Hear Professor McIntosh, Professor Pippert, and Coach Peyton in New Podcast Episodes

Augsburg University is launching a new 18 episode podcast called The Augsburg Podcast featuring voices of Augsburg University faculty and staff. We hope this is one way you can get to know the people who educate our students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. Episodes of The Augsburg Podcast will be released periodically during the summer of 2018. Subscribe to the RSS feed or on iTunes.

 

Episode 4: Marc McIntosh: From Wall Street to Cedar-Riverside

Marc McIntosh, Professor of Finance, views finance as an ethical, humane tool for improving the public good. He works to promote financial literacy and equip his students and community with the means to create positive change through responsible, community-focused financial understanding.

 

Episode 5: Tim Pippert: Empathetic Learning

Tim Pippert, Professor of Sociology and Director for the Center for Teaching and Learning, has dedicated many years to researching inequality and understanding how and why such disparities in wealth, opportunity, and access exist in our communities. In these stories, Tim reflect on inequalities found very close to home — and how sometimes the smallest kindnesses can make the greatest difference.

 

Episode 6: Meghan Peyton: Coaching the Spirit

Meghan Peyton, Cross Country Head Coach and Track & Field Assistant Coach, trains Augsburg’s runners with equal parts bold vision, strong leadership, and personal connection.

 

 

Augsburg Launches new Podcast Featuring Faculty and Staff

Augsburg University is launching a new 18 episode podcast called The Augsburg Podcast featuring voices of Augsburg University faculty and staff. We hope this is one way you can get to know the people who educate our students to be informed citizens, thoughtful stewards, critical thinkers, and responsible leaders. Episodes of The Augsburg Podcast will be released periodically during the summer of 2018. Subscribe to the RSS feed or on iTunes.

 

Episode 1: Katie Clark: A Passion for Progress

Katie Clark, Assistant Professor of Nursing and Director of Augsburg Central Health Commons, looks back on her own transformative education in healthcare and how her experience informs a transcultural nursing emphasis in her courses.

 

 

Episode 2: Reinaldo Moya: Composing the Future

 

Reinaldo Moya, Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition, empowers his students to trust in their own creative potential and dig deep into musical discovery.

 

 

Episode 3: Dale Pederson: Science and Faith

For Dale Pederson, associate professor of biology, the two terms [OR science and religion] are not mutually exclusive standpoints, but rather sympathetic traditions that can coexist in harmony — each offering their own rich and valid perspective on our human experience.

 

An Auggie Love Story

 

Beth Florence ’08 was an Augsburg golden girl, from a family filled with Auggies, with a glowing reputation as both a campus leader and a hard worker. Florence, a Spanish major, made such an impact in her time at Augsburg, she received the Marina Christensen Justice Award for her civic engagement when she graduated. Florence later attended the Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies.  She is currently employed at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland.

Aaron Wells ’08 was recognized around campus for being incredibly funny.  In addition to writing many hard-hitting stories for The Echo, he also penned the popular, joke, horoscopes which caught the eye of Florence (“I just thought they were hilarious”).  Wells balanced his love of fun, by working hard and completing his Political Science degree in 2008.

He later attended Washington and Lee School of Law and is a partner at STG, a policy and public affairs consulting firm.

Wells and Florence were introduced eventually through a mutual friend and developed their own friendship at Augsburg. This friendship eventually blossomed Beth and Aaron engagedinto a romantic relationship in 2013.

When the time was right, Wells knew the perfect location for the proposal to Florence was the Christensen Center on August 12, 2017.  She said yes! The couple now live together in Washington D.C. and they embody the true spirit of Augsburg both individually and as a couple.

“All we do, we credit to Augsburg,” they agree. “We credit our strong moral and personal compasses to the time we spent at Augsburg. Nothing else measures up to it.” Both Wells and Florence acknowledge that the time and effort they spent searching for perfect jobs stemmed from the emphasis on vocation at Augsburg. They are both in careers that are service focused and continue to serve the community around them.

Augsburg University wishes Wells and Florence all the best for the future, and we are touched that Augsburg University has played such an integral part in their story.

Both Wells and Florence will be attending our exclusive regional alumni event at the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Washington D.C. We invite you to join Augsburg, President Paul C. Pribbenow, members of Augsburg staff and Wells and Florence for this evening of exciting conversation and connections. For more information on this event click here.

 

Augsburg included on list for producing the most 2017-2018 Fulbright students

Augsburg is proud to be included on the list of U.S. colleges and universities that produced the most 2017-2018. Fulbright U.S. Students recently announced by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program. Top-producing institutions are highlighted annually in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Four students from Augsburg received Fulbright awards for the academic year 2017-2018: Dustin Parks (Peru – Research Grant), Hannah Schmit (Czech Republic – English Teaching Assistantship), Hannah Frey (South Korea – English Teaching Assistantship), and Rachel Frantz (Malaysia – English Teaching Assistantship). You can read more about them on URGO’s blog (http://www.augsburg.edu/urgo/2017/06/26/meet-the-2017-2018-fulbright-scholars/).

The Fulbright Program provides participants—chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential — with the opportunity to exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns. Over 1,900 U.S. students, artists and young professionals are offered Fulbright Program grants to study, teach English, and conduct research abroad each year. The Fulbright U.S. Student Program operates in over 140 countries throughout the world.

The Mutuality of Internship

One of the two presentations led by Fishbowl Solutions reps on April 5 (from left: Jake Ferm, Carmen Williams, Noah Bodner, and Amy Bowar Mellinger).
One of the two presentations led by Fishbowl Solutions reps on April 5 (from left: Jake Ferm, Carmen Williams, Noah Bodner, and Amy Bowar Mellinger).

Student questions following presentations by reps from Fishbowl Solutions yielded some interesting conversation in Professor Larry Crockett’s computer science class, April 5. For example, “As a software consultant, how often do you feel the need to go online to find answers to your own software challenges?”

The answer from Fishbowl’s Jake Ferm ’12 may have been somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but then again, maybe not: “Every ten minutes.”

Fishbowl Solutions, a Twin Cities-based software company, creates packaged software and develops custom technology solutions using the latest Oracle, Google, Mindbreeze, and PTC technologies. The company of 40+ employees, founded in 1999, has offices in both the U.S. and the U.K., and serves an international clientele.

The Fishbowl reps, invited to visit two sections of Crockett’s CSC/PHI 385 class (Formal Logic and Theory of Computation), included Noah Bodner (Recruiting), and three Auggies: Amy Bowar Mellinger ’97 (Fishbowl’s Director of Services), Jake Ferm ’12 (Software Consultant), and Carmen (Crockett) Williams MBA ’12 (Account Executive, Sales).

After the Fishbowl guests described the nature of their company and work, as well as their take on various current trends in technology, students raised numerous questions. The resulting interaction provided good advice on many issues, such as these comments on interviewing from Williams: (1) Prepare wisely for an interview (always plan on a glitch; arrive ten minutes early); (2) Think ahead about what questions to ask the interviewer (remember, you’re interviewing the company as much as they’re interviewing you); and (3) Ask what further education and training the prospective employer is willing to provide.

A photo of (from left) Jake Ferm, Larry Crockett, Carmen Williams, Amy Bowar Mellinger
(from left) Jake Ferm, Larry Crockett, Carmen Williams, Amy Bowar Mellinger

Mellinger stressed the importance of keeping an open mind when deciding on an employer, giving attention to the importance of matching one’s work-style with the anticipated projects. For example, she recalled working on one seven-year project at an earlier job, which, she said, may not have been as appealing to someone who enjoys working on a variety of projects or technologies.

Fishbowl reps emphasized how valuable a liberal arts education is in their work, since the broad scope of the classes they took continues to provide flexibility and greater opportunity in their work, and in the marketplace in general.

The Fishbowl visit to Augsburg was an excellent opportunity for students who are eagerly seeking internships or employment to connect with a company that is just as eager to find talented interns and employees. As Bodner explained, given the current Twin Cities unemployment rate in the area of computer science (less than 1%), students are in a strong position to find several appealing opportunities, and their thoughtful preparation for interviews can make an offer much more likely. A look at the website for Fishbowl Solutions says, “We’re looking for innovators with a passion for technology and learning to fill a variety of technical and non-technical roles.”

Mellinger, who worked for many years as a consultant prior to taking on her leadership role at Fishbowl Solutions, was surprised to discover recently that her colleague at Fishbowl, Williams, is the daughter of Crockett, who had taught two of her classes at Augsburg.

Larry Crockett with former student Amy Bowar Mellinger
Larry Crockett with former student Amy Bowar Mellinger

In the April 5 forum, about 50 students had a chance to interact with former students to compare and contrast pre-graduation education with in-field work experience, and to consider how one’s education must continue in the workplace. Ferm stressed that, especially as a software consultant, he is learning new things daily—online and in person—as he encounters new challenges that push him to continue educating himself. And when new interns come on board, they learn from the staff’s collective experience, and staff pick up new things from the interns. Nothing like a win-win situation!

The April 5 event was also an opportunity for three Auggie alums to take in the new Hagfors CSBR facility; they left deeply impressed.

—by Cheryl Crockett ’89

Land of 10,000 Loves: A History of Queer Minnesota

A portrait of Stewart Van Cleve
Stewart Van Cleve

Stewart Van Cleve is a librarian and digital archivist at Augsburg University’s Lindell Library, where he is responsible for Augsburg’s Digital Archives (library.augsburg.edu/archives). His passion for archiving began while studying toward a degree in Urban Studies at the University of Minnesota when he had a student position working with the renowned Tretter Collection in GLBT Studies. The Tretter Collection is a vast collection of books, photographs, films, and other historical artifacts that Van Cleve calls “one of the most comprehensive accounts of international queer history in the world.” After receiving his master’s in urban studies from Portland State University, Van Cleve decided to pursue a master’s degree in library and information science at St. Catherine University, in St. Paul.

In 2012, Van Cleve published his book, Land of 10,000 Loves: A History of Queer Minnesota, a wide-ranging illustrated history of queer life in Minnesota. The book contains more than 120 historical essays exploring the earliest evidence of queer life in Minnesota before the Second World War—from Oscar Wilde’s visit to Minnesota, riverfront vice districts, protest and parade sites, bars, 1970s collectives, institutions, public spaces, and private homes. This rich history is illustrated in more than 130 examples, including images of annual “pride guides,” a number of archival photographs, and advertisements from local queer bars.

Having worked at Augsburg for nearly a year, Van Cleve says he loves the “student-centric” nature of the University. On Thursday, April 5, he will be joining the Augsburg Alumni office at its Auggies in the City: Kinky Boots, pre-theater event to discuss his book, and to provide more details on the history of queer life in Minnesota.

For more information on Augsburg alumni events please visit www.augsburg.edu/alumni/events.

 

Auggie Alumnus Named to Florida High Tech Corridor’s 2018 “Faces of Technology”

Amanda Stramer ’12

Amanda Stramer ‘12 was named recently to the Florida High Tech Corridor’s 2018 “Faces of Technology,” which represents more than 252,000 scientists and technologists. Stramer earned this distinction through her innovative work in the development and commercialization of cancer immunotherapies.

For three years, Stramer has worked at Iovance Biotherapeutics in Tampa, FL. Currently a process development associate scientist, she works to develop immuno-oncology therapies, called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), to fight aggressive cancers.

Stramer says she chose to study at Augsburg because it was the most diverse private school in Minnesota*, and was small enough to provide for enhanced learning that can result from significant relationships with professors and classmates alike. Stramer graduated with a BS in Biology and Philosophy and was a lead volunteer at the Campus Kitchen. She has found that she can thrive in a small and intimate work environment, such as the one at Iovance Biotherapeutics, thanks to the study habits she developed at Augsburg.

Within a week of graduating from Augsburg, Stramer was offered a job. She immediately moved to Florida, where she started her career as a microbiologist at a small biotech company in Sarasota.

When asked if she could offer any advice to current Auggies, Stramer said, “Although there is always talk about academic careers following STEM programs, the science industry is so huge and versatile; Auggies should never fear to branch out.”

Stramer is a fantastic example of an Auggie making a difference, and Augsburg can take pride in its diverse alumni base, which includes a wide range of professions and accolades.

Do you know a great Auggie who should be in the spotlight? Let us know by emailing alumni@augsburg.edu.

 

*Augsburg University was the most diverse private school in Minnesota at the time of Stramer’s application.

A Sweetheart of a Sale

Just in time for Valentines Day join the Augsburg Associates for a “Sweetheart of a Sale”  February 13th and 14th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Christensen Center.  With vintage jewelry, homemade candy and one of a kind scarves it will be a great opportunity to pick out unique and special Valentines Day gifts! Love is in the air… see you there!

A photo of the scarves for sale.

Celebrating the Grand Opening of the Hagfors Center

The Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion hosted its grand opening ceremony in style on Saturday, January 27, 2018. Approximately 1000 guests attended the celebration, which included a ribbon-cutting ceremony, remarks by President Pribbenow and Campaign Chair Mike Good ’71, live music, gourmet food stations on each floor, and exclusive access to many parts of the new, four-level building. Some of the Hagfors Center artists who contributed to the Art and Identity campaign also attended and were available to discuss their artwork in detail with attendees. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey joined the celebration and expressed his admiration for the building.

Photograph of President Paul Pribbenow at a podium discussing the opening with a large crowd.
President Paul Pribbenow addressing guests at the grand opening.
Artist Rory Wakemup discussing his art work.
Rory Wakemup discussing his interactive art work with Paul and Nancy Mueller.

The open house began at 3 p.m., and guests were able to visit a multitude of classrooms and laboratories, where they could view the impressive state-of-the-art communications and scientific equipment, and participate in a variety of activities, including liquid nitrogen ice cream tasting, a chemical instrument tour, and a fruit-leather-making demonstration.

 Dr. Peter Agre ’70 was celebrated with placement of a replica of his Nobel Prize award just outside the suspended Hagfors Center Gundale Chapel. A number of other people who have been integral in making the Hagfors Center a reality were also celebrated with mini-receptions throughout the building.

Guests had plenty of opportunity to socialize with alumni, staff, donors, and other friends of the College, while enjoying the gourmet food stations, which included a fresh vegetable-and-dip platter, a build-your-own macaroni cheese stand, and a delectable dessert station.

The event was a resounding success, and a good spirit prevailed among all who came to celebrate Augsburg University’s newest building.

A photograph of the Hagfors Center
The Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business and Religion.

Join us for the Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center Grand Opening this Saturday!

Join the Augsburg community on Saturday, January 27 for the grand opening festivities of the Hagfors Center. The public is welcome to attend the alumni and community open house from 3.30-5 p.m. Enjoy food stations, building tours, and activities.

  • Please allow for extra travel time as we expect extra traffic due to pre-Superbowl activities.
  • Free valet parking will be provided in the roundabout in front of the Hagfors Center on 21st Avenue.
  • Throughout the afternoon, students and faculty will be on hand to provide laboratory tours and to share the transformational difference this new facility makes to their educational experience.
  • Food and refreshments will be available throughout the afternoon including a mac and cheese bar, roasted vegetables and dip, a dessert bar with choke cherry ice cream, meringue and fruit purée, mini lemon tartlets, and more.

For further information please click here.

 

A photo of the Hagfors Center