Augsburg wrestling’s record win draws media attention

In mid-March, Augsburg College won its 12th NCAA Division III wrestling championship and took home a number of awards from the National Wrestling Coaches Association.

Head coach Jim Moulsoff was named Division III National Coach of the Year and Division III Rookie Coach of the Year. Tony Valek ’12 was named Assistant Coach of the Year, and Mike Fuenffinger ’15 won his second national title and the Outstanding Wrestler honor. Eric Hensel ’16 won Most Falls in Least Time, and Donny Longendyke ’15 earned his first national title.

Media coverage of Augsburg’s NCAA Championship win includes the following:

Augsburg College recognized for Muslim student organization

Minneapolis Star TribuneAugsburg College was mentioned in the Minneapolis Star Tribune as part of an article about Muslim student associations that boast women in leadership roles.

Augsburg’s Muslim Student Association, led by Muna Mohamed ’16, aims to promote unity among Muslim students and to raise awareness within the Augsburg community about the culture, history, and language of the Muslim community.

To learn more about Augsburg’s Muslim Student Association and similar organizations at other campuses, visit the Star Tribune news site.

Whitney Restemayer ’10 wins one for the record books

logo-2Whitney Restemayer ’10 was featured in the Bemidji Pioneer – a northern-Minnesota newspaper – due to her achievement as the first woman to coach a state hockey champion team in Minnesota.

As head coach, Restemayer led the Thief River Falls Prowlers to the state High School Girls Hockey Tournament Class A Championship and to defeat Blake high school 3-1. The accomplishment, Restemayer affirms, will be the first of many to come.

“I know I’m the first to win, but I enjoy knowing that I won’t be the last,” Restemayer said in an interview.

Restemayer holds a bachelor’s degree in health education from Augsburg College. To learn more about Restemayer and her team, visit the Bemidji Pioneer news site.

Curt Rice ’84 named president of prestigious Norwegian university

31d299bCurt Rice ’84 was appointed the new rector of the Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, the largest institution of its kind in Norway.

“I’ll work to assure that our institution makes its mark both nationally and internationally. And together we will achieve our goal of becoming a university,” Rice said in an interview.

Rice, who holds a bachelor’s degree from Augsburg and a PhD in general linguistics from the University of Texas, currently leads the Committee on Gender Balance and Diversity in Research and is the Board Head of Current Research Information System in Norway.

To read the article, visit the Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences’ site.

Kuoth Wiel ’14 continues “The Good Lie” benevolence

ANCLogoKuoth Wiel ’14 appeared in an article by aNewsCafe – a California-based online news magazine – about a screening of the film “The Good Lie” sponsored by Genocide No More-Save Darfur, an organization aimed at bringing awareness of genocide in Sudan and aiding Sudanese refugees.

Wiel, who was a star in the film and continues her own humanitarian efforts, will make an appearance at the screening and partake in a question and answer session after the viewing.

To read about Wiel and learn more about Genocide No More-Save Darfur, visit the aNewsCafe news site.

Augsburg grad joins distinguished medical practice

logo-3Bruce Cunningham ’77 was featured by the Pine and Lakes Echo Journal after joining the Cuyuna Regional Medical Center in Crosby, Minn., as a family physician.

Cunningham, who is a longtime Fellow of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians, holds a Bachelor of Arts degree form Augsburg College and earned his Doctor of Osteopathy at the College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery in Iowa.

To read the article, visit the Pine and Lakes Echo Journal site.

Max Meyer, Minnetonka Middle School, wins Spelling Bee

Winner advances to Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.

2015 Spelling Bee: Max Meyer

Max Meyer

(MINNEAPOLIS) – Max Meyer, 12, of Minnetonka Middle School East, was named champion of the 7-County Metro Area Regional Spelling Bee held March 21 at Hoversten Chapel at Augsburg College. He won in the 14th round when he correctly spelled “electrolyte” and “transenna.” He is the son of Carey and Dave Meyer of Shorewood.

Meyer will be sent by Augsburg College with a parent or guardian to the Scripps National Spelling Bee scheduled May 24-29 in Washington, D.C. Other top spellers included:

  • Second place: Mark Kivimaki, 13, of Valley View Middle School, was eliminated during round 13 for misspelling “badigeon.” Kivimaki, who was the 2014 champion, is the son of Mary and Bruce Kivimaki of Edina.
  • Third place: Elise Weier, 13, Shakopee West Junior High School, was eliminated during round 11 for misspelling “zircon.” She is the daughter of Cara Weier of Shakopee.
  • Fourth place: Josephine Spanier, 12, of Anthony Middle School, was eliminated during round 10 for misspelling “neritic.” She is the daughter of Kristine Spanier of Minneapolis.
Max Meyer will advance to the National Spelling Bee.

Max Meyer will advance to the National Spelling Bee.

A total of 47 students from 47 schools competed in the spelling bee. Spellers were from elementary, middle and junior high schools, community and magnet schools, private and home schools.

The head judge of the competition was Dennis Bluhm. He has served for 46 years as an elementary school principal and teacher, and 12 years as head judge of the State Spelling Bee. The pronouncer was David Talarico.

Augsburg College is set in a vibrant neighborhood at the heart of the Twin Cities, and offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and nine graduate degrees to more than 4,000 students of diverse backgrounds. Augsburg College educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. The Augsburg experience is supported by an engaged community that is committed to intentional diversity in its life and work. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings.

Nobel Peace Prize Forum garners range of media attention

2015 NPPFThe Nobel Peace Prize Forum garnered a range of media coverage before and after the event. Some of the coverage is documented below.

March 14

March 7

U.S. President Jimmy Carter, an honored Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, spoke at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum on March 6.

U.S. President Jimmy Carter, an honored Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, spoke at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum on March 6.

March 6

March 5

Bring Me the News: Former President Jimmy Carter to speak at Nobel Prize event in Minneapolis

March 2

JennaFebruary 27

February 25

  • MinnPost: Pamela Espeland’s Artscape round up includes briefs about the Nobel Peace Prize Forum as well as Nobel Creations at the American Swedish Institute

February 19

MPR airs Nobel Peace Prize Forum conversation on refugee crises

MPR's Tom Weber, left, talks with Daniel Wordsworth of the American Refugee Committee.

MPR’s Tom Weber, left, talks with Daniel Wordsworth of the American Refugee Committee.

Minnesota Public Radio aired a presentation from the Nobel Peace Prize Forum by Daniel Wordsworth, director of the American Refugee Committee, about the ARC’s humanitarian programs in 11 countries. After Wordsworth’s presentation, he participated in a question and answer session moderated by MPR’s Tom Weber. Listen to “American Refugee Committee director on the future of refugees” on the MPR website.

EAST program scholars talk with Minnesota Public Radio

MPRLogoMinnesota Public Radio’s Tim Post profiled Augsburg College’s East African Student to Teacher (EAST) program, which works to recruit and train teachers of East African descent in an effort to help close the K-12 achievement gap.

The program, directed by Audrey Lensmire, assistant professor of education, told Post that by “having more teachers of color in our K-12 system, their professional voice will be shared by their colleagues.”

Post spoke with two current EAST scholars, Abdiasis Hirsi and Asma Ibrahim. Hirsi, who teaches at Wellstone International High School, was born in Somalia and raised in Kenya. He shared with Post that when he was only 19, Hirsi helped start a school in Nairobi to teach English to Somali refugees. Ibrahim, who shared with Post that she was born in Pakistan to Somali refugees, said she had a difficult time as a student in connecting with her teachers in Owatonna. She hopes to become a teacher to help students who are like her become comfortable enough to learn.

EAST is funded by the Collaborative Urban Educator Program and received $390,000 for two school years including 2013-14 to 2014-15. Additional funding is now being sought from the Minnesota State Legislature. State Sen. Kari Dziedzic has introduced a bill to nearly double funding over the next two years.

Listen or read “East African teachers connect with younger versions of themselves” on the website of MPR News. Learn more about the EAST program.