This section of the News and Media Services department site tracks stories in print and broadcast media that feature Auggie faculty, students, and staff. The area also is home to material developed for University-related programs, events, and more.

Twin Cities Business “Best of Business” survey recognizes Augsburg’s MBA program

Twin Cities Business Best of Business Reader's ChoiceAugsburg University’s MBA program was named one of the top MBA programs by Twin Cities Business readers. The magazine’s annual subscriber survey recognizes Minnesota’s “Best of Business.”

Here are some fast facts about the program for prospective students.

  • Earn your MBA in 26 months with a cohort model.
  • Study abroad in Europe or Latin America.
  • Collaborate with world-famous Mayo Clinic and Fortune 500 companies through experiential learning.
  • Get an $8,000 scholarship toward your degree.
  • New: Business Analytics class! Learn to utilize data to make decisions regarding product design, marketing, organizational structure, and strategic planning

View article.

Learn more about the MBA program.

Auggie Pass Provides Augsburg Undergraduate Students Unlimited Rides on Buses and Light Rail

Augsburg’s student government approved paying for the pass by student fee so no undergraduates pays out of pocket to commute to campus, internships, jobs 

(Minneapolis) — Augsburg University now offers the Auggie Pass, a universal transit pass that gives undergraduate students unlimited rides on buses and light rail in a first of its kind partnership between Metro Transit and a Twin Cities college.

Skye Ryge was an Augsburg student government environmental officer last year when she advocated for student government to approve a $5 green fee increase to $20 per semester to pay for the Auggie Pass. She believes it will help reduce students’ financial strain and improve their chances of accepting jobs and internships involving a commute.

“As someone who uses the bus everyday, it’s great not to have that financial burden,” said Ryge ‘20, who will be a fourth-year student this fall and used to pay more than $100 monthly to ride the bus. “It’s really economically advantageous to students who pay for school like me to not have to choose between textbooks and bus fare.”

“Efficiently connecting people to schools, work and other destinations is at the heart of what a quality system does,” said Metro Transit General Manager Wes Kooistra. “We are excited about this partnership, connecting Augsburg University students to our system and our region, and hope this develops into a model that can be duplicated with other schools.”

The Auggie Pass is valid throughout the school year and is paid for by the student Green Fee and University operating funds. All undergraduate day students who pay the semester Green Fee are eligible. Students can now pick up their Auggie Pass in the Lindell Library at the circulation desk on the ground level. Visit Augsburg transportation webpage for more details.

The push for the Auggie Pass was an effort to support Augsburg’s Transportation Plan goals:

  • Enhance Augsburg’s commitment to the city, its urban location, and environmental stewardship;
  • Maximize the use of other transportation options, including light rail, bus, biking, and ride-sharing;
  • Ensure students access classes, campus services, and educational opportunities;
  • Support employees at the Minneapolis campus in getting to work.

View the announcement at Metro Transit’s site.

For details, contact: Gita Sitaramiah, Director of PR and Internal Communications. sitarami@augsburg.edu or 612-330-1476.

About Augsburg. Augsburg University offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and 10 graduate degrees to 3,400 students of diverse backgrounds at its campus in the vibrant center of the Twin Cities and nearby Rochester, Minnesota, location. Augsburg educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings. Learn more at Augsburg.edu.

Media Advisory: Augsburg University’s Largest, Most Diverse First-Year Class Serves Community on First Day of School

(Minneapolis) — Gardening. Moving. Painting. River and neighborhood cleanup. Augsburg University’s record first-year class of more than 600 students will be working in the community for their first day of college on September 3.

During Augsburg’s annual City Engagement Day, first-year students traditionally work in the community to launch their Augsburg education. The Class of 2023 is the largest ever as Augsburg celebrates its 150-year anniversary, with more than 650 students expected.. Augsburg is one of the most diverse private colleges in the Midwest — and this first-year class is the third in a row in which students of color are expected to make up the majority. Official numbers will be finalized mid-September.

This year, the first day of school will include (times approximate):

  • City Engagement Day lunch outdoors in the Augsburg “Quad.”  More than 650 students in Augsburg T-shirts geared up to volunteer, along with faculty and Augsburg President Paul Pribbenow – 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Working in a Cedar-Riverside community garden at Augsburg on 20th Avenue South: 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
  • River cleanup with the National Park Service along the Mississippi River near 34th Street in Minneapolis. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
  • Cedar-Riverside cleanup. Meet at Wienery restaurant, 414 Cedar Ave., Minneapolis, at 1 p.m. 1 to 4 p.m.

Media are invited to photograph/film students at work.

For more information, contact: Gita Sitaramiah, director of public relations and internal communications. 612-330-1476. 651-353-0061-cell.

About Augsburg. Augsburg University offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and 10 graduate degrees to 3,400 students of diverse backgrounds at its campus in the vibrant center of the Twin Cities and nearby Rochester, Minnesota, location. Augsburg educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings. Learn more at Augsburg.edu.

Congratulations to Auggies named to the Summer Semester Dean’s List

Augsburg University Seal

More than 100 Augsburg University undergraduate students were named to the 2019 Summer Semester Dean’s List. The Augsburg University Dean’s List recognizes those full-time students who have achieved a grade point average of 3.50 or higher and those part-time students who have achieved a grade point average of 3.75 or higher in a given term.

View the 2019 Summer Semester Dean’s List.

Students who wish to notify their hometown newspapers of their achievement can do so at their discretion using a news announcement template.

Media Advisory: River Semester students to canoe for 100 days with German scholars, artists

(MINNEAPOLIS) — Augsburg University’s third River Semester launches this week as part of a prestigious German initiative to explore climate change and the Mississippi River.

Mississippi. An Anthropocene River is a German research project involving many communities and initiatives along the river. Joining Augsburg students will be German travelers, including: Max Planck Institute and Goethe Institute scholars; journalists; authors, and artists.

This year’s River Semester voyagers will depart from Lake Itasca on August 30 and, for 100 days, paddle portions of the Mississippi River ending in New Orleans. The students and German guests will stop at Field Station 1 in the Twin Cities for projects on September 20 and 21.

River Semester students will learn about history, politics, the environment and more as they canoe the Mississippi while earning 16-19 credits. This is Augsburg’s third River Semester. The first two were in 2015 and 2017. View the full River Semester itinerary. For more details about River Semester, visit the River Semester site.

About Augsburg. Augsburg University offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and 10 graduate degrees to 3,400 students of diverse backgrounds at its campus in the vibrant center of the Twin Cities and nearby Rochester, Minnesota, location. Augsburg educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings. Learn more at Augsburg.edu.

Media Contact: Gita Sitaramiah, Director of Public Relations and Internal Communications, sitarami@augsburg.edu or 612-330-1476.

Assistant Professor of Psychology Ben Denkinger on why time speeds up as we age

Ben Denkinger speaks with WCCO’s Heather Brown.

Assistant Professor of Psychology Ben Denkinger spoke with WCCO’s Heather Brown about why time seems to speed up as we age.

“First, there’s the theory of ratios – that one year to a four-year-old is a much larger percentage of their life compared to one year in the life of a 40-year-old”, Denkinger explained. “It really boils down to us being a lot busier with a lot more routine tasks as we get older. The more you’re paying attention to other stuff, not paying attention to the passage of time, time slips away from you.”

Can we slow time down? According to Denkinger, you can. “Unfortunately, the way to slow time down is awful. It’s by making yourself as bored as possible,” he said.

Denkinger also runs the Aging Lab at Augsburg University.

Watch full report here.

 

AUGSBURG FACULTY TEAM CHOSEN FOR COMPETITIVE ACTIVE LEARNING IN SCIENCE SEMINAR

Jennifer Bankers-Fulbright

(Minneapolis) – An Augsburg University faculty team was selected as one of 10 from a competitive, national pool of applicants to participate in a new program designed to prepare faculty members to adopt active learning methods proven to be successful in teaching science.

Associate Professor of Biology Jennifer Bankers-Fulbright  was the lead applicant and, along with Biology Lecturer Teresa Krause and Physics Department Chair Benjamin Stottrup, learned to implement new methods based on the research findings of Stanford University professor of physics and Nobel laureate Carl E. Wieman. These methods are designed to improve teaching effectiveness and student learning in biology, chemistry, and physics courses.

The summer 2019 seminar was offered by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) and supported by a $300,000 grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation.

“The ability to think like a scientist is critical for all students, not just those who will major in STEM or plan to pursue an advanced degree,” said Richard Ekman, the CIC president. “Systematic change is needed to create the science-literate population needed to understand research-based science policy, which affects all aspects of today’s society.”

Although small colleges have long been recognized for the high percentages of their science majors who complete undergraduate degrees, earn advanced degrees, and enter STEM careers, this seminar marks the first systematic attempt to promote this powerful pedagogy among faculty members at smaller independent colleges and universities. Wieman provided the inspiration for and has been the guiding force in developing the seminars, recommending the facilitators, providing the syllabus, and shaping the process.

Despite numerous studies that have demonstrated improved effectiveness if instruction were changed from traditional lectures to more effective, active learning methods—in the sciences as in other fields—research indicates that the lecture is still the default method for many faculty members.

Each institution supported a team of four faculty members from no more than two disciplines (biology, chemistry, or physics), including at least one department or division chair or dean. The team received intensive training to prepare them to implement and assess research-based active learning methods in introductory courses in their departments when they return to campus.

The first seminar took place July 15–19, 2019, at Holy Names University in Oakland, California. After the seminar, college faculty members will participate in webinars, as well as conference calls and a site visit for each institution.

Contact: Gita Sitaramiah, director of PR and internal communications, 612-330-1476.

About Augsburg. Augsburg University offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and 10 graduate degrees to 3,400 students of diverse backgrounds at its campus in the vibrant center of the Twin Cities and nearby Rochester, Minnesota, location. Augsburg educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings. Learn more at Augsburg.edu.

The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) is an association of 770 nonprofit independent colleges and universities, state-based councils of independent colleges, and other higher education affiliates, that works to support college and university leadership, advance institutional excellence, and enhance public understanding of independent higher education’s contributions to society. CIC is the major national organization that focuses on services to leaders of independent colleges and universities and state-based councils. CIC offers conferences, seminars, publications, and other programs and services that help institutions improve educational quality, administrative and financial performance, student outcomes, and institutional visibility. It conducts the largest annual conferences of college and university presidents and of chief academic officers. Founded in 1956, CIC is headquartered at One Dupont Circle in Washington, DC. For more information, visit www.cic.edu.

 

TPT’s Almanac features Business Department Chair Jeanne Boeh

Jeanne Boeh at TPT's Almanac.
Jeanne Boeh at TPT’s Almanac.

Jeanne Boeh, professor of economics and business department chair at Augsburg University, was recently a featured panelist on the weekly TPT news program, Almanac.

She provided commentary about trade, tariffs, and middle-class debt.

The panel included Boeh as well as a professor of economics from the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University and the dean of the University of St. Thomas Opus College of Business

Watch here.

Media Advisory: INSIDE OUT Portraits of 1,229 Augsburg University People Installed along Riverside Avenue in August

(Minneapolis) — Augsburg University is installing in August Each, Together, a Group Action of the INSIDE OUT Project, started by French street artist JR, that will include over 1,200 portraits. This installation in honor of Augsbug’s upcoming sesquicentennial will cover 10 campus building facades along Riverside Avenue.

INSIDE OUT Preview

Members of the media are invited to Augsburg on August 6 to photograph the installation as well as for interviews with the project’s lead organizer Associate Professor Christopher Houltberg. 

Expected to be the largest such project in the Twin Cities area, these portraits will create a tapestry of faces that celebrate, recognize and honor the people of Augsburg University over the past 150 years. Each of the 1,229 students, faculty, alumni, and staff will ultimately be present together.

Installation will take four weeks to complete along Riverside, beginning at Foss Center on 22nd and moving toward 25th Avenue South. These buildings will include the Flower Shop, Maintenance Facilities, Ice Arena, Anderson Music Hall, and Foss Center. 

Founded in 1869, Augsburg’s year-long sesquicentennial celebration launches in September 2019.

On August 6, media members are invited to interview Associate Professor Christopher Houltberg and photograph or videotape installation as it begins.

For details, contact: Gita Sitaramiah, Director of PR and Internal Communications. sitarami@augsburg.edu or 612-330-1476.

About Augsburg. Augsburg University offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and 10 graduate degrees to 3,400 students of diverse backgrounds at its campus in the vibrant center of the Twin Cities and nearby Rochester, Minnesota, location. Augsburg educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings. Learn more at Augsburg.edu.

River Semester to be joined by leading German scholars, artists

Augsburg University’s third River Semester starting in August will be part of a prestigious German initiative to explore the Mississippi River.

Mississippi. An Anthropocene River is a German research project involving many communities and initiatives along the river with a focus on climate change. Joining Augsburg students will be German travelers: Max Planck Institute and Goethe Institute scholars; field station members; journalists; authors, and artists.

This year’s River Semester voyagers will depart from Lake Itasca on Aug. 30 and, for 100 days, paddle portions of the Mississippi River ending in New Orleans. Students will earn 16-19 credits.

View the 2019 River Semester schedule.

See the Anthropocene River Journey description.

 

About Augsburg. Augsburg University offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and 10 graduate degrees to 3,400 students of diverse backgrounds at its campus in the vibrant center of the Twin Cities and nearby Rochester, Minnesota, location. Augsburg educates students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. An Augsburg education is defined by excellence in the liberal arts and professional studies, guided by the faith and values of the Lutheran church, and shaped by its urban and global settings. Learn more at Augsburg.edu.