2020 Vocation Internship Opportunity

Explore Vocation while Working with a Community-oriented faith-Based nonprofit or congregation

5 images of different students

Current Augsburg Students:

  • Looking for a meaningful work experience for spring semester 2020?
  • Are you curious about how you are called to serve your neighbors?
  • Wondering about how your talents, skills, preferences, and passions can inform your career decision making?
  • Do you have initiative and want to spend time learning and intentionally reflecting on experiences with others?

If yes to all of these, we invite you to apply to be a Christensen Vocation Intern.

APPLY TO BE A CHRISTENSEN VOCATION INTERN THROUGH HANDSHAKE

KEY ELEMENTS OF THE CHRISTENSEN VOCATION INTERNSHIP PROGRAM INCLUDE:

  • Paid Internship at a faith-based nonprofit or community-oriented congregation
  • Gain relevant work experience and mentoring
  • Reflect on experiences and assessments with a cohort of your peers
  • Duration: 8-10 hours/week, PAID internship for up to 100 hours during Spring 2020 semester
  • Current students from all majors and faith backgrounds are welcome to apply. Each site’s job description can be somewhat customized to the intern’s education and goals.

Potential Engagement/Focus Areas:

  • Community organizing
  • Youth and young adults
  • Assisting people experiencing homelessness
  • Interfaith dialogue and learning
  • Environmental justice
  • Anti-racism training/work
  • Multi-media Storytelling 
  • Public art
  • Community meal

Apply through Handshake, Augsburg’s student employment platform.

Questions about the application platform? Ask the Strommen Center for Meaningful Work, careers@augsburg.edu
Questions about the application process or positions? Ask the Christensen Center for Vocation, ccv@augsburg.edu or 612-330-1403

NOTE: Priority application deadline is November 13. Then applications will be accepted on rolling basis as the positions are still available.

The Christensen Vocation Interns will be selected based on initiative and strong interest in exploring vocational discernment with a faith-based organization partner site, as well as the potential match with the available partner sites’ engagement opportunities and needs.

Meet Lonna

Lonna Field head shot Lonna Field serves as Program Associate for the Christensen Center for Vocation (CCV) at Augsburg University. Part of her role includes co-directing the Augsburg Youth Theology Institute, leading the Christensen Vocation Intern program, and supporting other programmatic and assessment development. In the 2019-20 academic year, as the CCV transitions to a new vision and structure, Lonna is specifically helping manage and steward the transition of various programming. This includes continuing to support interfaith initiatives during the launching of the Interfaith at Augsburg: An Institute to Promote Interreligious Leadership.

Lonna has worked at Augsburg University since 2009 with roles through the Lilly Grant, Campus Ministry, the Center for Faith and Learning, and now the CCV. Throughout these 10+ years, she has been deeply impacted through the opportunity to learn, share, and live out Augsburg’s mission with so many unique students, colleagues, and partners.

Lonna’s professional experience has revolved around education and youth development, previously serving as Youth Director and Education Coordinator at Redeemer Center for Life and as a Mentor Coordinator with the Boys and Girls Club at Little Earth of United Tribes. Lonna earned a Master of Arts in Leadership from Augsburg University and a BA from Wartburg College in Elementary Education and Mathematics. A native Iowan, Lonna found a love for the city—especially North Minneapolis!—through her experience in Lutheran Volunteer Corps. 

Beyond Augsburg, you can often find Lonna running, baking, organizing or volunteering at community-oriented events, making music with the Capri Big Band, or playing in various volleyball, kickball, or softball leagues. Lonna enjoys spending quality time with family, friends, and church community, and she is a proud auntie and godmother to family members in Kentucky and Florida. 

Fall Vocation Lunch with Katie Clark

Augsburg Faculty and Staff, the Division of Mission invites you to attend the fall vocation lunch:

Who Gives You Light? 

with Katie Clark, Assistant Professor and Director of Augsburg Central Health Commons

Friday, November 22, 2019
11:15 a.m, – 12:25 p.m.
East Commons, Christensen Center

Faculty & Staff – Register for Vocation Lunch with Katie Clark

Katie Clark with her husband and 3 children

Kathleen ‘Katie’ Clark has been teaching in the Department of Nursing since 2009 and serves as the Director of the Augsburg Central Health Commons (ACHC). Her teaching focuses on issues of social justice, health inequities, and civic engagement.  During her time in the department, Katie has designed various courses in an immersion format that allows students to gain insight first-hand from people living in the margins while learning skills of transcultural nursing as well as teaching in more traditional formats.  In 2011, in partnership with two other local non-profits, Katie launched the Health Commons in Cedar-Riverside. Before coming to Augsburg, Katie worked for eight years as a nurse at University of Minnesota Medical Center – East Bank in both oncology hematology and the medical intensive care unit.  She has traveled to 20 different countries and participated in many local volunteer programs, such as the Bridge for Youth and Higher Ground. Currently, Katie lives with her husband and three children in the town of Stillwater.

EDUCATION

  • D.N.P. in Transcultural Leadership: Augsburg University (2014)
  • M.A.N. with a Transcultural Nursing Emphasis: Augsburg University (2010)
  • B.S.N: University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire (2002)

Please note: Guests are also invited (but not required) to bring a donation of socks or other items to the Health Commons as part of this event. Learn more about items needed (or consider making an online donation) at https://www.augsburg.edu/healthcommons/

The Mission and Identity Vocation Lunch is an event that strengthens the concept of vocation at Augsburg for faculty and staff by providing role models from within the community to share a presentation on their sense of call and life journey.

Introducing our 2019-20 AYTI Ambassador-Grace P

Photo of Grace P sitting at a table laughing

Hi! My name is Grace Porter (pronouns She/Her/Hers), and I am a second year studying Theology and Public Leadership with a concentration in Youth Studies and a Minor in Music here at Augsburg University. It sounds like a lot but it really just means that I love working with kids, my faith, and music! Speaking of my faith, I am currently a student deacon working with Student Ministries on campus and using my love of music in choir and in the campus a cappella group, Convocadence! You might recognize me as mentor Gracie from AYTI 2019; fun fact, I was also a participant in AYTI 2017! If you can’t tell, I love this program, and Augsburg University. I also love musical theater and exploring new places, and I am the annoyingly positive person who can get up with the sun 🙂

Photo of Grace P standing on a bench outside Photo of Grace P standing outside with skyscrapers in the background

Peace in the Middle East: Challenges and Signs of Hope

Join Interfaith at Augsburg for a Brown Bag Lunch discussion with visiting lecturer Munib Younan, retired bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land and former president of the Lutheran World Federation.

Bishop Munib Younan
Bishop Munib Younan

Wednesday, October 2
12:00 P.M. – 1:00 P.m.

Oren Gateway Center, Room 100

Bishop Younan’s parents were Palestinian refugees. His entire life and leadership have been focused on finding a lasting, just solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and building up the civic agency of Palestinian people.

Read Bishop Younan’s full bio online.

Bring your questions, and feel free to bring your own lunch!

Jewish High Holy Day Primer 2019

From: Interfaith@Augsburg and Hillel at Augsburg

Below is a “High Holy Day Primer”-

  1. This is the Jewish High Holy Day season, which runs for the entire lunar month of Tishrei this year from Sunday evening, September 29 -Tuesday, October 30. Though Rosh Hashannah and Yom Kippur are on secular calendars, there is another 9-day holiday called Sukkot, right after Yom Kippur. It is a big harvest celebration.
  2. For college students, being away from home for these holidays can highlight the homesickness and the yearning to be in the nest, and for some, quite the opposite. If you celebrate Christmas, imagine staying on campus while most students return home for the holiday. If you celebrate Ramadan, this season is similar to that month of observance. There is now a Jewish student organization on campus called Hillel and students will try to find places for meals and for services. All synagogues and the University of Minnesota Hillel will welcome students, and we can help connect them.
  3. The second set of holidays, Sukkot, is likely much less observed among our students and faculty, though some students will not go to class on the first and last days of Sukkot. Supplemental reading can be found in Exodus 34:22 and Leviticus 23:42-43 for the biblical source of this holiday).
  4. There is a wide swath of Jewish observance among your Augsburg students, faculty and staff. Some adhere closely to the traditions, so they don’t write or use electricity on these major holidays. Others have very secular experiences, don’t celebrate these at all, or focus mostly on the feasting, not the religious and spiritual aspects of these holidays.
  5. The appropriate greeting for this season is, “Sha-NAH to-VAH”. meaning Happy New Year.
  6. How to be an ally:  All of this is to encourage you to have conversations with your Jewish students and colleagues about their observances. The Jewish students may or may not self-identify, so you may want to invite any Jewish students/faculty to talk with you about what this next month is for them, vis a vis classes. They will likely welcome the questions or the greetings. And you could also move important meetings or events away from Rosh Hashannah and Yom Kippur.  The 2019 dates for these holidays are:

Sunday, September 29, Rosh Hashannah begins at sundown.

Monday, September 30 is the first day of Rosh Hashannah.  Some American Jews celebrate for one day, others for two (we can discuss the lunar calendar another time).

Tuesday, October 1 is the second day of Rosh Hashannah for some Jews.

Tuesday, October 8, Yom Kippur begins an hour before sundown. Yom Kippur ends around 7:30pm Wednesday, October 9.

Sukkot begins at sundown on Sunday, October 13, and the first two days are “Holy Days” where some Jews don’t work, use electricity, engage in commerce. We build a sukkah (booth) and eat most of our meals there for 8 days, even if it rains or snows. The first half of Sukkot ends at an hour after sundown Tuesday, October 15.

Sukkot ends at sundown on either on October 18 or October 20, depending on personal observance. Again, a majority of American Jews do not celebrate this holiday or even know what it’s about.

2019 Christensen Symposium

Headshot photos of Dr. Hamdy and Bishop Younan next to presentation title "Suffering and Hope in the Midst of Conflict"Thursday, October 3
11 AM – 12 PM
Hoversten Chapel, Foss Center

Speakers:

  • Hamdy El-Sawaf, founder and psychotherapist at the Family Counseling Center and imam of Masjid Al-Iman in Minneapolis
  • Munib Younan, retired bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land and former president of the Lutheran World Federation

Hamdy El-Sawaf and Munib Younan will share personal experiences and their religious faith perspectives on hope, reconciliation, and resiliency in the midst of suffering and struggles that often are intensified by religious convictions and differences.

About the Christensen Symposium:

Each year, the Christensen Symposium provides the opportunity to explore and apply the lessons rooted in former Augsburg President Bernhard M. Christensen’s legacy:

  • Christian faith liberates minds and lives.
  • Diversity strengthens vital communities.
  • Interfaith friendships enrich learning.
  • The love of Christ draws us to God.
  • We are called to service in the world.

The 2019 Christensen Symposium is co-sponsored by the Christensen Center for Vocation and the newly created Interfaith at Augsburg: An Institute to Promote Interreligious Leadership.

Note: This session may be audio recorded. If you would like to be alerted as soon as the audio is available, please email ccv@augsburg.edu

For requests related to accommodations at the Symposium, email events@augsburg.edu or call 612-330-1104.

2019-20 Augsburg Interfaith Fellows

We are pleased to announce Augsburg’s Interfaith Fellows for the 2019-20 academic year: Busshō Lahn and Chris Stedman ’08

The Augsburg Interfaith Fellows are charged with deepening and extending Augsburg’s calling to interreligious engagement, preparing students to live and serve in contexts of religious pluralism. Their work is coordinated by the newly created Interfaith at Augsburg: An Institute to Promote Interreligious Leadership and includes participating in classroom and campus discussions and events; working with students named as Interfaith, Christensen, and Sabo scholars; and engaging with Augsburg’s Interfaith Coordinating Committee and various religious groups on campus.

Bussho LahnBusshō Lahn is a Senior Priest at the Minnesota Zen Meditation Center and is on the leadership team of Aslan Institute in Eagan, MN. Busshō came to Zen Buddhism in 1993, was ordained in 2009, and received dharma transmission in 2015. He is a certified spiritual director, connecting with and walking with those who wish to deepen an intentional and contemplative spiritual life. He sees the intimate connection between our deeply held spiritual beliefs and the workings of our day-to-day mind and heart. The connection between spirituality and psychology is the area Bussho loves to explore, as well as encouraging and supporting spiritual lives, regardless of faith tradition.

Bussho is grounded in contemplative spirituality, interfaith experience, addiction recovery, and shadow integration. He is experienced in overseas pilgrimage and retreat facilitation, classroom education, and public speaking on a variety of spiritual subjects. His special interests include Zen ritual and ceremony, poetry, interfaith dialogue, and the works of the great mystics. He lives in Eden Prairie with his wonderful wife Karen.

  • From Bussho –  I wish to keep offering myself as a resource on Zen, Buddhism, meditation, and mindfulness to classes & students in whatever capacity I can. I have a relatively flexible schedule, with normal class/working hours being especially available. I’d love to meet more Auggies!

Chris Stedman 2019Chris Stedman is a humanist community organizer, interfaith activist, and writer living in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He is the author of Faitheist: How an Atheist Found Common Ground with the Religious, “an intimate and deeply affecting portrait… [that] proves [he is] an activist in the truest sense and one to watch” (Booklist, Starred Review). Chris is also the founding executive director of the Humanist Center of Minnesota, a project through which he and a group of researchers at the University of Minnesota are studying the beliefs, practices, and community involvement of the religiously unaffiliated. Formerly the founding executive director of the Yale Humanist Community and a fellow at Yale University, he also worked as a humanist chaplain at Harvard University and a content developer for the Interfaith Youth Core.

Chris has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, PBS, and Fox News, has spoken at hundreds of conferences and universities, and has written for publications including The Guardian, The Atlantic, Pitchfork, BuzzFeed, VICE, The Los Angeles Review of Books, CNN, MSNBC, USA Today, Salon, The Washington Post, and others. Details magazine named him one of “five next-gen gurus who are disrupting religion’s status quo” and Mic called him “the millennial who’s busting every stereotype about atheists.” He is currently finishing work on his next book, IRL: Finding Realness, Meaning, and Belonging in Our Digital Lives (forthcoming from Fortress Press), which examines what it means to be human in the age of social media, and he also writes THREAD, an occasional newsletter exploring the threads that connect online and offline life. Chris holds a summa cum laude B.A. in Religion from Augsburg (with minors in English and Social Welfare) and an M.A. in Religion from Meadville Lombard Theological School at the University of Chicago, for which he was awarded the Billings Prize for Most Outstanding Scholastic Achievement. In 2018 Augsburg selected him for their annual First Decade Award, which recognizes alumni “who have made significant progress in their professional achievements and contributions to the community” ten years after graduating. Learn more at chrisstedmanwriter.com.

  • From Chris – “I’m thrilled to start my third year as an interfaith fellow at Augsburg and can’t wait to continue learning from and with this wonderful community. I especially love visiting classes and engaging in conversation with students about humanism, secular worldviews, interfaith work, and my own undergraduate experience at Augsburg. Please reach out if you have any ideas or questions about ways we might work together.”

To invite the fellows to your speak with your class or connect with your group, please contact ccv@augsburg.edu for their contact information.

Leadership for Interfaith at Augsburg: An Institute to Promote Interreligious Leadership

Rev. Mark S. Hanson headshot

We are pleased to announce Mark Hanson has transitioned from his role as executive director of the Christensen Center for Vocation (CCV) to help develop Augsburg’s new institute to promote interreligious leadership.

Bio for Mark S. Hanson

Serving as the Founding Director of Interfaith at Augsburg: An Institute to Promote Inter-Religious Leadership, Rev. Mark S. Hanson leads Augsburg University’s commitment to interfaith leadership being a core aspect of Augburg’s academic mission. Interfaith leadership presumes knowledge, skills and sensibilities and is embedded in both curricular and co-curricular dimensions of the Augsburg experience. It involves theological education, spiritual engagement, everyday experiences, global education and social action.

Prior to his current appointment, Hanson served as presiding bishop of the ELCA. He was elected to this position by the Churchwide Assembly of the ELCA in August 2001 and was reelected in 2007. In 2003, he was elected to serve, concurrently, as president of the Lutheran World Federation, a position he held until 2010.

Before being elected as ELCA presiding bishop, he served as bishop of the Saint Paul Area Synod (3H). He had been elected to serve a second term in Saint Paul earlier that same year. Prior to being elected synod bishop, he served as pastor of three Minnesota congregations: Prince of Glory Lutheran Church, Minneapolis; Edina (Minnesota) Community Lutheran Church; and University Lutheran Church of Hope in Minneapolis. 

Born in Minneapolis on December 2, 1946, he graduated from Augsburg College with a B.A. in sociology. He was a Rockefeller Fellow at Union Theological Seminary, New York City, and received a Master of Divinity degree there in 1972. He also attended Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota, and was a Merrill Fellow at Harvard Divinity School in 1979. 

In his work as president of the Lutheran World Federation and as presiding bishop of the ELCA, Hanson has traveled widely throughout the world, sharing a confident hope in God’s promises and a vision of the joyful freedom in Christian community and mission. 

Hanson is widely known as a leader with an evangelical passion and imagination who embraces the Christian tradition, the Christian community, and the world with both generous goodwill and thoughtful insight. He has been an articulate advocate for the renewal of the church’s preaching and public voice, for the strengthening of ecumenical and inter-religious relationships, and for reconciliation and justice in society, with attention especially to those who live with poverty and discrimination. 

Hanson has received several honorary degrees, including Doctor of Humane Letters from Augsburg College, Wittenberg University, and Grand View University, Doctor of Humanities from Capital University, Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir-Rhyne College, Wartburg Theological Seminary, Susquehanna University, Wartburg College, and The Academy of Ecumenical Indian Theology and Church Administration.

He is the author of Faithful Yet Changing, the Church in Challenging Times and Faithful and Courageous, Christians in Unsettling Times both from Augsburg Fortress, Publishers. 

Married to Ione (Agrimson), they are the parents of Aaron, Alyssa, Rachel, Ezra, Isaac and Elizabeth, and grandparents to Naomi, Kingston, Sam, Danielle and Sophia. Before moving to Chicago, Ione was the director of social work at Minneapolis and St. Paul Children’s Hospitals.

Interview with AYTI Program Assistant Marty Wyatt, former participant and mentor

Group of students and staff in the chapel, Marty Wyatt is in the middleAYTI Ambassador Ian Heseltine interviewed Marty Wyatt, AYTI Program Assistant, to learn more about the impact of Marty’s participation in Augsburg’s Youth Theology Institute. In 2007, Marty was a youth participant, and he was a mentor in 2008 and 2009. In addition to his role at Augsburg, Marty is pursuing a masters of divinity at Luther Seminary.

Here is Marty’s response: 

Honestly, the week [of Youth Theology Institute] made me want to come to Augsburg for my undergrad. Looking back this is the biggest impact because of how going to Augsburg impacted my life. I would have never met the people I did or experienced the city if I didn’t go to Augsburg, and that started with the Theology Institute. The Institute introduced me to Augsburg’s campus, professors, students, and staff. They seemed to genuinely care about people and the community. It made me want to get to know them better and be a part of this community that cared so deeply for each other.

I think during the week my faith was renewed. High school can be a hard and isolating time for some and the Institute reignited my faith in a powerful way. I learned (or re-learned?) to look for God in everything, from the mundane to the exceptional. The Institute opened a way of thinking about faith differently than I had before. I began to think critically about what I believe and why, which over time led to a deepening of my faith that I wouldn’t have if I didn’t critically examine it first.  Continue reading “Interview with AYTI Program Assistant Marty Wyatt, former participant and mentor”