Jingle Dress (William Eigen, 2014)

September 21, 2016

Jingle Dress (William Eigen, 2014)

The Augsburg Native American Film Series is happy to co-sponsor with Augsburg’s Student groups –AISA (Augsburg Indigenous Student Association) and Marginalized Voices in Film and Media–this free film screening on campus.   This feature length film is set and filmed in Minnesota and William Eigen will be there to talk with you about the film!

Desert Storm veteran John Red Elk gets word from his relatives that his long lost Uncle Norton is dead and vows to go down to the big city to find out what really happened to him. At its heart ‘The Jingle Dress’ is an immigrant story of an Ojibwe family that moves from the rural setting of a  Reservation in northern Minnesota down to the heart of the urban ‘hood’ of Minneapolis. We follow the Red Elk family as they discover this new culture and through their experiences and unvarnished perspective we are able to view our own culture with fresh eyes, as well as gain insight into their ancient, indigenous society.
-Bill Eigen

 

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Conversation with Filmmaker and Reception 3:45
Screening begins at 4:00

This event is free to the public

For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number.

 

 

NDNZ in the City

November 2

NDNZ in the City: Multi-media narratives of American Indian culture in the heart of Los Angeles, California 

Join us for an evening of talk, short films, photographs, and personal stories from Indigenous multimedia documentarian, Pamela Peters (Navajo).  The evening’s event will showcase Peter’s newest film Legacy of Exiled NDNZ and multimedia presentation Real NDNZ re-take Hollywood.  Pamela’s work stands against prevalent stereotypes of American Indians in popular culture by pushing viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native American in mass media.

 

ExiledWelcome copy Legacy of Exiled NDNZ discusses the historical US policies of relocation of Indians to urban establishment and the legacy it has created to today. It provides a narrative of seven native adults currently living in Los Angeles. Shot in a neorealist visual aesthetic reminiscent of Kent Mackenzie’s 1961 film, The Exiles, we catch a glimpse of the group of urban Indians living their hopes and dreams in the city.

Real NDNZ re-take Hollywood showcases native adults in photographs to disrupt and decolonize clichéd portrayals of Native actors. The series “re-takes” and creates classic, iconic portraits of PamelaJ_Peters_030(1)movies stars of yesteryears by replacing those past film icons with contemporary Native American actors.  The project shows real Indian actors in the elegant clothes and iconic poses of James Dean, Audrey Hepburn, Tony Curtis and others from the classic period of Hollywood films – rather than in the buckskin, feathers, and painted faces featured in most Hollywood films of Indians.


 

About Pamela Peters  88fc07385371ef536654f9c9cea0fa4d

Pamela J. Peters is an Indigenous multimedia documentarian born and raised on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. Her current multimedia project, Legacy of Exiled NDNZ began as a short film that has expanded into a full-length documentary along with an ongoing multimedia component about the history of American Indians living in Los Angeles. To date, she has spoken at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, UCLA, California State Polytechnic University, Pitzer College, Cal Arts, UC-San Diego, UC-Riverside, UC-Irvine, Occidental College, Northwestern University and University of Oregon.

Her work presents personal stories of contemporary urban Indians in photography and film to commemorate the legacy of the Indian Relocation program, a U.S. federal program enacted to assimilate American Indians in the 1950s. Her short film Legacy of Exiled NDNZ premiered at the Los Angeles Short Fest, and continues to be screened at short film festivals nationally and internationally. Legacy of Exiled NDNZ photo essay was exhibited at 118 Winston Street Gallery, and Venice Arts Gallery as part of the Summer Juried Exhibition: “Ecotone| Boundaries, Tensions, Integrations.”

Her mission is to combat the idea of the static, stereotypical Indian portrayed so pervasively in all media. She wants people to know that Indians are many nations with many stories. Pamela’s portraits stand against prevalent stereotypes of American Indians in popular culture. Having grown up on the reservation in Arizona her experience of Indian life was not reflected in popular culture. She made it her dream to produce authentic portraits and stories of the persistence of Indian life in contemporary contexts.  As a storyteller, she develops photographic narratives that illustrate the real stories of American Indians within their communities. Her goal is to represent the beauty and complexity of their lives in their personal settings, and to humanize them in a way rarely done in mass media. Through her work, she intends to re-appropriate harmful stereotypes.
Pamela’s multimedia work reflects the perseverance of American Indian cultural identities today. She produces living portraits of American Indians reflected through an indigenous aesthetic lens. Pamela works as a culture consultant and native talent referral for many networks such as: FX, Comedy Central, HBO and MTV. She has also professionally produced five award winning films for the Southern California Indian Center’s InterTribal Entertainment multimedia program, co-created film workshops for Native youth, produced PSA’s for Fox Studio’s American Indian Summer Institute program, and co-hosted “Bringing the Circle Together,” a monthly showcase of Indigenous documentaries at the Japanese American National Museum National Center for Preservation of Democracy Tateuchi Forum in Los Angeles.

Pamela’s work pushes viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native Americans in mass media. Pamela has a BA in American Indian Studies and Film Television from UCLA.

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, Augsburg’s Marginalized Voices in Film and Media, and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number.

For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

March Point

April  21, 2016

250x353edu_march_pointMARCH POINT filmmakers Tracy Rector and Annie Silverstein bring together filmmaking and alternative education through their collaboration with the three young Native Americans. The film assignment sends the boys down a path of historical investigation. Like many young people, Travis, Nick and Cody didn’t know much about their ancestors’ history. By interviewing tribal elders, they learn that most of their land was taken away by the federal government in the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855, leaving the Swinomish with basic health care, some fishing rights and a small reservation. President Ulysses S. Grant took more land in 1870, a move the tribe considers illegal.

The boys learn that the people now known as the Swinomish flourished on the bounty of the coast of the Pacific Northwest for thousands of years. Clams, crabs and fish were plentiful, and as the tribal saying goes, “When the tide’s out, the table’s set.” But when in the 1950s, Shell Oil built two refineries on land once owned by the tribe, chemicals made their way into the water, tainting the seafood and shellfish that the Swinomish eat daily. And just as the toxins in the water seeped into the food, poverty, drugs and alcohol have seeped into the lives of the families who live there. Ambivalent environmental ambassadors at the onset of the filmmaking venture, the boys awaken to the destruction these refineries have wrought in their communities. Grappling with their assignment through humor, sarcasm and a candid self-knowledge, they begin to experience the need to understand and tell their own stories and to grasp the power of this process to change their lives and give back to their community. MARCH POINT follows the boys’ journey on their path from childhood to adulthood as they come to understand themselves, their tribe and the environmental threat to their people.

Location and Time:
University of St. Thomas
John Roach Center auditorium (JRC 126), which is located on the corner of Summit and Cleveland Avenues.
Building 2 on St. Thomas Campus Map
3:30-5:00

Thank you to our sponsors:
Augsburg College
American Indian Studies Department
American Culture and Difference Program, University of St. Thomas
Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota

Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making us Sick?

February 15, 2016

Bad Sugar

Bad Sugar, episode four of the seven part PBS’ series  Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?, focuses on the reasons for high diabetes rates in the Pima and Tohono O’odham of southern Arizona and other Native American peoples.

The Pima and Tohono O’odham Indians of southern Arizona have arguably the highest diabetes rates in the world – half of all adults are afflicted. But a century ago, diabetes was virtually unknown here. Researchers have poked and prodded the Pima for decades in search of a biological – or more recently, genetic – explanation for their high rates of disease. Meanwhile, medical-only interventions have failed to stem the rising tide not just among Native Americans, but globally.

What happened to the health of the Pima? During the 20th century, the diversion of river water to upstream white settlements disrupted the Pima’s agricultural economy and customary ways. Local tribes were plunged into poverty and became dependent on the U.S. government. Healthy traditional foods like tepary beans, cholla buds, and wild game were replaced by surplus commodities like white flour, lard, processed cheese and canned foods – a diabetic’s nightmare. A sense of “futurelessness” took hold, and so did diabetes.

According to Dr. Don Warne, a trained physician and traditional Lakota healer who works with the Pima, health problems like diabetes begin long before people get to the clinic or the hospital. While obesity and diet are risk factors, so is poverty. People in the lowest income brackets are at least twice as likely to become diabetic as those in the highest. For the O’odham and other Native Americans, the stress of living in poverty is compounded by a history of cultural, economic and physical loss, which researchers believe magnifies its impact on health.

Attorney Rod Lewis has spent the last several decades fighting to restore his tribe’s water rights. In 2004 he helped negotiate the largest water settlement in Arizona history, which not only guaranteed the return of water but provided crucial funds to build roads, dams and other infrastructure. Now the Pima are beginning to farm again. Leaders are cautiously optimistic that community empowerment, along with sustainable and culturally appropriate development can help restore prosperity, hope, and health.  (http://www.unnaturalcauses.org/episode_descriptions.php?page=4)

About our Presenter:

Donald Warne, (Oglala Lakota) MD, MPH is Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Health in the College of Health Professions at North Dakota State University, and he is the Senior Policy Advisor to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board.  Dr. Warne is a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe from Pine Ridge, SD and comes from a long line of traditional healers and medicine men.  He received his MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and his MPH from Harvard School of Public Health.

Professional activities include:

  • Member, National Board of Directors, American Cancer Society
  • Member, Minority Affairs Section and Association of American Indian Physicians Representative to the American Medical Association
  • Member, Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, US Department of Health and Human Services
  • Member, Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Member, National Institutional Review Board, Indian Health Service

Location and Time

Augsburg College

Reception in Sverdrup Hall, Main Lobby 5:00-6:00
Screening begins at 6:00 in Science Hall 123
Discussion with Dr. Warne follows
This event is free to the public

 

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, The Batalden Seminar in Applied Ethics, the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota,

 

For parking permits contact Christina Erickson at ericksoc@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/.  You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

Mazinaateseg: Anishinaabe Films and Their Makers

 

March 9, 2016

Mazinaateseg: Anishinaabe Films and Their Makers

According to the Ojibwe People’s Dictionary, Mazinaateseg means “It is a movie” in Ojibwe.   Join us for a night of Anishinaabe short and animated films hosted by Elizabeth Day and Heid E. Erdrich.

Some of our titles for the evening include:

ATM2 image 2

Advice To Myself 2: Resistance  (Elizabeth Day, Heid E. Erdrich and Louise Erdrich with music by Trevino Brings Plenty.
Shot on the coldest and snowiest day of the year, Advice to Myself 2: Resistance presents a visual and verbal collaboration between author Louise Erdrich, her poet sister Heid E. Erdrich, and artist Elizabeth Day.  A figure dressed as a bear moves through a frozen yet domestic landscape, at times using a blade to practice martial arts moves, at other times carrying a baby in a woven carrier–all the while her movements juxtapose the voice of Louise Erdrich speaking a poem.  Text enters the scene at moments as well.  Throughout the “poemeo” as Louise calls the form, the bear gives us clues to her indigenous identity in her jingle dress moves, her beaded mukluks, the willow basket she carries.  The words of the poem offer a message of personal, political and universal resistance.  In the last moments, the bear’s identity is briefly revealed.

GAA-ONDINANG DAKWAANOWED MAKWA/ How the Bear Got a Short Tail (Directed by Elizabeth Day, written and voiced by Anna Gibbs, produced by Heid E. Erdrich for Wiigwaas Press/Birchbark House. Animated by Jonathan Thunder. 2015.)
Narrated by elder Anna Gibbs entirely in Anishinaabemowin, the language of the Ojibwe people, “Gaa-ondinang dakawaanowed Makwa” or “How the Bear Got A Short Tail,” tells a story about gifts of the Creator and a lesson in humility.  In this fully animated Anishinaabemowin tale, we meet Makwa, the bear, who brags up his gorgeous tail and enrages bushy-tailed Fox.  Many woodland creatures appear as they were before the Creator gave them their gifts, such as Skunk whose stripes are yet to appear. Seasons, the heavens, and the creatures of the lake and woods figure prominently in this story for those learning the Anishinaabe language.

Gii-mawinzowaad Makoons Miinawaa Nigigoons (Directed by Elizabeth Day, animated by Jonathan Thunder)
Written in Anishinaabemowin by Rose Tainter and Lisa LaRonge and adapted to the screen by Director Elizabeth Day and animated by Jonathan Thunder.

 

UndeadFaerieIndiaPaleAle Still Coffee ShopUndead Faerie Goes Great with India Pale Ale (Heid E. Erdrich/Jonathan Thunder, 2015)

 

returning_690Returning (Elizabeth LaPensée and edited by Sky Hopinka, 2015).
Stories of space canoes and space/time travel across dimensions unravel to “Trade Song” by the Métis Fiddler Quartet in this bitwork beadwork experimental stop motion animation.


The Path Without End 
(Elizabeth LaPensée, 2011) Non-linear stories of Anishinaabe Moon thepathwithoutendPeople unravel in this stop motion animation set to music by Cree cellist Cris Derksen. Named in honor of Basil Johnston

The Sleeping Dead (Written, Directed and Edited by Frankie McNamara, 2015).

This is a short film about a college student who sleeps at random times but can’t sleep at night. He is going through a transformation from human to zombie. Is it reality or just a dream? This film is a combination of a comedy and horror film.

 

 

 

About our Hosts and Filmmakers:Heid Erdrich by Chris Felver 15

Heid E. Erdrich’s collaborative poem films have been selected for screening at festivals in the U.S. and Canada including ImagineNative, Co-Kisser, Vision Maker, Iron Horse Review, and at the Santa Fe Indian Market Class-X film competition. These films have won a Judges Award, a Best of Fest, and two Best Experimental Short awards. She is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Cell Traffic from University of Arizona Press. Her recent non-fiction book is Original Local: Indigenous Food Stories. Heid grew up in Wahpeton, North Dakota and is Ojibwe enrolled at Turtle Mountain. She teaches the MFA Creative Writing program of Augsburg College.

 

headshotElizabeth Day (producer, director, writer) Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe  is a filmmaker from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Born on the Leech Lake Reservation and raised in the Twin Cities area, Day blends her Native American heritage with her urban upbringing to create films that employ traditional Ojibwe-style storytelling while using contemporary filmmaking techniques. Her work often explores the tension between traditional Native teachings and the life of a modern, urban Indian.
A primary motivation for Day is recording and capturing the quickly fading pastimes of Ojibwe culture, an important and integral piece of Minnesota’s history. Through the medium of film, she examines a broad swath of Native history, from the rich Ojibwe tradition of storytelling to the painful history of government-enforced boarding schools to the modern-day identity issues faced by Native families

lapensee_portrait

 

Elizabeth LaPensée  is an Anishinaabe, Métis, and Irish artist whose works in digital art, games, animations, and comics speak to teachings and stories that span spacetime. With over ten years of developing her aesthetic along with holding a Ph.D. in Interactive Arts & Technology, she continues to expand her body of work in the hopes of continuing the ways in which Woodlands style expresses scientific knowledge and the truths in traditional stories.

Her prior work includes: Survivance (2011), The Nature of Snakes (2012), The Path Without End (2011), and The West Was Lost (2008)

 

Jonathan with BunnyJonathan Thunder (painter, digital media artist) is a painter and digital media artist currently residing in Duluth, Minnesota. He has attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and received a Bachelor’s Degree in Visual Effects and Motion Graphics from the Art Institutes International Minnesota. His work has been featured in many state, regional, and national exhibitions, as well as in local and international publications.

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Frankie McNamara (film student) is from St. Paul, Minnesota. His family is from Red Lake Nation of Ojibwe and his mother Brenda Child is a professor of American Studies and American Indian studies at the University of Minnesota.  He is currently a film student at Augsburg College, where he is learning the craft of filmmaking and creating short films.

Location and Time:

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Talk with Students 5:00-6:00
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public.

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, Augsburg’s Marginalized Voices in Film and Media, the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit: please contact marubbio@augsburg.edu.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

 

CELEBRATING SÁMI WOMEN IN FILM

April 6, 2016
CELEBRATING SÁMI WOMEN IN FILM

Filmmaker Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Kainai Nation–Blood Reserve, Blackfoot Confederacy/Sámi) presents Celebrating Sámi Women in Film, a collection of innovative short films by Sámi women.  From the first people of Scandinavia, the Sámi, comes an outpouring of dynamic voices. Like the diverse lived realities of Indigenous peoples the world over, Sámi cinema spans the multitude of human experience through a distinctly northern lens. Within the Indigenous film community, women are held up – respected for their guidance, celebrated for their achievements, and valued for their contributions.

Some of the films for the evening include:

AREDGIRLSREASONING.Still.2   A Red Girl’s Reasoning  (Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers, 2014, Canada/Norway)
“After the justice system fails the survivor of a brutal, racially-driven sexual assault, she becomes a motorcycle-riding, ass-kicking vigilante who takes on the attackers of other women who’ve suffered the same fate.”

 

 

Bihttoš ( Rebel ) (Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers, 2014, Canada/Norway)Bihttos_TheatricalPoster
Mixing archival footage, re-enactments and animation, Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers’ deeply personal documentary Bihttoš (Eng. Rebel) explores how past injustices impacted the marriage of her mother, who is of Blackfoot descent, and her Sami father.

 

 

Jorinda’s Resa (Jorinda’s Journey) (Liselotte Wasjedt, 2014, Sweden)
This drama takes place in a magnificent landscape with high mountains. During her journey Jorindas resa-1Jorinda meets resistance in the guise of a snow storm and she is almost frozen to death. But the real enemy is within Jorinda herself. She has to find her own inner strength. She has to take charge of her life. The project was inspired by Ann-Marie Ljungberg’s book Resan till Kautokeino (The Journey to Kautokeino).

 

Eahpáraš (Stillborn) (Anne Merete Gaup, 2012, Norway)
A terrifying Sámi folktale of the haunting spirit of a dead newborn child is brought to cinematic incarnation in this impressive horror debut.

12_g1.0000001Stoerre Vaerie (Amanda Kernell,2015)  Elle, 78, does not like Sami people – though her first language was Sami and she grew up in the mountains in Lapland. Now she claims that she is completely Swedish and from the south. Under pressure from her son, she reluctantly returns north for her sister’s funeral. As they are about to leave, she understands that her son has planned for them stay with their relatives over night. Refusing to do so, Elle checks in at the local Grand hotel with all the tourists…

Stoerre Vaerie (Northern Great Mountain) had it’s world premiere at Sundance Film Festival in january 2015. The Swedish premiere was at Göteborg International Film Festival where it won the Best Swedish Short Audience Award. The film has also won Best Short Drama at ImagineNATIVE 2015, Canada, and Best Swedish Short Film 2015 at Uppsala Shortfilm festival 2015. In 2016 the film competes at Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival and is nominated Best Short for the 2015 Guldbagge Awards, Sweden’s national film awards. The film is distributed by Theo Tsappos at The Swedish Film Institute.

 

About the Filmmakers:

Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers  indexis a member of the Kainai Nation (Blood Reserve, Blackfoot Confederacy) and Sámi from Norway.  She graduated from University of British Columbia with a Bachelor’s Degree in First Nations Studies. Her award-winning works – often rooted in social justice – explore innovative means of telling stories. She is a recipient of the Vancouver Mayor’s Arts Award and a Kodak Image Award for her work as an emerging filmmaker, and was also included in the CBC list “Indigenous Youth Leaders: 5 Under 30 to Watch in 2015.” Her most recent short, Bihttoš, was included in the TIFF Top Ten Canadian Shorts and has been nominated for a 2016 Canadian Screen Award.
  She was nominated for a 2015 Leo award for her performance in Not Indian Enough.

Her Filmography includes:

  • Bihttoš (2014, 14 min, documentary, Canada/Norway)
  • Hurry Up, You Stupid Cripple (2013, 10 min, documentary, Canada)  co-directed by Tailfeathers with Gitx’san filmmaker Terreane Derrick.
  • Colonial Gaze: The Sámi Artists’ Collective (2012, 10 min, mockumentary, Norway/Sweden)
  • A Red Girl’s Reasoning (2012, 10 min, drama, Canada)
  • Bloodland  (2011, 4 min, experimental, Canada)

Liselotte Wasjedt was born in 1973 in Kiruna, with her Sámi roots in Nedre Soppero, Sweden.  Liselotte works full time as an artist and filmmaker. Her education includes painting and arts from different schools in Sweden: Project programme in free Art at Royal institute of art as well as animation and experimental filmmaking with special emphasis on documentary storytelling and scriptwriting; Bachelor of Arts in Expression in Convergent Media, 2010 at Gotland University.

Anne Merete Gaup, born 1982 and raised in a Sámi reindeer herder family has strong traditions in storytelling.  Since that she has been in film school and is now working as a Producer and director for the sami childrens TV-station NRK Sapmi.  She brings her Sámi storytelling heritage to life through her films. Anne Merete debuted at imagineNATIVE 2012 with the chilling Eahpáraš.  

Amanda Kernell, 1986, and south Sámi from northern Sweden, graduated in film directing from The National Film School of Denmark in 2013. Since 2006, Amanda has directed several acclaimed shorts including Stoerre Vaerie, which premiered at Sundance and has won several awards including Best Swedish Short at Göteborg International film festival and Uppsala film festival and Best Short Drama at IMAGINEnative. The film was also nominated to the Swedish academy award Guldbaggen in 2016.

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Discussion with Students  5:00-6:00
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public

 

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota, Augsburg’s Marginalized Voices in Film and Media,

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

First Light: Sisters of Sunrise

October 21

First Light: Sisters of Sunrise. The world is on the horizon of a new and powerful wave of innovative film, animation and new media producers, directors and revolutionaries who are shifting the way filmmaking is seen and produced. Join us for a special screening of films that explore the power women filmmakers have as keepers of our genesis and creators of legacy and legend. Our event is hosted by filmmaker Missy Whiteman (Northern Arapaho and Kickapoo) and includes selected work of other Indigenous women filmmakers and animators.

Some of our titles for the evening:

NAWA GIIZHIGONG (Missy Whiteman)GabeCrouch copy
Two friends are faced with a shocking tragedy on the day they happen to discuss the theoretical beginnings of life and the universe. The resolution of the dire event reveals a new understanding of life and death, in relation to their own origin story

 
 ONCE_STill
 Once Upon a Time (Missy Whiteman)
 Inspired by the Indigenous people of Turtle Island and the ancestors who we follow. Seen through the eyes of a child, our world today and our return to living in our truth as sacred people.
EndingField-LOW
The Coyote Way: Going Back Home (Concept Trailer) (Missy Whiteman)
Reality and ancient lore merge in a vivid, dream-like voyage for a Charlie, a young boy who must choose between joining a street gang or begin a journey to discover his destiny.

 

Indigo3 Indigo (Amanda Strong, 2014)
Indigo is a beautifully rendered animation inspired by Indigenous ideologies and personal experience. It tells the story of a woman who confronts her internal war with the help of grandmother spider and faces the many layers of herself and life, to revitalize her spirit. Indigo examines the implications of the decline of the imagination concurrent with the rise of rationality and the cyclical war these two archetypes engage in.

 

 

Honey for Sale (Amanda Strong, 2009)Honey-for-Sale
The tenuous life of the honeybee sheds light on the fragile nature of human existence.

Mia (Amanda Strong, 2015)
A young Indigenous female street artist named Mia’ walks through the city streets painting scenes rooted in the supernatural history of her people. Lacking cultural resources and familial connection within the city, she paints these images from intuition and blood memory. She has not heard the stories from her Elders lips, but has found her own methods to rediscover them. The alleyways become her sanctuary and secret gallery, and her art comes to life. Mia’ is pulled into her own transformation via the vessel of a salmon. In the struggle to return home, she traverses through polluted waters and skies, witnessing various forms of industrial violence and imprint that have occurred upon the land.

 

MayorShiprockMayor of Ship Rock ( Ramona Emerson)
A feature-length documentary by Reel Indian Pictures–we will screen the trailer.  In the town of Shiprock, New Mexico, poverty and corruption have long been a struggle and as the Navajo Nation looks for leadership, it is met with scandal. To make a change, a young group of men and women are taking back their community–led by 21-year-old Graham Beyale. This is the story of how one vision toward the future can make a difference, inspiring a generation of leaders to make changes in their own communities.  For more information on this project visit http://www.shiprockexperience.org/  To contact Ramona Emerson regarding Reel Indian Pictures:  www.reelindianpictures.com  To learn more about Ramona Emerson:  http://about.me/reelindianpictures

 

indexWakening (Danis Goulet, 2013) In the near future, the environment has been destroyed and society suffocates under a brutal military occupation. A lone Cree wanderer, Wesakechak, searches an urban war zone to find the ancient and dangerous Weetigo to help fight against the occupiers.

For more information on the Embargo Collective: http://www.imaginenative.org/home/embargo.  Also read her blog : http://www.imaginenative.org/wordpress/2014/04/welcome-to-the-embargo-collective-ii-blog-intro-by-danis-goulet

 

About out our host Missy Whiteman

MWhitemanHS_2015Missy Whiteman (Northern Arapaho and

Kickapoo) understands her work to be a voice for her ancestors to educate and to foster better understanding among all peoples as well as to promote positive change in Native and Non-Native communities. While based in part on traditional ways and ideas, her work also addresses themes of loss in relation to larger cultural forces as well as the process of healing and redefining cultural identity. Many of Missy’s short videos incorporate, Indigenous languages, teachings and values and have screened in tribal communities, local film festivals to national venues such as National Geographic All Roads Festival.

Rooted in the arts at an early age, Missy was raised in an artistic environment, with her biggest influence being her father who taught her how to envision the world though the artist eye. Missy Whiteman’s upbringing in Minneapolis, Minnesota gave her the opportunity to be exposed to Native artists and filmmakers from many different Nations as well as other creative people from various ethnic backgrounds. Missy continued her pursuit in the arts when she attended the Minnesota Center for Arts education where her artistic and healing creative process were first developed . She later attended the Minneapolis College for Art and Design for Filmmaking and photography where she continued developed her skills as a media artist and filmmaker.

Today, Missy works as an independent consultant with Independent Indigenous Film and media. IIFM’s mission is to help educate, and create better visibility for Indigenous media by providing digital media production, training and visibility for media for communities, organizations and youth. Projects developed and produced with the guidance of IIFM, carry the vision and the message of spiritual healing through digital media.

 

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Missy Talks with Students 5:00-6:00
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public

 

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, Augsburg’s Women in Film Student Group, the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota, and Independent Indigenous Film and Media (IIFM)2whirl

 

 

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

March Point

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April 21, 2015

MARCH POINT filmmakers Tracy Rector and Annie Silverstein bring together filmmaking and alternative education through their collaboration with the three young Native Americans. The film assignment sends the boys down a path of historical investigation. Like many young people, Travis, Nick and Cody didn’t know much about their ancestors’ history. By interviewing tribal elders, they learn that most of their land was taken away by the federal government in the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855, leaving the Swinomish with basic health care, some fishing rights and a small reservation. President Ulysses S. Grant took more land in 1870, a move the tribe considers illegal.

The boys learn that the people now known as the Swinomish flourished on the bounty of the coast of the Pacific Northwest for thousands of years. Clams, crabs and fish were plentiful, and as the tribal saying goes, “When the tide’s out, the table’s set.” But when in the 1950s, Shell Oil built two refineries on land once owned by the tribe, chemicals made their way into the water, tainting the seafood and shellfish that the Swinomish eat daily. And just as the toxins in the water seeped into the food, poverty, drugs and alcohol have seeped into the lives of the families who live there. Ambivalent environmental ambassadors at the onset of the filmmaking venture, the boys awaken to the destruction these refineries have wrought in their communities. Grappling with their assignment through humor, sarcasm and a candid self-knowledge, they begin to experience the need to understand and tell their own stories and to grasp the power of this process to change their lives and give back to their community. MARCH POINT follows the boys’ journey on their path from childhood to adulthood as they come to understand themselves, their tribe and the environmental threat to their people.

 

_MG_6826-2Mde Mka Ska Canoe Nation Gathering–(Migizi Communications). The Mde Maka Ska Canoe Nations Gathering annual event is a genuine opportunity for Native American youth, parents, and community to re-engage the sacredness of water or mni wakan. Today, the Mde Maka Ska is called Lake Calhoun. Its Dakota name means White Earth Lake. For the Minneapolis-St. Paul Native American community, its proximity inspires an indigenous means to return to cultural, emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual health. As water does for the finned nation, the Mde Maka Ska provides an appropriate environment in which to implement visions of healthier indigenous nations. Narrated by Sicangu Lakota experiential educator and event founder LeMoine LaPointe, this video by Tiana LaPointe and John Gwinn looks at the history of how and why the event started, as well as details of the 2013 event.

 

Location and Time:

University of St. Thomas
O’Shaughnessy Educational Center Auditorium (building #5 on map)
Located on Cleveland Ave. (The nearest cross-streets being Ashland Avenue and Portland Avenue)
5:30-8:30

 

Thank you to our sponsors:
Augsburg College
American Indian Studies Department
American Culture and Difference Program, University of St. Thomas
Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota
Migizi Communications

MIGIZI_LOGO

 

Profit and Loss

March 24, 2015

 

Standing on Sacred Ground - Image 3

From the acclaimed series Standing on Sacred Ground, Profit and Loss documents how indigenous groups from Papua New Guinea to the tar sands of Alberta, Canada fight the loss of land, water and health to mining and oil industries.

From New Guinean rainforests to Canada’s tar sands, Profit and Loss exposes industrial threats to native peoples’ health, livelihood and cultural survival. In Papua New Guinea, a nickel mine that violently relocated villagers to taboo land is building a new pipeline and refinery, and dumping mining waste into the sea. In Alberta, First Nations people suffer from rare cancers as their traditional hunting grounds are stripmined to unearth the world’s third-largest oil reserve. Rare verité scenes of tribal life and intimate interviews allow indigenous people to tell their own stories—and confront us with the ethical consequences of our culture of consumption. Narrated by Graham Greene (Oneida).

– See more at: http://www.sacredland.org/home/films/in-production/#sthash.idNCx6hF.dpuf

 

About Our Hosts: Dr. Cecilia Martinez (The Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy) and Tom Goldtooth (Indigenous Environmental Network)

ceciliaDr. Cecilia Martinez, Director of Research Programs.  Dr. Cecilia Martinez previous positions include Associate Research Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean and Environment at the University of Delaware,  Associate Professor at Metropolitan State University and Research Director at the American Indian Policy Center. Dr. Martinez has led a variety of projects to address sustainable development at the local and international levels. Her research is focused on the development of energy and environmental strategies that promote equitable and sustainable policies. She currently serves on the Climate Action Planning Steering Committee for the City of Minneapolis. Dr. Martinez has also worked with a range of organizations from local grassroots groups to international organizations engaging in the promotion of sound environmental policy and environmental justice. Most recently she completed an analysis of coal-based energy and environmental justice communities, and a review of climate adaptation and public health for the National Environmental Justice Leadership Forum on Climate Change. She has been appointed to several national advisory boards including, the National Advisory Committee to the EPA for the Council on Environmental Cooperation, and the Research Working Group for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. She is also on the leadership team for the national EJ and Science Initiative, and is leading the effort on a Truth and Reconciliation Commission on environmental harms. She is working on a manuscript on environmental justice and climate change and among her other publications is the co-edited volume Environmental Justice: Discourses in International Political Economy which includes some of her work on North American Indigenous peoples and the challenge of forging a common agenda of indigenous rights, justice and sustainability. She received her B.A. from Stanford University and her Ph.D. from the University of Delaware’s College of Urban Affairs and Public Policy, where she received the Ryden Prize for Best Dissertation in the Social Sciences. (CEED)

The Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy (CEED) was founded by a group of researchers, educators and community activists who saw the need to affirm and revitalize principles of democracy and social justice in energy and environmental policy. The founders saw the need for quality policy research and education to create a more honest and accountable system for preserving our social and environmental heritage. CEED proudly joins with a long tradition of individuals and communities who have actively worked to keep the Earth healthy for future generations.

 

tom_profile_picTom Goldtooth is Dine’ and Dakota and lives in Minnesota. Since the late 1980’s, Tom has been involved with environmental related issues and programs working within tribal governments in developing indigenous-based environmental protection infrastructures. Tom works with indigenous peoples worldwide. Tom is known as one of the environmental justice movement grassroots leaders in North America addressing toxics and health, mining, energy, climate, water, globalization, sustainable development and indigenous rights issues. Tom is one of the founders of the Durban Group for Climate Justice; co-founder of Climate Justice NOW!; a co-founder of the U.S. based Environmental Justice Climate Change initiative and a member of the International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change that operates as the indigenous caucus within the United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change. Tom is a policy adviser to indigenous communities on environmental protection and more recently on climate policy focusing on mitigation, adaptation and concerns of false solutions. (Indigenous Environmental Network)

Established in 1990 within the United States, IEN was formed by grassroots Indigenous peoples and individuals to address environmental and economic justice issues. IEN’s activities include building the capacity of Indigenous communities and tribal governments to develop mechanisms to protect our sacred sites, land, water, air, natural resources, health of both our people and all living things, and to build economically sustainable communities. IEN accomplishes this by maintaining an informational clearinghouse, organizing campaigns, direct actions and public awareness, building the capacity of community and tribes to address environmental justice issues, development of initiatives to impact policy, and building alliances among Indigenous communities, tribes, inter-tribal and Indigenous organizations, people-of-color/ethnic organizations, faith-based and women groups, youth, labor, environmental organizations and others. IEN convenes local, regional and national meetings on environmental and economic justice issues, and provides support, resources and referral to Indigenous communities and youth throughout primarily North America – and in recent years – globally.

 

 

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion to follow

Thank you to our sponsors:
Augsburg College
American Indian Studies Department
Environmental Studies Program
Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota
Center for Earth, Energy, and Democracy
Indigenous Environmental Network

178950_229751067139958_645183045_nIEN-234x300

Fire and Ice

February 10, 2015Standing on Sacred Ground - Image 5

Fire and Ice is the part of the acclaimed series Standing on Sacred GroundFire and Ice explores two mountain cultures fighting to protect their cultural and ecological heritage with the help of modern science. In the Gamo Highlands of Ethiopia, spiritual traditions that long protected trees, meadows and mountains are under attack by evangelical Christians. During a New Years bridal ceremony, tensions erupt into a riot. In the Peruvian Andes, Q’eros potato farmers face an invisible foe: global warming that is melting the glaciers, their only water source. They still make their annual pilgrimage to pray for abundance, and they are also building the Parque de la Papa (Potato Park), a community research farm to adapt indigenous agriculture to the changing climate. Stunning landscapes and vivid ritual scenes offer rare insight into little-seen, oft-misunderstood cultures. Narrated by Graham Greene (Oneida), with storytelling by Q’orianka Kilcher.

About Our Host: Dr. Cecilia Martinez and The Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy

ceciliaDr. Cecilia Martinez, Director of Research Programs.  Dr. Cecilia Martinez previous positions include Associate Research Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean and Environment at the University of Delaware,  Associate Professor at Metropolitan State University and Research Director at the American Indian Policy Center. Dr. Martinez has led a variety of projects to address sustainable development at the local and international levels. Her research is focused on the development of energy and environmental strategies that promote equitable and sustainable policies. She currently serves on the Climate Action Planning Steering Committee for the City of Minneapolis. Dr. Martinez has also worked with a range of organizations from local grassroots groups to international organizations engaging in the promotion of sound environmental policy and environmental justice. Most recently she completed an analysis of coal-based energy and environmental justice communities, and a review of climate adaptation and public health for the National Environmental Justice Leadership Forum on Climate Change. She has been appointed to several national advisory boards including, the National Advisory Committee to the EPA for the Council on Environmental Cooperation, and the Research Working Group for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. She is also on the leadership team for the national EJ and Science Initiative, and is leading the effort on a Truth and Reconciliation Commission on environmental harms. She is working on a manuscript on environmental justice and climate change and among her other publications is the co-edited volume Environmental Justice: Discourses in International Political Economy which includes some of her work on North American Indigenous peoples and the challenge of forging a common agenda of indigenous rights, justice and sustainability. She received her B.A. from Stanford University and her Ph.D. from the University of Delaware’s College of Urban Affairs and Public Policy, where she received the Ryden Prize for Best Dissertation in the Social Sciences.

178950_229751067139958_645183045_nThe Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy (CEED) was founded by a group of researchers, educators and community activists who saw the need to affirm and revitalize principles of democracy and social justice in energy and environmental policy. The founders saw the need for quality policy research and education to create a more honest and accountable system for preserving our social and environmental heritage. CEED proudly joins with a long tradition of individuals and communities who have actively worked to keep the Earth healthy for future generations.

 

 

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion to follow

Thank you to our sponsors:
Augsburg College
American Indian Studies Department
Environmental Studies Program
Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota
Center for Earth, Energy, and Democracy