Muslim Identities in Minnesota

PMuslim Voices MNresentations by Cawo Abdi and Nahid Khan (University of Minnesota)

Moderated by Fardosa Hassan (Augsburg College)

Date & Time: Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 7:00 PM

Admission: free and open to the public

Location: Hoversten Chapel, Foss Center, Augsburg College

In the 21st century there is a plethora of clichés, stereotypes, and over-generalizations about Muslims in Minnesota, where there are also a variety of different ways of being Muslim. In this panel, Professor Abdi and Ph.D. candidate Khan will explore the diversity of Muslims in Minnesota today and the many contexts shaping their lives and identities. Professor Abdi will draw on her recently published book on the Somali diaspora, Elusive Jannah, and Khan will present data from her research on the portrayal of Islam and Muslims in Twin Cities media over the last several decades.  This is the second in a series on Muslim Identities co-sponsored with the Jay Phillips Center for Interfaith Learning at the University of St. Thomas.  The first, “Muslim Identities in North America,” features Professors Meena Sharify-Funk (Wilfred Laurier University) and Nahid Khan, speaking at 7pm, Monday, September 26, in Woulfe Alumni Hall, University of St. Thomas.

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Cawo Abdi

Cawo Abdi is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota and a Research Associate at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Professor Abdi’s research areas are migration, family and gender relations, development, Africa and the Middle East. She has published on these topics in various journals and is the author of a book, “Elusive Jannah: The Somali Diaspora and a Borderless Muslim Identity,” University of Minnesota Press, 2015.

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Nahid Khan

Nahid Khan is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication with a religious studies graduate minor at the University of Minnesota. Khan also serves as special consultant to the Jay Phillips Center for Interfaith Learning at the University of St. Thomas. Active in community interfaith dialogue since the 1980s, with a particular focus on Muslim-Jewish dialogue, she was a Muslim delegate at the North American Interfaith Colloquium held at the Collegeville Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research in 1999 and 2000 and she served for eight years on the board of the Joint Religious Legislative Coalition, an interfaith advocacy group addressing social justice issues in Minnesota.  She is also a trained guide for the Collection in Focus program at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and a board member of Mizna, an Arab-American cultural and arts organization based in the Twin Cities.

Sponsored by the Bernhard Christensen Center for Vocation at Augsburg College in collaboration with the Jay Phillips Center for Interfaith Learning at the University of St. Thomas, as well as the Muslim-Christian Dialogue Center and the Department of Communication and Journalism at the University of St. Thomas.

 

Fall New Faculty Series

New Faculty Dinner with the Provost

Tuesday, September 13, 5:30-7pm*
*RSVP required.

General Ed 3.0 with Jacqueline deVries

Wednesday, October 5, Lindell 301, 4-5pm

What Makes Augsburg Unique with Philip Quanbeck II

Wednesday, November 2, Riverside Room, 11:30am-12:30pm**
**You are welcome to bring your own lunch for this brown bag session.

Learn about more faculty development opportunities through the Center for Teaching and Learning’s Website.

Fall Book Group – America’s Original Sin

CCV Fall Book Group – America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America

UPDATE: The book group is now full, and there are no more free books available.

In connection to the September 20 Bernhard M. Christensen Symposium, faculty and staff are invited to participate in a book group discussion of America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America by Jim Wallis. The group will be co-led by Martha E. Stortz, Bernhard M. Christensen Professor of Religion and Vocation, and David Hamilton, Director of Operations and Global Inclusion, CGEE.

The Book Group will meet for brown bag lunch discussion in the Riverside Room from 11:30am-12:30pm on Sept. 7 and Sept. 28.

To receive a free copy of the book, please be sure the dates work for your schedule. Sign up by emailing ccv@augsburg.edu. Once registered, you may pick up the book in Oren Gateway 106.

Advance Screening – Morgan Freeman’s Story of God

Please join us Wednesday, March 30 from 7pm-8:30pm.

In addition to viewing one episode of the upcoming National Geographic series, there will be a panel discussion featuring Augsburg leaders of different faith traditions: Dr. Phil Quanbeck II, Dr. Maheen Zaman, and Julian Kritz (current Interfaith Scholar). The panel will be moderated by Rev. Mark Hanson, the new executive director of the Christensen Center for Vocation.

Event Schedule:
6:30 P.M. Doors Open
7:00 P.M. Screening Starts
8:00 P.M. Interfaith Panel Discussion with Dr. Phil Quanbeck II, Dr. Maheen Zaman, and Julian Kritz
8:30 P.M. Event Concludes with Light Refreshments in the Foss Atrium

The event is free and open to the public. As space is limited, please register online ahead of time to ensure a spot. Seating is first come, first-served.

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2016 Alternative Spring Break to Laredo

Since 2006, Augsburg College’s Campus Ministry has committed to spring break service. These experiences have led students into unfamiliar territory to serve in a different area, reflect on the impact of the experience (both of their work and of what they learned through the people they encounter), and continue to imagine their own lifelong commitment to service. Past trips include New Orleans, Louisiana; Biloxi, Mississippi, and Laredo, Texas, and Mobile, Alabama. This year, Auggies will return to Laredo to work on building projects with Habitat for Humanity. While working as a team, students will not only serve the community but think about how the experience connects to their own education and neighborhood. Auggies will explore vocational interests while their skills grow.

Registration for the event is open until February 5, and on a first-come, first-served basis (with $100 deposit required). The trip will take place March 12-19, 2016; and the cost is $250—includes transportation, lodging, equipment, and most meals.

To register visit: http://www.augsburg.edu/campusministry/spring-break-2016/ to download the registration form. The form should be turned into Campus Ministry in Foss 104.

Sponsored By: Campus Ministry and Christensen Center for Vocation

“Like” us on facebook! And follow us on twitter @AuggieSpringBrk

 

 

Religion at Augsburg – New Faculty Series

Religion at Augsburg 

Presentation by Pastor Sonja Hagander and Marty Stortz, Professor of Religion

Wednesday, November 11, 12:15-1:15 pm,

Find out how Augsburg’s origins as a seminary in a specific Christian tradition lay the foundations for a rich appreciation of religious and non-religious diversity. All faculty and staff are invited to this next session in the New Faculty Orientation Series brought to you by the Center for Teaching and Learning and the Christensen Center for Vocation.

All are welcome to this brown bag session in the Campus Ministry Seminar Room (Foss 110) – bring your lunch and join us!

Apply to be a 2016 Christensen Vocation Intern

Explore vocation while serving at a faith-based nonprofit

Current Augsburg College Sophomores and Juniors:

  • Are you curious about the idea of being called to serve your neighbors in a work-setting?
  • Wondering about how your talents, skills, and passions can inform your career decision making?
  • Interested in exploring purpose, meaning, and vocation in a practical way?
  • Looking for a paid work/internship experience for Spring Semester 2016?

If yes to all of these, we invite you to apply to be a Christensen Vocation Intern.

Some benefits and responsibilities include:

  • Direct work experience at a faith-based non-profit organization.
  • Students of any major and any faith background can participate.
  • Participate in a bi-weekly seminar with other interns–read, reflect, and share about vocational discernment.
  • Duration: 10-12 weeks, 8-10 hours/week; PAID internship for 100 hours during Spring 2016 semester.
  • Completed Christensen internships can be eligible for the Augsburg Experience.

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Called to Scholarship with Joan Kunz

On October 19, join the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and the Christensen Center for Vocation (CCV) for a time of reflection and recognition of professor Joan Kunz‘s call to scholarship.

The Seasons of a Scholar’s Calling: Reflections at Mid-Career

Monday, October 19
3:45 to 5pm
Marshall Room

Refreshments will be served.

2015 Heritage Day

The 2015 Heritage Day featured presentations by two Augsburg Alumnae:

“BricMandyHeadshot 1ks and Mortar of the Epistle of Straw: Luther and James on Faith and Works.”

Amanda Brobst-Renaud, ‘04

– 2013 MDiv from Luther Seminary
– Current Ph.D. Candidate in Biblical Studies at Baylor University

“Formation osmallerHeadshot Kmahonf Worship in Martin Luther’s Small Catechism.”

Katharine S. Mahon, ’06

– 2010 MTS from Boston College School of Theology and Ministry
– Current Ph.D. Candidate in Liturgical Studies, Liturgical History at the University of Notre Dame

ABOUT OUR ANNUAL HERITAGE DAY

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Interfaith Student Reflection by Joseph Kempf

Joseph Kempf, Class of 2016

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“(And Jesus Said) You are the salt of the earth; but if salt has lost its taste, how can its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything, but is thrown out and trampled under foot.” Matthew 5:13

You are…a people of faith. You are…a city on a hill. You are…the Salt of the Earth. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus calls his followers salt, of all things! Don’t get me wrong, salt is delicious and needed. But we could be something great! We could be legends, we could be a mountain, instead Jesus charges us with salt. While there are numerous interpretations of what exactly is meant by being the Salt of the Earth, I personally hold this verse in the Gospel of Matthew to indicate how followers of Jesus should engage in the world. I am going to do this with a little bit of Chemistry.

I wanted to be scholarly and a little rebellious so I researched what Salt of the Earth even means. According to the Wikipedia page devoted to Matthew 5:13, it reads “Salt itself, Sodium Chloride, is extremely stable and cannot lose its flavor…(then some author notes) Jesus is ‘not giving a chemistry lesson’” I’m almost a little offended. Who are they to decide when chemistry stops. If there is one thing I learned at Augsburg…chemistry never stops. Since Jesus clearly was not teaching chemistry, I think I will step up to the plate so to speak.

I’m sure all of you are familiar enough with cooking. You know with all of your might that oil and water will never mix, no matter how much you stir. Oil is simply too big for water to take on. Long chains of carbons and hydrogens are not attractive to water’s oxygen and hydrogen combo. Maybe for too long, Christians have become oily in practice and deed. We have become too engrossed with our beliefs, what road to heaven or what does this passage actually mean. If water represents the world, sometimes we just sit on top, looking at the world below us but never submerges ourselves. We see our neighbors of various religions, but we may seldom act. What we need is a radical shift in ideas and our approach to other religions. But Jesus doesn’t call us the ‘oil of the earth’ we are the ‘salt of the earth’! You know perfectly well what salt does in water- it breaks apart and fully involves itself in waters affairs. An important thing to note is that the salt is never destroyed in this transaction. Often what holds us back from working or engaging in interfaith dialogue and service is the simple fact that we are afraid of losing our faith. Of changing for the worse or even where to begin. But of course these actions can be learned. WE are called to engage the world and serve our neighbor. How much longer are we going to separate ourselves from this sacred service?

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