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Sessions Overview — Day 2

Tuesday, October 29

Seeking Justice in a Changing World

 

9:40 am – 10:30 am          OPENING PLENARY in Hoversten Chapel

Keynote                            Human Rights in Palestine in the Trump Era

The presentation will focus on the situation of human rights in Palestine especially in the last two years. It will shed light on the context under the Israeli occupation, the affect of the Trump administration on the situation, in addition to the situation within the Palestinian societies. Suggested practical interventions in the fields of education, advocacy, networking and empowerment will be discussed.

Presenter: Reverend Mitri Raheb                                                    

Location: Foss Center, Hoversten Chapel



10:40 am – 11:50 am        BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Panel Discussion            The Power of Story – Old Injustices, New Narratives

This panel will discuss the role of artists, poets, and filmmakers in promoting human rights and racial justice, providing examples of how storytelling can reframe narratives, inspire action, and “speak truth to power.”  Drawing on their work in public street protests, documentary filmmaking, poetry, and spoken word, the panelists will share insights from their work as “citizen artists” and engage the audience in discussion of how the arts can be brought to bear in addressing human rights issues in our communities today.

Presenters: Nadine Bloch, Maggie Lemere, Arianna Schindle, Roger Reeves          

Location: Foss Center, Hoversten Chapel


Lecture                            Human Rights of Refugees and Other Forced Migrants:  21st Century Challenges

There are now more than 70 million peoples around the world who are displaced due to conflict, persecution, and other violations of human rights, and many millions more displaced by natural disasters, often exacerbated by the impacts of climate change. At a time when governments of the world should be responding creatively and generously to this challenge, we have witnessed a global assault on the principles of refugee protection. What can be done, and what must be done? This lecture is brought to us by The Workable World Trust. 

Presenter: Eric Schwartz                                                             

Location: Anderson Music Hall, Sateren Auditorium


Panel Discussion           Equity, Climate Change, and the Human Right to Healthcare, Part I

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights asserts that “everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of [themselves] and of [their] family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services.”  Yet in the United States and many other countries, there is widely disproportionate access to healthcare. Climate change will only exacerbate this challenge and contribute to the healthcare dimensions of climate justice. Panelists will discuss the causes and potential responses to inequities in healthcare in the U.S. and Mexico, and address ways to solve these public health challenges.

Presenter: Sherrie Wallington                                                     

Respondents: Raziel Valino and Vishnu Laalitha Surapaneni   

Location: Christensen Center, East Commons


Lecture                          Human Rights and Indigenous Communities in Nicaragua and Guatemala

Since the 1990s, development and democracy in Central America have been framed in terms of neoliberal economics and the political participation of previously marginalized groups such as indigenous and Afro-descendant communities. In the case of indigenous communities, human rights discourses have been a double-edged sword. This presentation explores, on the one hand, how human rights have been evoked by governments to curtail the recognition of indigenous peoples’ collective rights; and, on the other hand, how indigenous communities use the language of human rights to advance their struggles. 

Presenter: Fernanda Soto Joya

Location: Christensen Center, Augsburg Room


Workshop                    Critical Anti-Islamophobia – Part I:

                                     Understanding White Supremacy and the Blackness of American Islam 

This two-part workshop examines the ideological roots and impact of Islamophobia on the lives of everyday people. With the current administration enacting the Muslim Ban, there has been an increased focus on Islamophobia from the Right, as well as the spike in anti-Muslim hate crimes leading up to the 2016 election and following. However, many Islamophobic policies pre-date the current administration and have deep roots in anti-Black racism, genocide, and imperialism. The morning session aims to shed light on the ways in which Islamophobia is an outgrowth of structural racism, who it harms, and the ways in which the Islamophobia imperils our democracy.

Presenter: Namira Islam                                                         

Location: Oren Gateway Center, Room 100


Lecture                     Norway’s Sustainable Ocean Approach to Combating Climate Change

The ocean holds the key to solving many of the most challenging tasks facing the world today. Norway’s ambassador to the United States, Kåre R. Aas, will speak about how the ocean is affected by climate change, but also how the ocean can provide solutions towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Ambassador Aas will share examples of how Norway’s domestic and international efforts are trying to halt global warming, including innovative approaches within the realm of green shipping, and floating windmills in the North Sea.

Presenter: Norwegian Ambassador Kåre Aas                       

Location: Hagfors Center, Room 150 B



12:00pm  – 1:40pm         LUNCH and NETWORKING


12:30 pm – 1:40 pm        BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Panel                               Student Perspectives on Human Rights (2 students) 

Slavery in the United States: Legacies and Present Realities

This presentation examines the troubling parallels between the experiences of African American women and children during slavery and the issues facing communities of color today. The attack on women and their bodies that is currently taking place in the United States coincides with the lack of ownership women had with their bodies in the 19th century. Black women were consistently beaten, raped, harassed, and forced into reproduction on plantations. Children were ripped away from their families, in ways that are similar to the current issues on the U.S.-Mexico border. There are major human rights issues going on in the United States, ones that are negatively affecting everyone, but the attack on women and children is a struggle that has been going on for centuries

Presenter: Olivia Williams

Location: Christensen Center, Augsburg Room

Pursuing Health Equity:  An Analysis of Health Start School-Based Clinics in St. Paul Public Schools

System-level healthcare barriers, such as cost and accessibility, are significant obstacles to obtaining healthcare in the U.S. The social and structural determinants of health, namely poverty, food insecurity, gender inequality, and racism, are also important in understanding how communities experience health inequities. Consequently, many individuals rely on a system of safety-net healthcare facilities, including community and school-based health centers (SBHCs), to receive adequate healthcare. This research examines how SBHCs, specifically Health Start School-Based Clinics in St. Paul Public Schools (SPPS), address healthcare inequities and what challenges they encounter that limit the quality of care they provide. The research highlights the need to recognize and take action against the structural and social forces that negatively influence health outcomes and create barriers to receiving quality healthcare.

Presenters: Amaris Holguin                                                  

Location: Christensen Center, Augsburg Room


Informational Session       2019 Peace Scholars

The Peace Scholars program is designed to deepen students’ understanding of the central issues and theories regarding conflict, war and peace. Through an application and interview process, students are selected as Peace Scholars and awarded a seven-week academic experience in Norway held at The Nansen Dialogue Network in Lillehammer and The University of Oslo International Summer School. This information session will give you a deeper understanding of the program and provide details on to the application process.

Presenters: Natalie Zavoral and Kristy Ornelas                  

Location: Christensen Center, Nelson Room



1:50 pm – 3:30 pm          BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Workshop                       Regenerative Storytelling and Filmmaking for Social Change

Regenerative Storytelling builds narratives that transform our sense of what is possible, through utilizing our creativity, cultures, and histories as resources, and by centering the joy and growth inherent in deep connection. In this workshop the dominant narratives that hinder social change in different issue areas as well as the new stories will be identified—and specific storytelling practices—that can strengthen and propel individuals and movements towards resilience, sustainability and impact. Using film and sample stories, participants will identify the sources of dominant narratives and systems of oppression on the issues they care most about and will utilize regenerative principles to develop a new story on that issue. 

Presenters: Maggie Lemere and Arianna Schindle | Respondents: Fernanda Soto Joya and Olivia Williams

Location: Christensen Center, East Commons


Lecture                        The Essential Role of Litigation in Securing Human Rights in the Climate Crisis:

                                     Lessons from Youth-Led Climate Lawsuits

This workshop will provide an overview of the legal actions supported by Our Children’s Trust, with a specific focus on the legal basis for the cases and how we have built campaigns and movements around the legal cases we support. Discussion and audience participation will be encouraged during this session with a specific focus on how to integrate litigation into other aspects of the climate crisis and other human rights campaigns. Content will be relevant for litigators, law students, activists and those interested in the intersection between litigation and social movements.

Presenter: Danny Noonan

Location: Anderson Music Hall, Sateren Auditorium


Workshop                        The Art of Protest

This hands-on training will introduce change-makers and social activists to some of the tools and tactics developed by Beautiful Trouble, including their “Card Deck for the Revolution.”  Participants will explore ways to become more effective advocates for human rights and other social justice issues using creativity, the arts, and play, in combination with strategic thinking.

Presenter:  Nadine Bloch                                                         

Location: Oren Gateway Center, Room 111


Workshop                        Critical Anti-Islamophobia – Part II: Countering Islamophobia         

The second session of this two-part workshop will explore ways to effectively and constructively respond to anti-Muslim bias as it manifests itself in the criminal justice, immigration, and national security systems; and examine the links between political discourse, media narratives, and interpersonal violence.

Presenter: Namira Islam                                                        

Location: Oren Gateway Center, Room 100


Workshop                        Changing the World for Good: Volunteering for the Advocates for Human Rights

At The Advocates for Human Rights, we believe that everyone has a role to play in the international human rights movement.  This session will explore different ways that potential volunteers can get involved in human rights work. Presenters will be joined by a panel of current volunteers who will discuss their experiences with volunteer human rights work.

Presenters: Jennifer Prestholdt and Theresa Dykoschak

Location: Christensen Center, Augsburg Room


Panel Discussion            Equity, Climate Change, and the Human Right to Healthcare, Part II

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights asserts that “everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of [themselves] and of [their] family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services.”  Yet in the United States and many other countries, there is widely disproportionate access to healthcare. Climate change will only exacerbate this challenge and contribute to the healthcare dimensions of climate justice. Panelists will discuss the causes and potential responses to inequities in healthcare in the U.S. and Mexico, and address ways to solve these public health challenges.

Presenters: Raziel Valino and Vishnu Laalitha Surapaneni | Respondent: Sherrie Wallington

Location: Science Hall, Room 123


Workshop                        New Tactics in Human Rights

This workshop will introduce participants to the online interactive “Tactical Mapping Tool” developed by the New Tactics team to help guide and empower human rights advocates. Using current case studies selected by students from several Augsburg classes, the facilitators from the New Tactics team will help workshop ideas on how to most effectively use this tool, and introduce all participants to this powerful way of mapping out power relations and formulating effective strategies for addressing human rights issues.

Presenters: Nancy Pearson and Brent Jensen

Location: Hagfors Center, Room 150 B



3:40 pm  – 5:00 pm          CLOSING PLENARY and CALL TO ACTION

Featuring Miriam Miranda, Danny Noonan, Roger Reeves, Student Activists, and Peace Scholars

Location: Foss Center, Hoversten Chapel



Download Schedule for Day 2