Crime Prevention

Emergency Contact Information

To report a fire, medical emergency, or crime in progress, dial x7777 from any campus phone.

For non-emergency calls, dial x1717 on campus, or 612-330-1717 from off campus.

Crime Prevention is everyone’s responsibility.  Only by working together can we keep Augsburg the safe campus that it is.

Important Information

The Augsburg College Public Safety Department has trained officers available to answer your questions about Crime Prevention. To inquire about your specific needs, or schedule a Crime Prevention Seminar for your group, you can call the Department at x1717 from anywhere on campus, or 330-1717 from off campus.

You are also welcome to send email to security@augsburg.edu

Special Thanks to the University of California-Northridge Police Department for assistance on this section.


Residence Hall Tips

Theft, usually a crime of opportunity, is by far the most common crime in residence halls. Thefts are most often committed by persons you or your roommates allow into your residence.

Burglary (entering your residence with the intent to commit a crime), is also a problem but can usually be prevented by taking simple precautions.

Last, but most important, is your personal safety. The chances of physical attack or rape can be greatly reduced by being cautious and alert.

DO:

  • Leave valuables, particularly jewelry, at home if it is not necessary to have them at your campus residence.
  • Keep your door locked even when you’re at home. It’s easy for others to enter your residence without you knowing, particularly if you’re in a back room or if your stereo or television is playing.
  • Call the Security Department to report suspicious persons.
  • Record the make, model, and serial number of valuables and keep the records in a safe place.
  • Engrave your property with your driver license number.
  • Report lost keys to your residence to housing staff immediately.
  • Check the area for suspicious persons before walking to or exiting your vehicle.
  • Discuss these crime prevention tips with your roommates and floormates.
  • Report crimes to the Security Department as soon as possible.

DO NOT:

  • Allow strangers or hold large gatherings in your residence. It is easy for someone to steal small items without being noticed.
  • Prop open exterior building doors. You are jeopardizing other’s safety, as well as your own.
  • Let strangers into the buildings.

Tips for Bicycle Owners

Preventing Bike Theft

Bicycle theft is an ongoing problem at this and every college. Most bicycle thefts can be prevented by taking simple precautions. You can also substantially increase the chances of recovering your bicycle should it be stolen.

Register Your Bike!

Of over 15,000 bicycles stolen in the U.S. every day, only 2-5% are ever returned to their owners. One of the best ways to ensure your bike is recovered is to have it registered. You can register your bike with the City of Minneapolis.

Securing your Bike

Securing Your Bike Using a Cable Lock or Chain

  • Use a cable or chain at least 3/8″ in diameter.
  • Use a key lock with a 3/8″ hardened shackle with heel and toe locking.
  • Pull up all slack in the cable or chain and make sure the lock is as high off the ground as possible.

Securing Your Bike Using a “U”-type lock

  1. Bike with quick release wheels- release the front wheel and include this with the rear wheel and frame.
  2. Bike without quick release wheels- secure the lock through both tire and frame.

DO:

  • Secure to a bicycle rack. College regulations do not allow bicycles in campus buildings or secured to trees, signposts, hand railings, etc. Contact Buildings & Grounds for more information regarding this policy.
  • Record make, model, and serial number and keep in a safe place.
  • Inscribe your driver license number on the frame.
  • Report your stolen bicycle to the security department as soon as possible.
  • Report suspicious persons observed near bicycle racks.
  • Use authorized bike racks on campus. Off campus, secure your bike in a frequently travelled, well-lit area.

DO NOT:

  • Leave your unlocked bicycle unattended “just for a minute.”
  • Use cable or chain lock, no matter how large, as they are easily defeated with bolt cutters.
  • Secure to chain link fencing or other objects significantly weaker in strength than your lock.

Preventing Theft

Theft is by far the most common crime on college campuses. Most thefts are crimes of opportunity and can be prevented by taking simple precautions.

DO:

  • Keep valuables with you at all times or leave them at home.
  • Record the make, model, and serial numbers of all valuables and keep the records in a safe place.
  • Engrave your property with your driver license or some other identification number.
  • Report stolen property to the Security Department as soon as possible.

DO NOT:

  • Leave textbooks unattended, particularly toward the end of a semester. It is common for thieves to sell stolen textbooks back to the stores.
  • Leave credit cards, checks, or other valuables when you “check your bag” in the bookstore while shopping.
  • Leave your bookbag unattended in classrooms, library, study lounges, etc.
  • Carry valubles such as your wallet, jewlery, or credit cards in your bookbag.

Personal Safety Tips

 

DO:

  • Use the “Buddy System.” Walk in groups, if possible, or use the Escort Service.
  • Stay in populated areas and avoid “short cuts” through deserted places, alleys, or bushes.
  • Know the location of emergency call boxes and courtesy phones on campus.
  • Park in well-lit areas as close to your destination as possible.
  • Let a family member, friend or roommate know who you are with, where you will be, and when you will return. Leave an address and phone number if possible.

DO NOT:

  • Hitchhike or pick up hitchhikers.
  • Jog alone or in secluded areas. Ask one or more friends to jog with you.
  • “Flash” large amounts of money or expensive jewelry.

If You Feel Threatened:

  • If you are being followed by a suspicious person, go quickly to a well-lit area and/or group of people.
  • If you feel you are in danger or are approached suddenly, yell “Fire!” or “Help, Police!” and scream as loud as you can. Many people have avoided or escaped harm simply by screaming.
  • If someone follows you into your driveway, stay in your car with the windows shut and the doors locked. Honk your horn to get the attention of neighbors and scare off the other driver.
  • If a car approaches you while you are on foot and you feel threatened, scream and run in the opposite direction from which the car is going.

Preventing Sexual Assault

If you or a friend has been Sexually Assaulted:

Rape can be terrifying and traumatic. After a rape, it’s not uncommon to feel fearful, confused, guilty, ashamed, or isolated. You do not have to deal with these feelings alone. There are many concerned people at Augsburg College and in the community to help you.

For Immediate Help:

  • Get to a safe place. Take care of yourself first.
  • Call a friend, family member, counselor on-call, resident assistant or victim advocate for support.
  • Call the Security Department, who will transport you to the hospital whether or not you choose to report the incident. (For an on-campus assault, call Augsburg Security at x1717. For an off-campus assault, call your local police department at 911.) You may request a woman officer if that is your preference.
  • Try to fight the urge to shower, bathe, douche, change clothes, comb your hair, or straighten up the area. You will destroy evidence you may need.

Campus and Community Support Services

On-Campus:

Augsburg College Security Dept., x1717 (330-1717) Campus Pastor, x1732 (330-1732) Campus Counselors, x1160 (330-1160)

Off-Campus:

Police, 911 Sexual Violence Center, 824-5555 Rape and Sexual Assault Center, 825-4357

Facts About Campus Sexual Assault

According to a 1993 survey of 6,000 college students:

  • One out of four college females reported being victims of rape or attempted rape during preceding year
  • 90% of rapes go unreported
  • 50% of males believe women say “no” when they actually mean “yes”

    women need to say “no” an average of three times before they are believed

  • 30% of male students continued sexual advances after partner said “no” and one out of every six admitted forcing sexual contact

Acquaintance/Date Rape is a serious violation of the code of student conduct. The act will be handled as a campus disciplinary matter resulting in possible dismissal.

Sexual assault is a serious crime. Victims are strongly encouraged to report the crime to the local police.

Ways for Men to Avoid Circumstances Which Might Lead to Sexual Assault:

  • Understand your sexual desires and limits. You are responsible for our actions as an individual and as a member of a group. Be aware of and resist social pressure.
  • Being turned down when you ask for sexual relations is not a rejection of you personally. A woman who says “no” to sexual relations is not necessarily rejecting you; she is expressing her unwillingness to participate in a specific act at a specific time.
  • Accept the woman’s decision. “No” means “no.” Don’t read in other meanings. Don’t continue after the woman says “no.”
  • Don’t assume that just because a woman flirts or dresses in a manner which you consider sexy that she wants to engage in sexual activity.
  • Don’t assume that previous permission for sexual activity applies to the current situation.
  • Avoid excessive use of alcohol and drugs. Alcohol and drugs interfere with clear thinking and effective communication.

Ways for Women to Avoid Circumstances Which Might Lead to Sexual Assault:

  • Understand your sexual desires and limits. Believe in your right to set those limits. If you are not sure, stop.
  • Communicate your limits clearly. If someone starts to offend you, tell him so, firmly and promptly. Polite approaches might be misunderstood or ignored.
  • Say “no” when you mean “no.”
  • Be assertive; passivity might be interpreted as permission. Be direct and firm with someone who is pressuring you sexually.
  • Pay attention to what is happening around you. If you feel threatened, don’t be embarrassed to ask for help or to leave.
  • Trust your intuition. If you feel you are being pressured into unwanted sexual relations, don’t hesitate to express your unwillingness, even if it might appear rude.
  • Avoid excessive use of alcohol and drugs. Alcohol and drugs interfere with clear thinking, effective communication, and your ability to respond in your own best interest.

Car Tips

Theft From Auto is the theft of something from inside a vehicle, such as the stereo. The theft of a part, such as a hood ornament or hubcap, is also considered theft from auto.

Auto Theft is when an entire car is stolen. Auto theft is on the rise nationwide.

Car Jacking is the theft of an auto by force. This crime, while highly publicized, is less common than auto theft.

DO:

  • Always roll up windows, close the sunroof and lock your doors before leaving your vehicle.
  • Whenever possible, bring valuables with you once you have parked your car. If you can’t bring them with you, lock all valuables in the trunk and out of sight, whenever your vehicle is parked.
  • Make sure you have plenty of gas and windshield washer fluid. Ensure your tires have plenty of air and your spare tire and jack are serviceable.
  • Record the make, model, and license number of your car and keep the records in a safe place.
  • Park your car in a well-lit area, as close to your destination as possible.
  • When returning to your vehicle, keep your keys in hand while walking with confidence and purpose.
  • Report any suspicious activity to Augsburg’s Department of Public Safety by calling 612-330-1717 from an off-campus phone or 1717 from an on-campus phone.
  • Trust your instincts. If you do not feel comfortable, or if you have any concerns for your safety, call Augsburg Public Safety for an escort.

DO NOT:

  • Leave cash, credit cards, auto registration or other important papers in plain view or in the glove compartment.
  • Leave valuables such as notebook computers, cell phones or MP3 players in your car.
  • Take “short-cuts” through dark or unfamiliar areas.