugsburg College is honored to announce that it has received an unrestricted $10 million philanthropic gift from a 1965 alumnus.

The donor’s generous contribution will support a new academic building that will house a number of the College’s academic programs including biology, business, chemistry, computer science, math, physics, psychology, and religion.

“This tremendous gift will make possible our continued commitment to academic excellence, to the hands-on learning that is one of the hallmarks of the College, and to the continued best-use of our 23-acre campus,” said Augsburg College President Paul C. Pribbenow. “Augsburg is a 143-year-old anchor institution in the heart of Minneapolis’ Cedar-Riverside neighborhood. This gift puts Augsburg on the path of being a college for the 21st century, and one that continues to deliver academic excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies.” Continue reading

Short-term study abroad: a credit and an amazing experience

shortterm_abroadDuring the winter break, several students and faculty were busy learning abroad on short-term faculty-led programs through Augsburg Abroad and the Center for Global Education.

Winter faculty-led programs were:

History of Cuban Music in Cuba with Professor Bob Stacke, Music

Students experienced the fascinating culture of Cuba and its history, politics, and religion by exploring the way Cuban music has contributed to Afro-Caribbean music as a whole. Students also explored how music is used as a means of expressing cultural difference and social realities. Continue reading

A reflection from Namibia

katelyn_abroadKatelyn Danelski ’12 [right] spent the fall semester studying at the Center for Global Education center in Windhoek, Namibia. The following is her reflection on the experience, written after her return to Minnesota.

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“How was your trip,” people ask me. “I hope you had a good time,” they say.  This past semester spent studying abroad in southern Africa with 14 other university students was so much more than just a “trip” or a “good time.” It was a life-changing set of experiences. Homestays, speakers, traveling, classes, and conversations all took me and others to new places and perspectives on spiritual, geographical, and personal levels. Continue reading

For the love of learning: Austin Smith '14 at Cambridge

austinsmithImagine spending all day with intelligent, thoughtful, inquisitive people, listening to lectures and having discussions over tea, pondering the ethics of space exploration, the avenue to true knowledge, and the question of what makes humans human. Except for the tea and the space exploration, it sounds a little Aristotelian. To those who love learning, it sounds like a dream.

This is how Austin Smith ’14, a religion and computational philosophy major from White Bear Lake, Minn., spent part of his summer. Smith was accepted to the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion’s one-week course titled “Science and Religion in Dialogue in 2011.”

The course, held at St. Edmund’s College in Cambridge, covered topics at the intersection of science and religion and featured internationally renowned speakers in areas including astrophysics, theology, neurology, nuclear science, biology, and ethics. Continue reading

Faculty retirements: Lynne Lorenzen

lorenzenAs part of our continuing series on faculty retirements, Lynne Lorenzen shares her experiences and plans for the future.

My name is Lynne Lorenzen, and I retired from Augsburg College after teaching here for one year part-time and twenty-two years full time. Over these years I have taught many classes in the religion department including introductory courses in theology and Bible, plus upper division courses in religion and politics with Andy Aoki and feminism and Christianity in the Women’s Studies program. I also chaired the religion department for six years and was director of the women’s studies program for three years. Continue reading

Learning about war and peace in El Salvador

elsalvadorDuring the January “winterim” break, several Augsburg students traveled with Religion professor Bev Stratton to Central America for REL 480: Vocation and the Christian Faith: El Salvador. First-year Katelyn Danelski reflects below on the group’s experiences.

We met with several speakers and visited different places, such as churches, a university, and a rural community, in hopes of learning more about their culture, history, and people. We primarily learned about their civil war (1979-1992) and about the roles faith and identity play in the midst of social injustice, oppression, and conflict. Continue reading

Honors students consider evolution and religion

honors_playEven if you are a theatre major, there aren’t many college courses where the semester ends with a theatrical performance. One exception is The Scholar Citizen, the introductory Honors program class at Augsburg. In this course, students read and discuss a text and then create a play, or in this year’s case four plays, as part of a theatre lab attached to the class.

Larry Crockett, a professor of computer science who teaches this course, says this class serves as students’ “…initiation to life as a scholar lived in an intentional community.” He adds that in addition to introducing students to the rigor of the Honors program, the course also teaches them to see that they are not here to ‘worship what is known,’ as the late J. Bronowski once wrote, but to ‘question what is claimed,’ with a certain ‘barefoot, ragamuffiin’ irreverence.” Continue reading

An accountant or a pastor?

cody_warrenFour years ago, Cody Warren came to Augsburg with the certain sense that he was called to become a pastor. A volunteer opportunity created in Cody a desire to learn more about tax accounting, and it also opened his eyes to new possibilites for exploring his vocation. At Augsburg, Cody majored in Accounting and Religion, was involved with campus ministry, was an orientation leader, worked with academic advising, and was part of the Augsburg accounting and finance club. And in President Pribbenow’s first year, Cody got to trade places with him for a day. He says Pribbenow reversed all his decisions from that day.

What follows is Cody’s senior chapel talk on taxes, vocation, and Bonhoeffer. If you are a graduating senior and would like to share your Augsburg story with us, please email wheelerw@augsburg.edu. Continue reading