The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead recommends Michael Lansing’s book

TheForumOfFargoMoorheadTitleThe Forum of Fargo-Moorhead recently recommended “Insurgent Democracy: The Nonpartisan League in North American Politics” by Michael Lansing, associate professor of history at Augsburg College, as a holiday gift with regional ties.

The book details the history of the Nonpartisan League, a political movement active in North Dakota, neighboring states, and some Canadian provinces in the early 1900s.

Read: Consider these new books with regional ties for Christmas gift-giving on the Forum site.


Michael Lansing interviewed by Prairie Public Broadcasting

Prairie Public Television logoMichael Lansing, associate professor of history at Augsburg College, recently was interviewed on Prairie Pulse, a program on Prairie Public Television. Lansing is the author of “Insurgent Democracy: The Nonpartisan League in North American Politics,” which examines both the history of the Nonpartisan League and its lasting effects on politics and community organizing. In the 25-minute interview, Lansing speaks about the genesis of the book, his research process, women’s involvement in the League, and many other topics.

Watch: Prairie Pulse 1308: Michael Lansing on Prairie Public Broadcasting’s YouTube channel.

Pioneer Press notes Phillip Adamo’s Professor of the Year award

PioneerPressThe St. Paul Pioneer Press included Phillip Adamo, associate professor of history at Augsburg College, in its coverage of recent education news. Adamo was named the 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. More information about Adamo and the award is available on Augsburg’s News and Media blog.

Read: Education notes: News from schools near you on the Pioneer Press site.


KSTP reports on $400,000 grant for Augsburg Ice Arena

Screen Shot 2015-02-06 at 1.39.40 PMKSTP recently reported that the Minnesota Amateur Sports Commission awarded more than $2 million in grants to area communities to build new ice arenas or improve existing arenas. Augsburg College was awarded a $400,000 grant for Augsburg Ice Arena. According an announcement on the MASC website, the grant will be used to eliminate the use of R-22, a greenhouse gas with a high ozone depletion potential, from the arena’s cooling system.

Read: Program Gives More Than $2M in Grants to Improve Minn. Ice Arenas on the KSTP site.

Star Tribune publishes photos of 15th annual Sports Extravaganza

Minneapolis Star TribuneThe Minneapolis Star Tribune metro section recently published a number of photos from the 15th annual Sports Extravaganza at Augsburg College. The event, which had record attendance this year, connects children from area schools with Auggie physical education and exercise science majors for a day of learning and fun.

Read: Kids fly high without leaving the ground at Augsburg’s Sports Extravaganza on the Star Tribune site.

Phillip C. Adamo named 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year

Minneapolis Mayor declares November 19 “Dr. Phillip C. Adamo Day”

Phillip C. Adamo(WASHINGTON, D.C.)— Augsburg College’s Phillip C. Adamo, associate professor of history and director of the College Honors Program, was named the 2015 Minnesota Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

Adamo, who was selected from more than 300 top professors in the United States, was recognized November 19 in a proclamation by Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges who declared it “Dr. Phillip C. Adamo Day in the City of Minneapolis.”

“Phil expands the imaginative possibilities for students through the design of innovative and powerful learning experiences that foster critical thinking, advanced cognitive abilities, and habits of deep reflection,” said Karen Kaivola, Augsburg College Provost and Chief Academic Officer.

“He has answered his call to inspire, mentor, and educate students, providing serious challenges for the most advanced learners while guiding all students with compassion. Phil exemplifies and embodies Augsburg College’s mission to be a new kind of student-centered urban university, small to our students and big for the world.”

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ADVISORY: 250 children with disabilities play
November 18 at Augsburg Sports Extravaganza

15th annual event welcomes students from more than 25 Minnesota schools

Sports Extravaganza(MINNEAPOLIS)— Augsburg College physical education and exercise science students will use knowledge gained in the classroom to deliver smiles to more than 250 grade-school and middle-school children who will be at the 15th Annual Sports Extravaganza, a one-day event through which children with physical, cognitive and learning disabilities play on campus.

The success of Sports Extravaganza, slated for November 18, hinges upon the participation of Augsburg students. Together, students and faculty members create activity stations in the Augsburg Athletics dome and then assist children with each activity.

“Augsburg students take what they’ve learned in the classroom and then go out and do this event,” said Carol Enke, Sports Extravaganza director and Augsburg College HPE instructor. “The young students come to campus, and they help [Augsburg] students grow.”

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Audrey Lensmire and Salah Ali contribute to MinnPost article on Somali-Americans choosing careers in education

MinnPostAudrey Lensmire, director of Augsburg College’s East African Student to Teacher (EAST) program, and program participant Salah Ali ’17 were interviewed by MinnPost for a report on Minnesota’s growing number of Somali-Americans working toward careers in education. The article notes that the number of Somalis resettling in the state has more than tripled in recent years, which has caused an influx of Somali students and created a need for teachers, counselors, and socials workers with a deep understanding of Somali culture.

The EAST program is funded by the state’s Collaborative Urban Educator program and seeks to graduate and license K-12 teachers of East African origin. In the article, Lensmire is quoted as saying, “Typically, becoming a professional teacher has been available only to people who have money and the means to get the license.” The EAST program offers financial assistance by providing students with full tuition scholarships as they seek licensure.

Augsburg’s program is one of several made possible by the CUE program. In the article, Ali notes that he knows many Somali students in similar programs at Hamline University and the University of Minnesota. “A lot of us are in the education field right now. Many are doing social studies and ESL programs and counseling licenses,” he said.

Read: More young Somali-Americans are choosing careers in education on the MinnPost site.

Melissa Hensley notes in Star Tribune how Habitat for Humanity homes shape lives

Minneapolis Star TribuneMelissa Hensley, assistant professor of social work at Augsburg College, was quoted in a Star Tribune article about the substantial benefits that Habitat for Humanity homes provide to families who move into them. The article reports on the exceptionally positive findings in a newly released study by Wilder Research of more than 400 families. The improvements in the families’ lives include higher income, less reliance on government social programs, an increased sense of security, and better childhood performance in school.

In the article, Hensley states that the Habitat model, in which participants help construct their new homes, provides a sense of pride and cooperation that has ripple effects throughout the families’ lives. “Most individuals want to be engaged in a constructive activity,” she said. “This is something people feel they’re a part of and can be proud of.” She goes on to note that by “Enabling them to move into a place where they have stability and safety, they can blossom.”

Read: Habitat for Humanity dramatically improves families’ lives, study finds on the Star Tribune site.