New Jobs Postings at Augsburg University

Augsburg AAugsburg currently has 25 employment opportunities posted on our online jobs board.

If you are the type of person who would enjoy working in a mission-driven environment and you are looking for an opportunity to become part of a diverse campus community, please apply!

“It’s incredibly exciting, enriching, and rewarding to be a part of the vibrant Augsburg community. The University is a microcosm of all that’s happening across the globe; the stories I hear from alumni, students, and parents never cease to inspire.” — Kevin Vollmers, Director of Leadership Gifts

 

Alumni, parents, and friends of Augsburg are encouraged to consider these openings and to refer candidates who may be a great match.

See what our alumni say about coming back to work for their alma mater:

“Coming back and working for Augsburg is like coming home; it’s a place that is not only familiar but there’s an innate sense of calm and a high comfortableness knowing that you are working for a place that you already believe in, trust in, and feel yourself at.” — Shonna Fulford ’09, Associate Director, Undergraduate Admissions

“The hype is true. Since I’ve started, I’ve had friends reach out to me and ask if the growth and recognition Augsburg is getting is all real. Sure, the campus has changed, but all the changes feel right and good and in service of our students. The opportunities that our students now have are so exciting and it’s gratifying to see Augsburg thriving. It feels authentically Augsburg. Meeting with students even in the limited way that I do, fills me with immense pride.” — Katie (Koch) Code ’01, Director of Alumni and Constituent Relations

“As comfortable as I was on campus as a student, I’m even more comfortable as a staff member because of the progress we’ve made. I’m very proud to be an alumnus and even more so to be a staff member because of the initiatives we take. I get to see those initiatives in action on a daily basis.” — Scott Cooper ’13, Alumni Engagement Manager


All available positions are posted online. Applicants must fill out the online application and submit their resume to be considered for a position. Go to Employment Opportunities to view our most current available positions.

Augsburg University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer We are committed to providing equal employment opportunity to all applicants and employees regardless of their race, creed, color, religion, gender, age, national origin, disability, military service, protected veteran status, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity, transgender status, or any other characteristic protected by federal, state, or local law. If you need a reasonable accommodation to complete our application process, please contact our Human Resources Department at phone number: 612-330-1058 or email: hr@augsburg.edu.

Augsburg’s Sesquicentennial Gala – Join the Waitlist

Update: This event is now sold out. If you are interested in being added to the waitlist, please follow the registration link and add your name. We will let you know as soon as possible if we have ticket(s) available!

Join us for a once-in-a-lifetime event. On Friday, September 27, 2019, we kick off Augsburg’s sesquicentennial with a gala in downtown Minneapolis. This gala will acknowledge our history of pursuing the calling to serve the community, and it will rally our energetic support for the next 150 years of Augsburg University.

During this unprecedented evening, we will share stories of gratitude and hope for the future. We will celebrate with friends who have been a part of the community: alumni, parents, faculty, and staff. We’ll enjoy moments to reflect, share, and give while surrounded by the relationships that have always been at the heart of Augsburg.
We look forward to seeing you there.

—Darcey Engen ’88 and Jeff Swenson ’79
Sesquicentennial Committee co-chairs

Event Details

Friday, September 27, 2019

4:30 p.m. Reception, 6 p.m. Program

Renaissance Minneapolis Hotel, The Depot

225 3rd Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55401

This event will likely sell out. Order today to reserve your place.

Learn more about the Sesquicentennial and subscribe to our calendar.

Celebrate 2019 Augsburg Graduates with the Tassel Challenge

tassel challenge videoAs we celebrate the completion of this academic year and honor the newest class of Auggie graduates, Augsburg is promoting the Tassel Challenge fundraising campaign.

This online giving event supports future Auggies with all proceeds benefiting the Sesquicentennial Scholarship Fund, an endowed scholarship fund at Augsburg.

A donation today in any amount is an investment for Auggie generations to come. Over 200 donors have already contributed more than $110,000 to the Sesquicentennial Scholarship.

The Tassel Challenge is a great way to recognize your favorite graduating Auggie, give back to Augsburg, and help ensure an Augsburg education is accessible to all.

Honor a student special to you and we will make sure they know they were recognized, and send you and the student an Augsburg tassel keychain as a token of our gratitude.

More information can be found and donations made on the Tassel Challenge Donation page. The Tassel Challenge will run from today through May 19. If you have any questions please contact bogen@augsburg.edu.

Important Images Linked to Augsburg’s History

Throughout the month of April, we will be featuring images that are core to the history of Augsburg. These images are featured in “Hold Fast to What is Good” by Professor Phillip Adamo – a book to commemorate Augsburg’s Sesquicentennial looking back from 1869 to today.

Augsburg Shovel
This shovel is so important to Augsburg’s history that it even has a name. Learn more in “Hold Fast to What is Good.”
lectern
This lectern is the oldest piece of furniture on Augsburg’s campus, dating to at least 1916. Augsburg professors still lecture from this lectern, but they also teach in other ways. A deeper history of teaching at Augsburg can be found in “Hold Fast to What is Good.”
newspaper ad
This ad from a Norwegian newspaper enticed Augsburg’s founders to come to America. It’s a fascinating story that can be found in “Hold Fast to What is Good.”
bell
This bell was given to Augsburg at its founding in 1869, but now the bell resides at Augustana University in Sioux Falls. Did they steal it? The story behind this image can be found in “Hold Fast to What is Good.”

 

How to order “Hold Fast to What is Good”

We are accepting preorders of one or more hardcover, limited edition, boxed copies of this book through May 1, 2019.

Price: $162.04 (this price includes tax)

Select the “Hold Fast to What is Good” Book Event to order online today.

Attendees at the Sesquicentennial Gala will be able to pick up their books that evening. Other orders will be delivered by mail in October 2019.

For more information about “Hold Fast to What is Good” by Professor Phillip Adamo, contact Vice President for Advancement Heather Riddle at 612-330-1177 or riddle@augsburg.edu.

What’s Inside Augsburg’s Newest History Book?

Throughout the month of April, we will be featuring images that are core to the history of Augsburg. These images are featured in “Hold Fast to What is Good” by Professor Phillip Adamo – a book to commemorate Augsburg’s Sesquicentennial looking back from 1869 to today.

Cartoon drawing
In 1890, cartoonist Herbjørn Gausta poked fun at Augsburg president Georg Sverdrup, shown here fighting a dragon called St. Olaf College. Read more about the early history of Augsburg in “Hold Fast to What is Good.”
whale bone
There’s a whalebone at Augsburg in the attic of Old Main. That’s right. A whalebone! It’s a fascinating story that can be found in “Hold Fast to What is Good.”
burning effigy of Nixon
In May 1970, Augsburg students set fire to an effigy of President Richard M. Nixon. There’s more to this story that can be found in Augsburg’s newest history book “Hold Fast to What is Good.”
plaque for Communication Center
This plaque hides a secret from Augsburg’s past that is so dark the plaque itself is hidden in a hallway on Augsburg’s campus. The secret can be found in Augsburg’s newest history book “Hold Fast to What is Good.”

How to order “Hold Fast to What is Good”

We are accepting preorders of one or more hardcover, limited edition, boxed copies of this book through May 1, 2019.

Price: $162.04 (this price includes tax)

Select the “Hold Fast to What is Good” Book Event to order online today.

Attendees at the Sesquicentennial Gala will be able to pick up their books that evening. Other orders will be delivered by mail in October 2019.

For more information about “Hold Fast to What is Good” by Professor Phillip Adamo, contact Vice President for Advancement Heather Riddle at 612-330-1177 or riddle@augsburg.edu.

More Than 1000 Alumni and Community Members Gathered for the Aquarium Expo 2019 in the Hagfors Center

If you missed your chance to visit the Aquarium Expo 2019 in the Hagfors Center this year, you can catch the highlights reel here! The Hagfors Center was packed with more than 1000 people on Saturday, March 23. Attendees of this free event enjoyed creative displays of more than 100 aquaria, presentations from local experts, live demonstrations, and a marketplace.

The Augsburg University Biology Department offered a behind-the-scenes tour of the Hagfors Center to small groups. Professor Bill Capman led the tours showcasing the design and function of the state-of-the-art coral reef/marine aquaria he maintains in the lab. Capman also highlighted the up-and-coming marine breeding lab he is currently setting up. Capman shared his thoughts after the event:

“It really seemed like our visitors were enjoying themselves and were impressed by what they were seeing and experiencing, and by the quality of our facilities. It is one thing to do a lot of publicity and draw people in, but it is another thing to have them actually be happy that they came.” – Bill Capman, Associate Professor of Biology

Check out some great footage from the event courtesy of Natural Dental’s Chue Cha:

 

3M’s CFO Nick Gangestad ‘86 Shares Sound Advice for Augsburg Business and Accounting Students

Nick Gangestad talking to students and facultyEarly in his career, 3M’s CFO Nick Gangestad ‘86 created an excel spreadsheet to map out his professional development and possible future jobs. As a planner and an accountant, Gangestad jokes that excel seemed like the only application to use.

Augsburg’s Business Administration Department recently welcomed Gangestad to campus to share with students his advice as they begin their careers. The room was eager to hear about Gangestad’s vocational journey and the steps he found most valuable during his impressive career at 3M. Gangestad encouraged the students to have goals and a plan in mind and to share those goals with their future supervisors. He said there were a number of times in his career when sharing his future hopes opened doors to new and fruitful experiences.

Among the key takeaways from Gangestad’s talk were to establish a personal brand. Gangestad said there were more than 1000 accountants working at 3M back when he was just starting out at the company. He worked to establish a brand that was true to him but also differentiated him.

“I had a brand around being a teacher,” Gangestad said, “and that I could explain concepts to people that most other people couldn’t and I could do it in a way that people could understand.”

Gangestad talks to students and facultyHe told students that it’s important to try to be the first to do something and to think about what you want to be known for. He also encouraged them to take risks. Gangestad has enjoyed the times in his career when he has worked abroad and found value in the challenges and opportunities that made him uncomfortable allowing him to grow as a person.

Gangestad also mentioned the ways in which he has chosen to get involved and give back to his community which includes serving on the Board of Regents at Augsburg.

“The Business Administration Department is very grateful that a man as busy as Nick Gangestad would take so much time to share his extremely impressive vocational journey with our students,” Professor of Economics Jeanne Boeh said after the talk. “Our students left with so many good ideas and strategies for their career moving forward in addition to the important meta message of giving back to the community.”

About Nick Gangestad (from 3M’s Corporate Officer’s page)

Nick Gangestad, 3M’s chief financial officer, grew up on a farm in Iowa intending to pursue a traditional accounting practice. That’s certainly the path he started down, earning a bachelor’s degree in accounting followed by an MBA. But when he was in college, Nick participated in a corporate student program at 3M that started him down a different path. That was almost three decades ago.

“Three aspects of 3M changed my mind,” Nick recalls. “This place operates like a family. I saw opportunities to do it all while working for one company. And I liked how 3M developed people.”

Now, he’s such a big believer in the company that he has a framed copy of the McKnight Principles hanging on his wall at 3M headquarters. William L. McKnight was a longtime 3M CEO whose management philosophy – of allowing room for the kind of experimentation that leads to breakthrough innovations – has shaped the company.

Innovation is clearly appealing to Nick, who was the first student in his high school to buy a computer. He was almost certainly the first student to start his own business, when he began programming videogames and selling them to his classmates. But he also hasn’t wandered too far afield from his first love of accounting.

Nick began at 3M in 1987 as a systems analyst in the company’s finance office. He became a plant accountant a few years later, followed by financial analyst and financial manager roles in various divisions in the U.S., Latin America, and the Asia Pacific regions. In 2003, Nick was named vice president of Finance and Information Technology for 3M Canada. In 2007, Nick returned to Minnesota to direct corporate accounting for the company, followed in 2011 by a new role as corporate controller and chief accounting officer. In 2014, he was named 3M’s chief financial officer.

Outside of work, Nick and his family enjoy sailing, supporting the arts, home renovation, traveling and hosting travelers and – of course – cheering on the Minnesota Twins.

Grab Your Norwegian Sweaters for Velkommen Jul!

Velkommen Jul
Treats abound at the Velkommen Jul buffet.

As we near the holiday season, Co-Chair of the Augsburg Associates Jessica Wahto has a special message to share about an Augsburg favorite tradition:

Remember the days of walking into grandma’s kitchen at the holidays, and the smell of cardamom and sugar wafting through the air. Recall that trip you took to Norway and Sweden. The beauty of the Fjords, the colorful knit sweaters and the delicate embroidery on their bunad’s. Think of your exchange student who visited from Denmark and all the laughs you shared. Enjoy these memories and make new ones at Velkommen Jul!

Please join us and kick off your holiday season at Velkommen Jul on Friday, Nov. 30! Augsburg University’s annual Christmas celebration is open to all. Attend chapel and worship featuring Scandinavian Christmas music at 10:40 a.m. in the Hoversten Chapel. Then head to the Christensen Center at 11 a.m. Here you will find our Velkommen Jul boutique, offering unique Nordic gifts and treats.

After you have claimed your treasured gifts, join us for a festive celebration in Augsburg’s commons with music and traditional costumes and sweaters! Reminisce with friends and make new introductions while enjoying a smorgasbord of Scandinavian treats. Don’t worry; there will be plenty of coffee as well! You can add to the celebration by wearing your Norwegian sweater or Bunad! Velkommen means Welcome, and here at Augsburg you always are! We hope to see you there!

*All proceeds from the boutique as well as donations gathered at the smorgasbord go to help fund student scholarships.

From the Archives: Augsburgians Offer Windows into Cedar-Riverside During the 1970s

police marchingDigital Archives Librarian Stewart Van Cleve shares his thoughts on a robust collection of Augsburg’s archives.

When I started as the Digital Archivist last summer, I was fortunate to inherit a large number of collections that had already been digitized by my predecessor, Bill Wittenbreer. This included a full set of The Augsburgian, Augsburg’s yearbook published from 1916 to 2010. For nearly a century, these yearbooks documented the buildings, faces, and events that stood out each year on campus.

They also reflect the graphic design aesthetics of their period. I particularly enjoy the nordic viking themes from 1930 and the midcentury modernism evident in 1958, but my favorite yearbooks all date from the 1970s. Looking at the covers from 1970 to 1979, you can almost hear the music transform from folk to disco.

group talking to police officerYou can also see how the decade ushered dramatic changes in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood. Beginning with its heady days as the epicenter of the Minneapolis counterculture, Cedar-Riverside transformed with the construction of Riverside Plaza and the unrest that welcomed the development to the neighborhood. It is also interesting to see the histories of familiar places, such as the Lucky Dragon and Hard Times Cafe (once Mama Rosa’s).

To view the entire Augsburgian Collection, click here.

About the Augsburg Archives

The University Archives preserve Augsburg’s legacy and make its historical information available to students, faculty, staff, alumni, and researchers. The archives include information related to the university’s history and provide limited information about administrators, faculty, staff, and alumni.

From the Archives: “One Day in May” Recordings: Digitizing a Crucial Day in Augsburg’s History

Lillian Anthony and Dr. Mary Howard reflect the thoughtful mood of "One Day in May."In 2013, the Augsburg University Archives received fifteen boxes of “reel-to-reel” audio recordings and promptly began an ongoing project to save them. Created from the late 1950s to the early 1980s, these recordings documented everything from commencements and building dedication ceremonies to notable speakers and chapel talks. Lindell Library purchased a refurbished reel-to-reel player and oversaw a student workers’ painstaking inventory of more than 500 tapes in the collection.

“Over the past year, I have supervised a small army of students who have transformed these recordings into a collection of YouTube videos that grows by the day,” said Stewart Van Cleve, digital archives librarian.

Van Cleve shared that some of the most significant and fascinating recordings come from a single day: May 15, 1968. President Oscar Anderson canceled classes on this “One Day in May,” and the Augsburg community listened to leaders of Minneapolis’ black community as they detailed the racism, sexism, economic and geographic segregation, and other problems that continue to affect Minneapolis’ black community.

Of the fifteen original sessions from that day, thirteen recordings have survived. You can listen to those recordings here.

About the Augsburg Archives

The University Archives preserve Augsburg’s legacy and make its historical information available to students, faculty, staff, alumni, and researchers. The archives include information related to the university’s history and provide limited information about administrators, faculty, staff, and alumni.