Heritage Day 2013

Vitor-Westhelle-230x300Sunday, November 10, 2013

7:00 p.m – 8:00 p.m.
East Commons (Christensen Center 2nd Floor)

Pre-presentation reception at 6:30 p.m.

Please join the Augsburg College community in celebrating the founding of the college. As Augsburg approaches its 150th Anniversary (in 2019), we continue to lift-up important parts of our heritage. This year, we welcome Dr. Vitor Westhelle, who will speak on the question, “What is the Church Called to Say about Money, Jobs, and Politics?” Dr. Westhelle is professor of Systematic Theology at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and the chair of Luther Research at Faculdades-EST, São Leopoldo, Brazil.

Augsburg’s Heritage Day event is an admission-free event, open to all.

Bonhoeffer Display

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The pictorial exhibit sharing the life and legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer is provided through the generosity of Augsburg College. Dietrich Bonhoeffer: Life/Photographs was developed for the Christensen Symposium in September 1994. That year marked the 50th anniversary of the martyrdom of Bonhoeffer. Bonhoeffer was courageous and one of the true heroes of the 20th century.

The Dietrich Bonhoeffer Display is no longer available for travel. Continue reading

Talking about faith and values

StedmanWhile Chris Stedman ’08 was studying religion at Augsburg, he avoided engaging in any conversations about the subject of his beliefs, God, or religion. So how did a student who wouldn’t talk about religion manage to graduate, go on to get a master’s degree in religion, and become a prominent and respected voice in interfaith dialogue? He stopped talking about religion and started talking about values.

Read the full article on Inside Augsburg > 

Experiencing faith and justice in El Salvador

SalvadorBeliefs matter … and students taking Vocation and the Christian Faith (Religion 480) traveled with Professor Bev Stratton to El Salvador in January, 2012. Student Katelyn Danelski reflected on what they experienced—visits to churches, universities, and rural communities—and all that they learned about faith and identity in the midst of social injustice, oppression, and conflict. MORE >

Professor Hans Wiersma retraces Martin Luther’s pilgrimage

wiersma-walkby Betsey Norgard

Scholars of the Reformation gain deep knowledge by studying the writings of Martin Luther, but for Hans Wiersma it also became experiential when he spent four days walking in the footsteps of Luther’s pilgrimage to Rome 500 years ago.

Just before fall semester classes began, Wiersma joined the project “Here I Walk,” led by Andrew and Sarah Wilson, two Lutheran ecumenical scholars, who retraced the entire 1,085-mile route walked by Luther from the monastery in Erfurt, Germany, to Rome. Wiersma walked with the Wilsons for 66 miles, from Erfurt to Coburg.

Wiersma had met Andrew Wilson at a conference, and what resulted for Wiersma was a fortunate convergence of his disciplinary interest in Reformation studies, his research focus on the early Luther and the Augustinian monks who followed him, and Wiersma’s undergraduate background and continued interest in documentary filmmaking. Continue reading