Augsburg director of Undergrad Admissions discusses test-optional policy for international students with U.S. News

(Sam Edwards/Getty Images)

Augsburg University recently became one of 1,000 accredited four-year colleges and universities that have adopted the test-optional admissions policy, according to the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. International applicants should still be aware that the policy doesn’t always apply to students who attended high school outside of the U.S. At Augsburg, international applicants must submit minimum scores for one standardized test in order to meet the English proficiency requirement for admission. “The only difference is related to English proficiency,” said Devon Ross, Augsburg Director of Undergraduate Admissions, in the article.

Read full report at the U.S News website.

Star Tribune Explores Diversity at Augsburg University

Star Tribune photo

The Star Tribune showcased Augsburg’s work to build an inclusive learning community as the student body has become increasingly diverse.

There is much challenging work underway, and we are grateful for the many student voices and perspectives helping shape Augsburg’s response to the very real issues of discrimination in our world.

View the article.

 

Story: Record five African-American female players start basketball game

Photo by Dr. Mitchell Palmer McDonald
Photo by Dr. Mitchell Palmer McDonald

The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder highlighted Augsburg University students Arianna Jones, Camille McCoy, Tamara McLenore, Camryn Speese, and Kaezha Wubben, who at their Nov. 19 game against University of Wisconsin-Superior made history after becoming the first five African-American starters at a college basketball game in Minnesota, the story said. The writer described the twelve women of color on the team of 19 as the “diverse dozen.”

“In the MIAC there’s not many of us out there playing. A lot of them are sitting on the bench.” said starter Speese, in the article. “I’ve been here since the beginning…making it a point of getting people of color at our school, which is the most diverse school in the MIAC.”

 

See the full story at MSR’s website.

History Professor Bill Green talks with Prairie Public about his new book

Bill Gree's book coverAugsburg History Professor Bill Green was interviewed by Prairie Public about his new book “The Children of Lincoln: White Paternalism and the Limits of Black Opportunity in Minnesota, 1860-1876.”

Green has published articles, op-ed pieces, and book chapters on history, law, and education, and he has previously published books on race and civil rights in Minnesota history. He also has served as a past president of the Minneapolis Public Schools.

Listen to his interview here.

 

MPR News highlights artwork at the Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion

Art at Hagfors CenterAugsburg University President Paul Pribbenow spoke with Marianne Combs of MPR News about the artwork in the Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion.

Forecast Public Art connected Augsburg with a network of diverse artists, then helped create a selection process that would knit together the different disciplines taught at Augsburg.

“That was important to us because, at this point, Augsburg’s undergraduate population is almost 50 percent students of color, and so we want to reflect the communities they come from,” Pribbenow said.

During the interview with Combs, Pribbenow also pointed to the art across the glass windows, depicting Martin Luther’s handwritten version of ‘A Mighty Fortress is Our God.’

See full article and a link to the audio at the MPR News website.

Learn about the artists.

Fox 9 and WCCO highlight Augsburg students’ day of service at homeless encampment

Augsburg University students serving lunch to homeless families.
Augsburg University students serve lunch to homeless families.

Augsburg University students spent November 17 handing out jackets, blankets, children’s toys, and hot lunch to families in need at a homeless encampment near Augsburg. “It’s basically in our backyard for our school and I think that helping the community is a really big thing for me,” student Tyler Johnson told a reporter. This day of service was initiated by Augsburg student Inam Al-Hammouri, then other students quickly joined, including many members of the men’s soccer team.

“Cooking a hot lunch and serving it to hungry families out in the cold is not something most college kids would do on a Saturday, but these youth at Augsburg University are not just your average students,” said Fox 9 reporter Christina Palladino. “The students believe it is their responsibility to take action and empower their generation to build bridges to those less fortunate.” The students said they plan to organize more days of service, especially now that temperatures are dropping.

 

See full report at the Fox 9 website.

WCCO also covered the story. See full report at the WCCO website.

 

Robert Harper ’16 speaks with Kare 11 about Alan Page’s impact

Alan Page and Robert Harper.
Alan Page and Robert Harper.

Former Minnesota Supreme Court associate justice and Vikings player Alan Page was one of seven to receive a Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civilian honor. Page’s charitable work through the Page Education Foundation has helped many students of color like Robert Harper ’16 succeed in their careers. Harper spoke with Kare 11 about how the work of Alan Page impacted his life.

“He has made me want to stay true to my passion and stay grounded in social justice work. When I came out of college I was applying to less meaningful jobs. I am a second-year graduate student at Humphrey School of Public Affairs studying public policy. That is a decision I did make with Alan,” Harper said. “He always says, ‘Make sure you hold the door open for the person behind you. Make sure you send the elevator back down.’ ”

 

See full report at Kare 11’s website.

 

Star Tribune: Composition Assistant Professor Reinaldo Moya Narrates Migrant Journey

Reinaldo Moya’s “The Way North” tells the story of a Central American migrant making a journey to the United States through Mexico, leaving everything behind. Moya is a Composition Assistant Professor at Augsburg University and was recently featured in a Star Tribune article about “The Way North,” the main work on Minneapolis pianist Matthew McCright’s new album.

“I got a grant from the State Arts Board. Reinaldo and I had been talking about what we might do for the project.” McCright said. “We came up with the idea of immigration — a very rough idea in the beginning, of a migrant journey to the United States.”

Read the complete Star Tribune story.

 

Associate History Professor Michael Lansing featured in two TV documentaries

 Michael Lansing
Michael Lansing on “Flour Power”.

Augsburg Department of History Chair Michael Lansing was interviewed for Minnesota Experience’s first-ever episode of “Flour Power,” a new weekly history series from TPT – Twin Cities PBS.

The episode, which premiered September 17, explored the impact that Minnesota’s milling history had on the carbohydrates we consume every day worldwide.

Stream the full episode at the TPT – Twin Cities PBS website.

Earlier in September, Lansing was featured in “The Rise and Fall of the Nonpartisan League,” a documentary series from Prairie Public Television (North Dakota). In 2015, Lansing published his book Insurgent Democracy: The Nonpartisan League in North American Politics, then served as an advisor for the series.

Watch part 1 at Prairie Public’s YouTube channel.

WCCO-TV features Professor of Sociology Diane Pike’s “tech-free” classroom

Diane PikeTechnology has become a powerful tool for many educators. Many agree it makes learning more fun and engaging, while other educators such as Augsburg University Professor of Sociology and Department Chair Diane Pike opt for a “tech free” classroom. Pike has restricted technology use in her classroom for 10 years now.

My goal is to have you not look at your phone for 70 minutes,” Pike told WCCO-TV. “The research is really clear that being on your phone in class is distracting.” Since implementing her tech-free zone, Pike has not had significant issues. She says her small class sizes, around 25 students, make it easier to manage.