Bing tracking

COVID-19: Fall 2020 plans and student resources ›

Justice Jones | Senior Show

OUT OF FORM | JUSTICE JONES

Out of Form is a collection of self-portraits, feelings, and thoughts. It is a direct reflection of Jones’s reality as a multi-racial, bi-sexual, bi-polar, schizophrenic woman.


Slideshow of Artwork (click any picture to enter)


Artist Statement

I’ve always used art to process my experiences and navigate my mental health. I thought my old sketchbooks would give me a definition of self, but I no longer knew the girl who made them. Out Of Form was created as an intentional act of self awareness. I focused on discovering my foundations from childhood through the use of primary colors and basic shapes and lines. I juxtaposed this exploration with figures that change in color, size and shape just as we shift to adapt to our experiences. As I continue moving through the various stages of life, I wonder how much choice we are truly afforded in who we become.

Bio

Justice Jones is an artist, educator and activist completing her final year at Augsburg University as a studio art major. Her passion for learning invites her to explore many different media. Justice practices community space-making, organizing, and activation as a Tactical Urbanism instructor’s assistant at Juxtaposition Arts. She uses foundational elements of fine art to explore and process her experiences and the idea of nature versus nurture as opposed to choice in who we become. Her work on Juxtaposition Arts’ mural team, her business, and Out Of Form, are all informed by these values and beliefs.


 

Emily Duesing | Senior Show

Greater Than Face-Value | Emily Duesing

Greater Than Face-Value is a series of portraits that peel back the layers of each subject’s world with bright colors and graphic elements. The show offers a challenge to encounter those within our influence, including ourselves, with greater vulnerability and empathy.


Slideshow of Artwork

Give your feedback about the show, support an emerging artist.


Artist Statement

My work focuses on human landscapes. The portrayal of the subjects is realistic in form and stylized in color. This examination of the face and head becomes an investigation of human experience and connects to ideas about identity and adversity that exist outside the boundaries of the canvas.

For me, art is an intimate consideration of concepts that I cannot grasp any other way except to visually explore. The act of making becomes a prism to reveal layers of complexity in the subjects. I recognize the only thing I can change in my life is me. When I make art, I fearlessly confront some incongruence within myself. Therefore, my work is autobiographical, and portrait focused.

Emotion, as I experience it, is continually shifting and changing; it is impossible to grasp its totality all at once. I use my art to pull apart the facade that we present to the world and explore the fullness of humanity.  With the color pallet obscuring and revealing emotions, I illustrate what this changing emotional landscape could mean for myself and the viewer.

Bio

Emily is a two-dimensional portrait artist who investigates empathy through painting the figure. She has always had a fascination with the human face and what it can reveal to a viewer. Emily currently lives in Minneapolis and has her Bachelor’s in Fine Art from Augsburg University. Emily is focused on becoming a licensed counselor where she hopes to use art to facilitate healing.  Themes in her work include vulnerability, humanity, and redemption. Emily primarily makes work and her studio apartment or in the Augsburg painting studio. Emily has received several honors and recognitions for her work including the Normandale Purchase Award and Augsburg’s Fine Arts Scholarship, numerous juried shows, as well as a solo exhibition and artist talk at Gallery 720 in Minneapolis.


Virtual Mock-up

Due to COVID-19 the show in the physical gallery space has been delayed. Here is a virtual representation of what it will look like in the Gallery720 space.


 

Danielle Krysa

This Exhibition is currently Postponed due to Covid-19. It will open when possible.

“as she turned tumors into treasures, she couldn’t help but wonder – do goldfish feel this naked?”– Danielle Krysa

Christensen Gallery: 720 22nd Ave S, Mpls, MN


THIS TALK HAS BEEN RESCHEDULE TILL FALL 2020

“How to Stop Being Creative: Excuses, Doubt, and Other Junk”
Talk with Danielle Krysa

Weisman Art Musuem: April 8, 7 p.m.

Reception and book signing following the talk. Books on sale in the WAM Shop. Talk is FREE but reservations required.


Fiona & Leona, Farrah, Fawna & Launa – all of them are feminine, beautiful, and a hot mess.

Eight out of ten women will have to share their bodies with uterine cysts and or fibroids at some point in their lives. I am one of those women. I have spent years battling these ugly lumps that continue to grow inside of me. What to do? Exactly what I did with jealousy when I decided to start my art site, The Jealous Curator – instead of allowing these masses to cause anxiety and upset, I flipped the narrative and have embraced them instead. While I await yet another major surgery, I am choosing to envision them – through portraiture – as beautiful, crystal-covered, pink treasures that I’m currently housing. These abstract portraits are not only made up of paint and found images, but also crystals, random objects from the bottom of jewelry boxes, and piles of vintage costume jewelry. Yes, this will be the most sparkly silver lining possible!

Several of the pieces will be hung in the gallery, with spaces for three more to come. I will be using the gallery as a studio, turning tumors into treasures as people stroll past (or stop to watch) on the other side of the glass. This is the most vulnerable work I’ve done to date, so being in a totally vulnerable situation also seems right. Terrifying, but right.

Bio

Danielle Krysa is a Canadian artist with a BFA in Visual Arts and a post-grad degree in design. Her combination of found imagery and carefully manipulated strokes of paint create an entirely new story. Coupled with the sly jokes that are their titles, Danielle’s works attempt to transform the everyday into something a little more ridiculous. Danielle is also the writer behind the contemporary art site, The Jealous Curator, and the author of “Creative Block”, “Collage”, “Your Inner Critic Is A Big Jerk”, “A Big Important Art Book – Now With Women”, and “A Big Important Artist – A Womanual”.  Her work is held in private collections in Canada, The United States, Europe and Asia.

The Jealous Curator


 

 

THE ILLUSION OF LIFE by KOLE STILLWELL

APRIl 9 – 19, 2018

Christensen Center Student Art Gallery

Artist Talk: Thursday, April 19, 5:30 – 7 p.m. Christensen Center Student Art Gallery

The Illusion of life mixes acrylic paint with digital art, analyzing how storytelling can be the means to better understanding the human condition.

Statement

Famed director, illustrator, animator Hayao Miyazaki suggests ( in the article The idea-the origin of everything) that a story doesn’t truly start with a story being made, it begins with the experiences we have stored up in our lives. “ The stories and original work- even initial project planning-are only triggers.Inspired by that trigger, what rushes forth from inside you is the world you have already drawn inside yourself, the many landscapes you have stored up, the thoughts and feelings that seek expression.”

Kohba merges digital illustration and design to express the emotions that defined the estrangement from my father. The story follows Kohba, A young wolf cub, who in the midst of being deserted by his father, must decide if he will fall into anger or accept the reality of what has come to be. Dealing with themes of abandonment, anger and regret, this body of work uses, color, landscape and character to explore the flaws of the human condition while also showing storytellings significance as a form of expression and communication in society.


THE BATTLE WITHIN by MAXWELL PREUS

FEBRUARY 19 – MARCH 1, 2018

Christensen Center Student Art Gallery

Artist Talk: Thursday, March 1, 5:30 – 7 p.m. Christensen Center Student Art Gallery

The Battle Within is a series of painted and stained wood pallets that portray the artist’s experience with depression. By utilizing sequencing and both the floor and the wall for installation, the work evokes a tonal journey spanning congested darkness to something simpler and calm.

Bio

Maxwell Preus is a current senior at Augsburg University and is twenty-two years old. His senior exhibit delves into themes regarding mental illness and overcoming obstacles. He is interested in portraying the complexities of the human mind and spirit.

Statement

I enjoy sculpting large pieces in clay, typically beginning with a basic idea and then letting the pieces take on a life of their own. I allow the clay to have its freedom because sometimes things shift on you overnight or even break in the kiln. I expect these issues to happen so I don’t let the frustration build but rather try to create something special out of possible imperfections. Kind of like life. Things happen.

This past year I decided to explore another media. Much like the clay, I found an analogy to life in my wood pieces, specifically as to how they developed through my experience with depression. As I began creating projects using wood and paint, I found myself drawn to working with weightier pieces and the emerging images were rather dark. This seemed to coincide with how I was feeling. Upon returning from a semester in Spain, I felt a disturbing sense of hopelessness. Everything in my life was overwhelming. I even considered quitting school as each day was a struggle. Working with heavy materials proved to be centering for me and, figuratively speaking, I could escape what felt like the weight of the world on my shoulders. It was through the creative process that I could peek through the blinders. Gradually the depression lifted and I felt like myself again.

I feel that I went through this difficult time so that I can empathize with those who suffer. I am lucky. I experienced a brief, yet intense, glimpse into the depths of despair that can haunt people for months, years, a lifetime, and I worked to portray this through my art.


images from exhibit

 

CONNECTIONS by TY TOMCZAK

february 5 – 15, 2018

Christensen Center Student Art Gallery

Artist Talk: Thursday, Feb. 15, 5:30 – 7 p.m. Christensen Center Student Art Gallery

Connections is a visual journey into a complex family of eight individuals. By using line work and mixed-media watercolor techniques, Tomczak invites the viewer to connect to the loving family dynamic through an adventure of self-analysis.

Bio

Ty Tomczak is a watercolor painter living in Minneapolis, Minnesota working to receive his BA in Studio Art at Augsburg University. He specializes in portraiture, sceneries, and linework to convey individuality through watercolor paintings.

Statement

My work utilizes the materials of watercolor and food coloring to demonstrate the importance of family bonds. This demonstrates that family is important and would like others to see its importance. I am representing my own family as paintings and cut silhouettes that encircle a mirror. The central mirror reaches out to the viewer by including them in my family and reminds them that who they are isn’t limited by their reflection. Silhouettes respond to humanity’s judgment on appearances and demonstrate that what’s on the outside isn’t what makes a person. I am appealing to what’s on the inside, underneath the surface, because I believe that everyone’s different.

My work aims to represent the whole of a family by breaking down its complexities into parts. This can be seen by my choice to have two sections in my exhibition: a simplified, individual side, and a grouped, less defined side. Its simplified side shows the beauty of how well family knows one another. Its complex side shows how the family works through life as a group. I would like others to understand that family is important to me through both sides of the spectrum and that it is positive to be a part of something.

For me, family has been an encouraging force driving me towards loving who I have become. Through this encouragement, I am drawn to study human identity. This study on human identity relates to my contemporaries by my close analysis to the differences in humans.


Images from exhibit