CELEBRATING NATIVE VOICES: SHORT FICTION AND DOCUMENTARY FILMS BY NATIVE AMERICAN FILMMAKERS

 

April 11

Join us for a night of short films that include fantasy-drama, hybrid poetry, narrative and documentary.  Our screening will include conversations with the filmmakers about their work.

 

Missing Indigenous (LaRonn Katchia, director; Issac Trimball, producer, 2017)
Set in a rural reservation town, Missing Indigenous begins as two detectives, played by Solomon Trimble (Sam Uley of Twilight), and Isaac Trimble (Producer) investigate the homicide of a young woman marked with a killer’s deadly signature. With the assistance of entomologist Brett Rivers, played by actor David Velarde, the detectives soon realize Brett may have a lead on this murderer’s lethal trademark. Taking them on a mysterious journey through the dense forests of the reservation, the detectives are soon on the trail of an elusive, faceless killer. What unfolds is a heart wrenching story of a silent epidemic, the disappearance of Native American and Indigenous women. The film won “Best Film” and “Best Cinematography” at the Portalnd 48 Hour Film Festival.

 

This is Who I Am (Manuel Ibanez (Quechua, Director), Kalvin Hartwig (Anishinaabe, Producer), Janene Yazzie (Dine, Co-Writer), Andrea Landry (Anishinaabe, Co-Writer), Marie-Celine Einish (Naskapi, Protagonist) and Yanis Ait Mohamed (Kabyle, Director of Photography), 2017).

“This is Who I Am” is the story of a young Ojibwe woman seeking to reconnect to her language and culture in the big city. The creative team of filmmakers’ hope is that the film will inspire more Indigenous youth to be proud of their heritage and to take responsibility for their languages, cultures, land and rights. The world is a better place with rich linguistic and cultural diversity and a strengthened identity can help Indigenous youth overcome barriers.

 

My Once Life (Pamela J. Peters, 2016)
“My Once Life” is a hybrid video poem about the continuing impact of colonization on tribal peoples.  Native people resist their violent history and contemporary political Image of My Once Lifestruggles through engaging with deep historical knowledge and creating new oral histories.  I asked my native female friends to read my poem for a few reasons; one is that I want to show the diversity of tribal nations living in Los Angeles, and secondly,  to show the passion and collective connection we have as Indigenous women to our tribal history.

The poem is read by 12 Native women living in Los Angeles whose strong voices embody empowerment : Nanabah Hill, (Navajo-Oneida), Diana Terrazas, (Paiute), JaNae Collins, (Dakota-Crow), Xelt’tia Temryss Lane, (Lummi Nation), Viki Eagle, Sicanqu (Lakota-Sioux), Cheyenne Phoenix, (Northern Paiute-Navajo), Stephanie Mushrush, (Washoe Tribe), Hakekta Winyan Jealous Of Him (Lakota), Chrissie Castro, (Navajo), Neyom Friday, (Cheyenne-Arapaho and Mskoke Creek), Vivian Garcia, (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma), and Deja Jones, (Eastern Shoshone).

Metal Road (Sarah del Seronde, 2016)Steel workers

For decades, thousands of Navajos worked the railroads maintaining the trans-continental network. Like the highly skilled Mohawk ironworkers, this connection of aboriginal people leaving their homeland to work conveys a dedication to their livelihood. Metal Road enters the world of Navajo families amid history of railroad work by the 9001 Heavy Steel Gang. Replacing rails on more than 64,000 miles of track, the unknown journey of the Navajo trackmen in the United States reveals an invisible group of workers striving to earn retirement benefits and inspires us to rethink the American work ethic.

About our Filmmakers:

LaRonn Katchia and Issac Trimball

Kalvin Hartwig

Sarah del Seronde

 

Pamela J. Peters (Diné Nation)88fc07385371ef536654f9c9cea0fa4d

Pamela J. Peters is an Indigenous multimedia documentarian born and raised on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. She has a BA in American Indian Studies and Film Television from UCLA.

Pamela’s work presents personal stories of contemporary urban Indians in photography and film.  She pushes viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native Americans in mass media.   Her multimedia work reflects the perseverance of American Indian cultural identities today. She produces living portraits of American Indians reflected through an indigenous aesthetic lens. Pamela works as a culture consultant and native talent referral for many networks such as: FX, Comedy Central, HBO and MTV. She has also professionally produced five award winning films for the Southern California Indian Center’s InterTribal Entertainment multimedia program, co-created film workshops for Native youth, produced PSA’s for Fox Studio’s American Indian Summer Institute program, and co-hosted “Bringing the Circle Together,” a monthly showcase of Indigenous documentaries at the Japanese American National Museum National Center for Preservation of Democracy Tateuchi Forum in Los Angeles.

 

 

Location and Time:

University of St. Thomas
O’Shaughnessy Educational Center Auditorium
(located on Cleveland Ave and Portland Ave)
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105
St. Thomas Campus Map
3:30-5:00

Thank you to our sponsors:
Augsburg College
American Indian Studies Department
American Culture and Difference Program, University of St. Thomas
Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota

 

NATIVE AMERICAN CONVERSATIONS ON LAW ENFORCEMENT, JUSTICE, AND REDEMPTION

March 30, 2018

Join our hosts, Shirley Sneve (Vision Maker Media) and John Gwinn (MIGIZI Communications) for a night of films focused on Native Americans’ experiences with and perspectives on law enforcement, racism, and healing.

 

Vision Maker Media Productions:

Photo of peopleA Conversation with Native Americans on Law Enforcement (Charles Kennedye and Georgiana Lee, 2017)

“A Conversation with Native Americans on Law Enforcement” is a short documentary film with a collage of interviews from Native sons, mothers, fathers, educators, and leaders expressing their thoughts on “the talk”—or lack thereof—in Indian Country from their own experience. The film provides insight from personal experience, giving an overall perspective and impressions from Native Americans interacting with law enforcement today.

The interviews offer the Native American perspective and individual impressions from Native American interactions with law enforcement today.
  • Chandra Walker (Omaha Nation) is a Community Health Educator at the Office of Health Disparities & Health Equity in Lincoln, Nebraska.
  • Jared Long Soldier (Oglala Lakota) lived much of his childhood running into the law. More recently, he has discovered a faith led journey of sobriety that has helped him turn his interest to giving back to other men who are looking for a sober lifestyle.
  • Larry Voegele (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe) is CEO for Health Services Division at Ponca Tribe of Nebraska.
  • Joseph B. Rousseau (Cheyenne River Sioux) is an Administrator within Lincoln Public Schools for the Expelled Student Program and also serves on the Lincoln Public Schools Indian Parent Advisory Committee.

Leo Yankton – A Redemption Story (Edmund Frazer Myer, 2017)

In this short film, Leo Yankton (Oglala Sioux) tells how he changed his life around from having a troubled past and growing up on the Pine Ridge reservation to being an international speaker. Leo contributed in efforts to protect the water on the Standing Rock reservation, and continues to find ways to have a positive impact within Native Country and the rest of the world.

 

Migizi Communications’ First Person Productions (2016):

Failure of Justice (Caitlynn Anoka)Image from Failure of Justice

A look at the current state of police/community relations, especially as it relates to American Indians and other people of color, and how candidate for president Hillary Clinton plans to address these issues if elected.
 

 

 

 

TaPhoto of Protest at Governer's Houseking Action (Brian Bohanan, Tyereh House and Lorenzo Castaway, 2016)

This video looks at several police killings of civilians during 2016, including Philando Castile in St. Paul and Loreal Tsingine in Winslow, AZ. The filmmakers ask people how these tragic incidences can be stopped through a change in legislation and policy.

 

About Our Hosts:

Photo of Shirley SneveShirley Sneve (Sincangu Lakota) is the Executive Director of Vision Maker Media, whose mission is to empower and engage Native People to tell stories.

An enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota, she has been in Nebraska for 10 years. She has served as director of Arts Extension Service in Amherst, Massachusetts, and the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science’s Visual Arts Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Shirley was assistant director for the South Dakota Arts Council, and she was a founder of Northern Plains Tribal Arts Show, the Oyate Trail cultural tourism byway, and the Alliance of Tribal Tourism Advocates. She started her career as a producer for South Dakota Public Broadcasting. She serves on the boards of The Association of American Cultures, the Friends of the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center, the South East Nebraska Native American Coalition, and the Arts Extension Institute. She chairs the board of Native Americans in Philanthropy. Shirley is also a consultant with Creative Community Builders.

 

 

Photo of John Gwinn John Gwinn is Project Coordinator/Media Specialist at MIGIZI Communications.

Binesi Means and Tiana LaPointe are Native filmmakers that work with the First Person Production program at Migizi Communiciations.

First Person Productions is a program of Migizi Communications that consists of multi media production  (film, video, radio) and a New Media Pathway Program to train Native American youth to produce and distribute content via conventional and virtual media. First Person Productions (FPP) provides multi-media production training to approximately 50 Minneapolis Native youth each year.

 

 

Location and Time

Augsburg University
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public

For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 26th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit. For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number.

 

Thank you to our sponsors: Vision Maker Media, MIGIZI Communications, Augsburg University, American Indian Studies Department, American Indian Student Services, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.

Logo for Vision Maker MediaLogo for MIGIZI Communications

 

 

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg University, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place/it flies. falls./]

November 8, 2017

INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place/it flies. falls./]

 

 

INAATE/SE Photo

Adam Khalil and Zack Khalil’s debut film re-imagines an Anishinaabe story, the Seven Fires Prophecy, which both predates and predicts first contact with Europeans. A kaleidoscopic experience blending documentary, narrative, and experimental forms, INAATE/SE/ explores how the prophecy resonates through the generations in their indigenous community on the Michigan/Canadian border. With acute geographic specificity, and grand historical scope, the film fixes its lens between the sacred and the profane to pry open the construction of contemporary indigenous identity.

Adam will be hosting the screening of this film and the discussion that follows.  Come and meet Adam!

 

 

trailer: http://www.inaatese.com/trailer/ website: http://www.inaatese.com/ facebook: facebook.com/inaatese

INAATESE Photo Press:

“The tattered history of the Ojibway people of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is redeemed through the punk-rock humor of a pair of young native filmmakers in “INAATE/SE/.” -The Wall Street Journal

“An artful and brilliant collage, expressing hope, pain, despair, and the trickster humor that is so evocative of its people.” BOMB Magazine

“Stylistically audacious” The Hollywood Reporter

“Formally adventurous but never esoteric, INAATE/SE is an inimitable model for what radical documentary in the 21st century might be”– Screen Slate

“INAATE/SE/ is as lucid a dream of the future as any historical documentary has ever been.” – NonFics

ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

Photo of Adam Shingwak Khalil .jpg

Adam Shingwak Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Adam’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, UnionDocs, e-flux, Maysles Cinema, Microscope Gallery (New York), Museo ExTeresa Arte Actual (Mexico City), Spektrum (Berlin), Trailer Gallery (Sweden), Carnival of eCreativity (Bombay), and Fine Art Film Festival Szolnok (Hungary). Khalil is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2011 he graduated from the Film and Electronic Arts program at Bard College.

Photo of ZackZack Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, currently based in Brooklyn, NY. His work often explores an indigenous worldview and undermines traditional forms of historical authority through the excavation of alternative histories and the use of innovative documentary forms. Zack’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, UnionDocs, e-flux, and Maysles Cinema. He recently completed a B.A. at Bard College in the Film and Electronic Arts Department, and is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar.

Location and Time

Augsburg University
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg University, American Indian Studies Department, American Indian Student Services, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.

For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 26th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit. For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg University, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

Red Power Energy

March 8, 2017

Red Power EnergyFour Corner Generating Power Station, New Mexico. Photo by Lisa D. Olken

Red Power Energy is a documentary film that combines engaging storytelling with in-depth journalism. Told solely from the Native perspective, with a nearly all-Native film crew and all-Native Advisory Council, the film features Western and Great Plains American Indian tribes from North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado. First-person stories illustrate the complex realities of American Indian reservations grappling with how to balance their natural resources with their traditional beliefs. From the historic United Nations Climate Conference to the proliferation of non-Western countries industrializing their economies through fossil fuel production, Red Power Energy offers a rare glimpse into Indian Country while further advancing a deeper understanding of the energy debate. (Official Program Description from Red Power Energy Publicity)

Larry Pourier (Oglala Lakota), one of the director’s of this film, will host the film screening and answer questions after the screening.

 

About our Host

Larry Pourier  LARRY POURIER, Oglala Lakota   Director  (Here is a link to the images he sent from Standing Rock)
Larry T. Pourier has worked in the film, music, and theater industry for over 25 years. His film credits include: Imprint, Skins, Good Meat, Spiral of Fire, and Stone Child. We Shall Remain (PBS), New World (Feature), Dreamkeeper (ABC), Skinwalkers (PBS), Lewis & Clark (IMAX), The Witness (IMAX), Crazy Horse (TNT), Lakota Woman (TNT), Buffalo Soldiers (TNT), Tecumseh (TNT), and Doe Boy (Indie). His latest achievement was to help develop and produce an ongoing Native American public history program for historical Colonial Williamsburg, the first in their history. When not working on a film project he lives in Thunder Valley, on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, Augsburg’s Marginalized Voices in Film and Media, and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.

 

For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 26th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.  For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

The Seventh Fire

 

March 16, 2017  The Seventh Fire

4still_robbasketball_theseventhfireFrom executive producers Terrence Malick, Natalie Portman and Chris Eyre comes a fascinating new documentary by Jack Pettibone Riccobono, The Seventh Fire.

Rob’s 37-year story spans 39 foster homes, five trips to prison, and a near lifelong affiliation with the Native Gangster Disciples, a criminal gang that he has helped bring to Pine Point—also known as “P-Town”—a small Native village in northern Minnesota on the White Earth Indian Reservation. Rob is more than a gangster with a long rap sheet; he is also a loving father to his daughter Persephone, and a wickedly smart and sensitive writer who aspires to literary greatness. Late in the film, the solitude and sobriety of prison life lead to Rob’s cultural awakening: he becomes the leader of the prison’s Native Culture Group and begins writing a novel about his childhood, bringing a lyrical perspective to his painful and complicated story.

On the cusp of his eighteenth birthday, Kevin finds himself at a different sort of crossroads; he has the opportunity to reconnect with traditional Ojibwe ways, but continues to be pulled towards the criminal lifestyle of his mentor. Early one morning, Kevin’s father describes to his son the significance of their clan: “Wolf clan means that’s the animal we represent. Power. Intelligence. Endurance. A wolf can be passionate and it can be very destructive.” At one point in the film we see Rob riding a motorcycle on the open road, a warrior choker necklace strapped proudly around his throat, knocking against the gang tattoo on his chest. At another moment we find Kevin trying to honor both his tribe and his gang affiliation by getting a wolf clan tattoo of his own.

Together the lives of Rob and Kevin present a devastating counter-myth to textbook notions of the American dream, and they force us to confront the modern-day ramifications of what are still the most overlooked aspects of American history.

To see the trailer visit: http://www.filmmovement.com/nontheatrical/index.asp?MerchandiseID=478

 

 About Jack Pettibone Riccobonodirector2_jack_pettibone_riccobono_web_theseventhfire1

Jack Pettibone Riccobono (Director, Producer, Writer, DP) has produced and directed a wide range of work across the five boroughs of his native New York City and around the world, from Moscow to Shanghai to Freetown. His narrative short KILLER premiered at New Directors / New Films and won Best Short at the Nantucket Film Festival. His short documentary THE SACRED FOOD, shot on the same reservation as THE SEVENTH FIRE, premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival.  Jack received a Discovery Award from the Hollywood Film Festival for his directing work.

A graduate of Harvard’s VES Film Production Program and Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School, his films have been screened at festivals around the world and at venues including Documenta Madrid, the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of the American Indian, the American University in Rome, and at The White House as part of a special event addressing the most pressing criminal justice issues facing Indian Country residents today. In 2008, Jack launched the production company All Rites Reserved, dedicated to producing films with global reach that push visual and conceptual boundaries. In 2014, Jack joined the directing roster of The Amoveo Company. (The Seventh Fire press kit).

The genesis of THE SEVENTH FIRE, according to Jack Pettibone Riccobono
500 years before the coming of the white man to America, the Ojibwe Tribe, or Anishinaabe as they call themselves, received a prophecy that foretold a period of darkness and cultural destruction. It also spoke of a time when the youngest generation of Ojibwe would have a choice to return to traditional ways and lead a rebirth of their nation. Many Ojibwe believe that the moment of choice has arrived -the time of the Seventh Fire. This prophecy is where the film takes its name. In America and much of the world, there is a romanticized vision of the American Indian, and a total blind spot about the history of Native Americans and the injustices this community continues to suffer to this day. It is rare to see any contemporary images of Native life in the mainstream media or to see past the harsh statistics that tell only part of the story. My goal in making this film was to craft an immersive, character-driven work of cinema that would reveal the stories of Rob and Kevin with intimacy, empathy, and urgency, and place their personal journeys in the larger context of an unjust history that America has yet to reckon with.  (http://www.filmmovement.com/downloads/press/The%20Seventh%20Fire%20Press%20Kit(1).pdf)

Location and Time

The University of St. Thomas
John Roach Center auditorium (JRC 126), which is located on the corner of Summit and Cleveland Avenues.
Building 2 on St. Thomas Campus Map
Screening: 1:30-3:10
This event is free to the public

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, American Culture and Difference Program at the University of St. Thomas, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, Augsburg’s Marginalized Voices in Film and Media, and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.

 

Jingle Dress (William Eigen, 2014)

September 21, 2016

Jingle Dress (William Eigen, 2014)

The Augsburg Native American Film Series is happy to co-sponsor with Augsburg’s Student groups –AISA (Augsburg Indigenous Student Association) and Marginalized Voices in Film and Media–this free film screening on campus.   This feature length film is set and filmed in Minnesota and William Eigen will be there to talk with you about the film!

Desert Storm veteran John Red Elk gets word from his relatives that his long lost Uncle Norton is dead and vows to go down to the big city to find out what really happened to him. At its heart ‘The Jingle Dress’ is an immigrant story of an Ojibwe family that moves from the rural setting of a  Reservation in northern Minnesota down to the heart of the urban ‘hood’ of Minneapolis. We follow the Red Elk family as they discover this new culture and through their experiences and unvarnished perspective we are able to view our own culture with fresh eyes, as well as gain insight into their ancient, indigenous society.
-Bill Eigen

 

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Conversation with Filmmaker and Reception 3:45
Screening begins at 4:00

This event is free to the public

For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number.

 

 

NDNZ in the City

November 2

NDNZ in the City: Multi-media Narratives of American Indian Culture in the Heart of Los Angeles, California 

Join us for an evening of talk, short films, photographs, and personal stories from Indigenous multimedia documentarian, Pamela Peters (Navajo).  The evening’s event will showcase Peter’s newest film Legacy of Exiled NDNZ and multimedia presentation Real NDNZ re-take Hollywood.  Pamela’s work stands against prevalent stereotypes of American Indians in popular culture by pushing viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native American in mass media.

 

ExiledWelcome copy Legacy of Exiled NDNZ discusses the historical US policies of relocation of Indians to urban establishment and the legacy it has created to today. It provides a narrative of seven native adults currently living in Los Angeles. Shot in a neorealist visual aesthetic reminiscent of Kent Mackenzie’s 1961 film, The Exiles, we catch a glimpse of the group of urban Indians living their hopes and dreams in the city.

Real NDNZ re-take Hollywood showcases native adults in photographs to disrupt and decolonize clichéd portrayals of Native actors. The series “re-takes” and creates classic, iconic portraits of PamelaJ_Peters_030(1)movies stars of yesteryears by replacing those past film icons with contemporary Native American actors.  The project shows real Indian actors in the elegant clothes and iconic poses of James Dean, Audrey Hepburn, Tony Curtis and others from the classic period of Hollywood films – rather than in the buckskin, feathers, and painted faces featured in most Hollywood films of Indians.


 

About Pamela Peters  88fc07385371ef536654f9c9cea0fa4d

Pamela J. Peters is an Indigenous multimedia documentarian born and raised on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. Her current multimedia project, Legacy of Exiled NDNZ began as a short film that has expanded into a full-length documentary along with an ongoing multimedia component about the history of American Indians living in Los Angeles. To date, she has spoken at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, UCLA, California State Polytechnic University, Pitzer College, Cal Arts, UC-San Diego, UC-Riverside, UC-Irvine, Occidental College, Northwestern University and University of Oregon.

Her work presents personal stories of contemporary urban Indians in photography and film to commemorate the legacy of the Indian Relocation program, a U.S. federal program enacted to assimilate American Indians in the 1950s. Her short film Legacy of Exiled NDNZ premiered at the Los Angeles Short Fest, and continues to be screened at short film festivals nationally and internationally. Legacy of Exiled NDNZ photo essay was exhibited at 118 Winston Street Gallery, and Venice Arts Gallery as part of the Summer Juried Exhibition: “Ecotone| Boundaries, Tensions, Integrations.”

Her mission is to combat the idea of the static, stereotypical Indian portrayed so pervasively in all media. She wants people to know that Indians are many nations with many stories. Pamela’s portraits stand against prevalent stereotypes of American Indians in popular culture. Having grown up on the reservation in Arizona her experience of Indian life was not reflected in popular culture. She made it her dream to produce authentic portraits and stories of the persistence of Indian life in contemporary contexts.  As a storyteller, she develops photographic narratives that illustrate the real stories of American Indians within their communities. Her goal is to represent the beauty and complexity of their lives in their personal settings, and to humanize them in a way rarely done in mass media. Through her work, she intends to re-appropriate harmful stereotypes.
Pamela’s multimedia work reflects the perseverance of American Indian cultural identities today. She produces living portraits of American Indians reflected through an indigenous aesthetic lens. Pamela works as a culture consultant and native talent referral for many networks such as: FX, Comedy Central, HBO and MTV. She has also professionally produced five award winning films for the Southern California Indian Center’s InterTribal Entertainment multimedia program, co-created film workshops for Native youth, produced PSA’s for Fox Studio’s American Indian Summer Institute program, and co-hosted “Bringing the Circle Together,” a monthly showcase of Indigenous documentaries at the Japanese American National Museum National Center for Preservation of Democracy Tateuchi Forum in Los Angeles.

Pamela’s work pushes viewers to critically analyze the psychological and historical structures of Native Americans in mass media. Pamela has a BA in American Indian Studies and Film Television from UCLA.

Location and Time

Augsburg College
Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South
Reception 6:15-6:45
Screening begins at 7:00
Discussion with filmmakers follows
This event is free to the public

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, Augsburg’s Marginalized Voices in Film and Media, and the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota.

For parking permits contact M. Elise Marubbio at marubbio@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number.

For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/. You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454

March Point

April  21, 2016

250x353edu_march_pointMARCH POINT filmmakers Tracy Rector and Annie Silverstein bring together filmmaking and alternative education through their collaboration with the three young Native Americans. The film assignment sends the boys down a path of historical investigation. Like many young people, Travis, Nick and Cody didn’t know much about their ancestors’ history. By interviewing tribal elders, they learn that most of their land was taken away by the federal government in the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855, leaving the Swinomish with basic health care, some fishing rights and a small reservation. President Ulysses S. Grant took more land in 1870, a move the tribe considers illegal.

The boys learn that the people now known as the Swinomish flourished on the bounty of the coast of the Pacific Northwest for thousands of years. Clams, crabs and fish were plentiful, and as the tribal saying goes, “When the tide’s out, the table’s set.” But when in the 1950s, Shell Oil built two refineries on land once owned by the tribe, chemicals made their way into the water, tainting the seafood and shellfish that the Swinomish eat daily. And just as the toxins in the water seeped into the food, poverty, drugs and alcohol have seeped into the lives of the families who live there. Ambivalent environmental ambassadors at the onset of the filmmaking venture, the boys awaken to the destruction these refineries have wrought in their communities. Grappling with their assignment through humor, sarcasm and a candid self-knowledge, they begin to experience the need to understand and tell their own stories and to grasp the power of this process to change their lives and give back to their community. MARCH POINT follows the boys’ journey on their path from childhood to adulthood as they come to understand themselves, their tribe and the environmental threat to their people.

Location and Time:
University of St. Thomas
John Roach Center auditorium (JRC 126), which is located on the corner of Summit and Cleveland Avenues.
Building 2 on St. Thomas Campus Map
3:30-5:00

Thank you to our sponsors:
Augsburg College
American Indian Studies Department
American Culture and Difference Program, University of St. Thomas
Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota

Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making us Sick?

February 15, 2016

Bad Sugar

Bad Sugar, episode four of the seven part PBS’ series  Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?, focuses on the reasons for high diabetes rates in the Pima and Tohono O’odham of southern Arizona and other Native American peoples.

The Pima and Tohono O’odham Indians of southern Arizona have arguably the highest diabetes rates in the world – half of all adults are afflicted. But a century ago, diabetes was virtually unknown here. Researchers have poked and prodded the Pima for decades in search of a biological – or more recently, genetic – explanation for their high rates of disease. Meanwhile, medical-only interventions have failed to stem the rising tide not just among Native Americans, but globally.

What happened to the health of the Pima? During the 20th century, the diversion of river water to upstream white settlements disrupted the Pima’s agricultural economy and customary ways. Local tribes were plunged into poverty and became dependent on the U.S. government. Healthy traditional foods like tepary beans, cholla buds, and wild game were replaced by surplus commodities like white flour, lard, processed cheese and canned foods – a diabetic’s nightmare. A sense of “futurelessness” took hold, and so did diabetes.

According to Dr. Don Warne, a trained physician and traditional Lakota healer who works with the Pima, health problems like diabetes begin long before people get to the clinic or the hospital. While obesity and diet are risk factors, so is poverty. People in the lowest income brackets are at least twice as likely to become diabetic as those in the highest. For the O’odham and other Native Americans, the stress of living in poverty is compounded by a history of cultural, economic and physical loss, which researchers believe magnifies its impact on health.

Attorney Rod Lewis has spent the last several decades fighting to restore his tribe’s water rights. In 2004 he helped negotiate the largest water settlement in Arizona history, which not only guaranteed the return of water but provided crucial funds to build roads, dams and other infrastructure. Now the Pima are beginning to farm again. Leaders are cautiously optimistic that community empowerment, along with sustainable and culturally appropriate development can help restore prosperity, hope, and health.  (http://www.unnaturalcauses.org/episode_descriptions.php?page=4)

About our Presenter:

Donald Warne, (Oglala Lakota) MD, MPH is Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Health in the College of Health Professions at North Dakota State University, and he is the Senior Policy Advisor to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board.  Dr. Warne is a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe from Pine Ridge, SD and comes from a long line of traditional healers and medicine men.  He received his MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and his MPH from Harvard School of Public Health.

Professional activities include:

  • Member, National Board of Directors, American Cancer Society
  • Member, Minority Affairs Section and Association of American Indian Physicians Representative to the American Medical Association
  • Member, Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, US Department of Health and Human Services
  • Member, Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Member, National Institutional Review Board, Indian Health Service

Location and Time

Augsburg College

Reception in Sverdrup Hall, Main Lobby 5:00-6:00
Screening begins at 6:00 in Science Hall 123
Discussion with Dr. Warne follows
This event is free to the public

 

Thank you to our sponsors: Augsburg College, American Indian Studies Department, The Batalden Seminar in Applied Ethics, the Institute for Global Studies at the University of Minnesota,

 

For parking permits contact Christina Erickson at ericksoc@augsburg.edu. Permits are limited in number. For parking directions visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/about/map/.  You will be parking in Lot L off of 35th between Riverside and Butler Pl. You will need a parking permit.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to the Augsburg Native American Film Series or this project, please send your checks to:

Augsburg Native American Film Series
Augsburg College, CB 115
2011 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454