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You can eat processed meats and red meats, but can you digest cancer?

As a way to further reflect on their experience with Campus Cupboard, polish their communication skills, and explore new topics related to food and sustainability, Campus Cupboard volunteers will be publishing weekly blogs this fall. Check back each week for new musings from the students!

By: Oscar-Martinez-Armenta (’16)

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an intergovernmental agency forming part of the World Health Organization (WHO), recently served us a mouthful. On Monday, October 26, the IARC reported that processed meats and red meats are linked to cancer.

After analyzing 800 scientific studies, the IARC categorized processed meats as a Group 1 Carcinogenic. Under this category, “there is enough evidence to conclude that it can cause cancer in humans.” Red meats were placed in Group 2A, which means that there is probable cause of cancer, but the evidence is inconclusive.

Processed meats are those altered through methods like salting, curing, and fermentation. Bacon, ham, and sausage are prime examples. Eating 50 grams per day of these meats can increase the risk of colorectal cancer by 18%. Continue reading “You can eat processed meats and red meats, but can you digest cancer?”

My Passion for New Adventures

As a way to further reflect on their experience with Campus Cupboard, polish their communication skills, and explore new topics related to food and sustainability, Campus Cupboard volunteers will be publishing weekly blogs this fall. Below, Malia kicks off the “Food and Sustainability Series” by exploring new food adventures. Check back each Monday for new musings from the students!

By Malia Thao (’16)

Living in a big and dynamic world, I have a strong passion to travel across the globe, for new adventures and to learn more about the various cultures out there. Food is always a big part of that learning.

Last semester, I was fortunate enough to studied abroad in two countries: El Salvador for a short term winter break, and South Korea for a semester long. Both of these international experiences were wonderful and awesome learning abroad experiences. The biggest highlight of everything was the authentic foods from these places. One of my favorite foods in El Salvador was Pupusa which is a thick tortilla bread stuffed with a bean paste. On the other side, my favorite food in South Korea was Kimbap and Dakbokki. Kimbap, is a steamed rice wrapped with all kinds of vegetables and Dakbokki is a spicy rice cake stew. Just thinking about these foods makes me really want to go back to visit El Salvador and South Korea. Continue reading “My Passion for New Adventures”

Biodiesel: Fueling an Open Mind

As a way to further reflect on their experience with Campus Cupboard, polish their communication skills, and explore new topics related to food and sustainability, Campus Cupboard volunteers will be publishing weekly blogs this fall. Below, Oscar kicks off the “Food and Sustainability Series” with a topic he has been interested in learning more about. Check back each Monday for new musings from the students!

By Oscar Martinez (’16)

Last year, Minnesota increased the mandate from a 5 percent minimal biodiesel blend (B5) in its diesel fuel supply to B10. The shift occurred because biodiesel has demonstrated substantial reduction in particulate and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As the statue currently reads, Minnesota will be raising to B20 by 2018.

Biodiesel is a renewable, clean-burning substance made from oils and natural fats (e.g., soybean oil, and animal fats) that is reducing dependence of fossil fuels. If I was in the same mindset that I had been in three years ago and listened to these statements, I would be asking why the state is not aiming for higher biodiesel blends. Luckily (or maybe not), playing the scientist in college has opened my mind. Through lecture, lab research, and discussion, I have found that biodiesel and other renewable energy sources are not 100% practical. Continue reading “Biodiesel: Fueling an Open Mind”

Campus Kitchen Summer Update

It’s hard to believe summer is almost over – it feels like it just started for us! With a solid team of interns serving weekly meals, supporting the community garden, revamping our farmer’s markets, and teaching gardening and cooking classes, it was a busy but rewarding summer at the Campus Kitchen. We’re looking forward to keeping this momentum going into the school year… but before that happens, we finally have time to catch our breath and share what we’ve been up to for the past 3 months. Check out our summer updates below!

Food To Share

In addition to serving 60 packaged lunches to seniors in Phillips and Seward each week, we had a few special events at our Friday community dinners at Ebenezer Tower. Rhys led an “Easy Cooking & Eating” discussion with residents to share strategies on no-fuss healthy eating. Many thanks to The Campus Kitchens Project and AARP for sharing the curriculum and supporting these new senior outreach efforts! To celebrate Independence Day, we brought our most festive attire, some July 4th trivia, and pies graciously donated by Perkins Restaurant.

Picture1 Continue reading “Campus Kitchen Summer Update”

Food Waste, Hunger, and You – By Emily Campbell (’17)

Recently, Campus Kitchen students joined peers from across the country at the 2015 Food Waste & Hunger Summit, where we networked, shared insights, learned new ideas, and were honored with a “Going Beyond The Meal” award.  Check out Emily Campbell’s (’17) reflection and call to action below, and stay tuned for more student reflections!

The United States wastes 40 billion pounds of food each year. 40 billion. That statistic is staggering, but it’s even more unsettling knowing that 1 in 6 Americans do not consistently know from where their next meal is coming. Some throw perfectly edible food in the trash while others go hungry. It’s a paradox: in a decade, our landfills will be so full of food and other organic material that we’ll have to start exporting our trash and yet there are still people who are food insecure. I could go on with statistics about hunger and about wasted food, but I’ll cut to the chase: What can we do about it? Continue reading “Food Waste, Hunger, and You – By Emily Campbell (’17)”

Campus Kitchen goes “green” at Brian Coyle Center!

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This semester, Campus Kitchen has been able to resurrect a practice that’s both earth-saving and cost-saving with the youth at Brian Coyle Center. A year ago, an intern created a reusable plate system to use with the youth, but the system (and plates) got lost in transitions through the summer and fall. Now, thanks to a donation from Seward Community Co-op, thoughtful clean-up skills from the youth, and a little extra elbow grease from our current interns and volunteers, re-usable plates have returned!

The youth are back in the habit of saving plates every day, and Campus Kitchen students have been able to use the dishwasher at Brian Coyle to make clean-up efficient and effective. These cheery green plates are now saving about 100 Styrofoam plates from a landfill each week!

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Campus Kitchen Expands Outreach To Seniors

 

CK student leaders deliver senior meals with nutritional information
Sophomore Rhys Dilenschneider and freshman Xochil Martinez delivered a special brochure with nutritional information as part of our initiative to expand outreach to seniors this year.

Every Thursday, Augsburg Campus Kitchen students package and deliver balanced meals to 50 seniors in our community. Thanks to a partnership between The Campus Kitchens Project and the AARP Foundation, we are excited to expand these meal deliveries and offer new programming, including nutrition education and themed community meals, to further combat food insecurity and anti-isolation.

This semester, sophomore Rhys Dilenschneider is leading these Thursday delivery shifts and working on nutrition education opportunities. For our first foray into nutrition education, Rhys created a handout explaining the nutritional components of a pumpkin/yam/chickpea patty that sophomore Hannah Thiry and cooking shift volunteers whipped up especially for seniors. Next on the horizon is a collaborative workshop, where Campus Kitchen leaders and seniors at Ebenezer Tower Apartments can share tips and techniques while learning to cook an easy meal together.

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Sophomore Hannah Thiry and the cooking shift crew prepared vitamin and protein packed pumpkin/yam/chickpea patties especially for our seniors.

One of our newer community partners, Common Bond Communities Seward Tower West, is eager to bring more of their residents into this program. Already, they have 14 residents on a waiting list to receive meals. Because Rhys and the other Campus Kitchen student leaders are on a tight schedule doing deliveries between classes, we are looking for a few more volunteers before we can start serving our neighbors Seward Tower West.

If you’re interested in helping us expand our outreach by volunteering or assisting with nutrition education, contact Allyson at campuskitchen@augsburg.edu. And stay tuned to our facebook page or Twitter for more news from our work with seniors and other neighbors!

Join us in the Augsburg Community Garden this season!

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Whether you’ve been gardening for 50 years or you’ve never touched a seed in your life, we welcome you to join us this season in the Augsburg Community Garden! Since 2008, we have given students, staff, faculty, neighbors, and community organizations an opportunity to learn and grow their own fresh produce. The Augsburg Community Garden has four main goals: to provide a space for the community to come and learn together; beautify the neighborhood and campus; provide growing space for those without it; and to assist gardeners in providing themselves a healthy diet. If you or someone you know would like to be a part of this community this season, visit the Campus Kitchen website to learn more and apply for a plot.

MN Health Corps VISTA position available with Campus Kitchen

The Campus Kitchen and Health Commons at Augsburg are looking for exceptional applications for a shared MN Health Corps VISTA – a full-time position from June 2015-2016. As the second year of a three-year VISTA assignment, this year will build on the work of the previous VISTA in making healthy food and healthcare available to all in and around the Cedar-Riverside. Goals for the year include increasing organizational capacity to provide health services and education, building community participation in the Augsburg Community Garden, and enhancing volunteer engagement with Campus Kitchen and Health Commons. A strong sense of organization, a bit of creativity, and Somali language skills are highly preferred. The priority deadline to apply is Friday, April 3rd, but applicants are encouraged to apply as soon as possible, since interviews are being conducted on a rolling basis (starting immediately) until the position is filled.

Details and application are available here.