Augsburg College receives $10 million cash gift to name
Center for Science, Business, and Religion

Faculty at CSBR Announcement

Augsburg faculty applaud at the announcement that the College received a $10 million cash gift for the Center for Science, Business, and Religion. From left are Bridget Robinson-Riegler, professor of psychology; Mike Wentzel, assistant professor of chemistry; and Matt Beckman, assistant professor of biology.

(MINNEAPOLIS) – Augsburg College is honored to announce that it has received a $10 million philanthropic gift to name a new, signature building on campus. This is the second gift of this size in the College’s history.

The donor’s generous cash contribution – which also is a naming-level gift – will support a new academic building that will house a number of the College’s academic programs including biology, business, chemistry, computer science, math, physics, psychology, and religion.

“Succeeding in today’s world requires an ability to thrive in a world that no longer has fixed boundaries,” said Augsburg College President Paul C. Pribbenow. “That is why Augsburg College is building the Center for Science, Business, and Religion – a place that will support every student in their journey of vocational discernment and pursuit of careers in teaching, civic leadership, service to the church, scientific research, law, medicine, privately owned startup companies, and large corporations.”

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Ibrahim Al-Hajiby ’14 discusses activism with PRI

2eda4c6Ibrahim Al-Hajiby ’14 was featured by Public Radio International, a global nonprofit media company, and discussed social activism and his role in raising awareness of the condition of his homeland, Yemen.

Al-Hajiby, who came to Minnesota in 2007 as a high school exchange student, found himself drawn back to the state to attend college.

After hearing about protests in Yemen’s capital to overthrow dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh in 2011, Al-Hajiby organized his own 24-hour protest on the Augsburg campus.

“I felt like I was disconnected from historymaking, so I wanted to do something here in the United States, especially in my college,” Al-Hajiby said.

Today, Al-Hajiby keeps a close watch on what’s happening in Yemen which made him a good source for context on the conflict, prompting the PRI interview.

Read “A Yemeni watches from afar-again-as his country erupts in chaos” on the PRI news site.

Al-Hajiby’s comments also aired through media outlets including:

Harry Boyte discusses student citizenship

Huffington-PostHarry Boyte, senior fellow of the Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College, in his latest Huffington Post article spoke about a national live-streamed conversation titled, “The Changing World of Work – What Should We Ask of Higher Education?”

The conversation, which was organized by Augsburg College and drew support from the American Library Association’s Center for Civic Life, the Service Employees International Union, and other organizations, was focused on how to increase and improve citizenship among college students.

Read “Educating for the work of democracy – the Freedom Spirit then and now,” on the Huffington Post.

Al Jazeera America interviews Augsburg faculty member

AlJazeeraEric Buffalohead, associate professor and chair of American Indian Studies at Augsburg College, was interviewed by Al Jazeera America for an article that was included as part of a series on Native American gangs. Buffalohead said that the role of gangs isn’t that different than the work of the American Indian Movement because both are about “protecting yourself in a culture of violence.” He also reflected on the interactions between gangs from different cultures.

Read, “A Cross to Bear,” on the Al Jazeera America website.

Augsburg College hosts youth wrestling club

Augsburg was featured on a WCCO-TV newscast in the Twin Cities market because the College is the location for the Minneapolis Wrestling Club, a group serving area youth.

Organizer Justin Benjamin said he wanted to establish a worthwhile club that less-fortunate kids could easily join without the worry of fees. Augsburg offered to the group its wrestling venue, which features motivational icons for young wrestlers, including plaques and awards.

Watch the report, “Mpls youth wrestling club drops fees to the mat,” on the WCCO news site to see Augsburg’s facilities.

Joshua Groll ’10 finds success after Augsburg

Minneapolis Star TribuneJoshua Groll ’10 spoke with the Minneapolis Star Tribune about life in the workforce as a recent graduate.

Groll was working for Best Buy when he was recruited by Boston Scientific via LinkedIn, a networking site. Accepting the new position, which Groll said included a higher salary and better benefits, was an easy decision to make.

To read “Minnesota’s economy finally gaining momentum,” visit the Star Tribune site.

Congratulations to Auggies named to the Fall Semester Dean’s List

Dean's ListMore than 900 Augsburg College undergraduate students were named to the 2014 Fall Semester Dean’s List. Students named to the list achieved a grade point average of 3.50 or higher on a 4.00 scale.

2014 Fall Semester Dean’s List PDF

Students who wish to notify their hometown newspapers of their achievement can do so at their discretion.

View the hometown news announcement.

Augsburg earns Carnegie Foundation’s Community Engagement Classification

Carnegie_CEC_digital_seal (1)Augsburg College has received its second Community Engagement Classification from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Institutions are recognized based on evidence of their collaboration with the larger community, which:

  • enriches scholarship, research, and creative activity;
  • enhances curriculum, teaching, and learning;
  • prepares educated, engaged citizens;
  • strengthens democratic values and civic responsibility;
  • addresses critical societal issues; and
  • contributes to the public good.

The Carnegie Foundation’s Classification for Community Engagement is an elective classification. Institutions participate voluntarily by submitting required material as part of an extensive application process. Those materials include but are not limited to a description of the nature and extent of the university’s engagement with the community — local or beyond — plus institutional commitment, its impact on students, staff, and faculty, and an assessment of initiatives geared toward community engagement.

About 8 percent of U.S. degree-granting institutions have earned the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification to date, and Augsburg was one of only eight Minnesota colleges or universities recognized in 2015. Augsburg previously received the Community Engagement Classification in 2008.

The New England Resource Center for Higher Education serves as Carnegie’s administrative partner, and additional information regarding the classification process is available on the NERCHE website.

Pinther and Grewe speak with MinnPost about gender transition

In a recent MinnPost story, Jens Pinther ’15 and Michael Grewe ’12 MSW described ways in which Augsburg College lives out its commitment to intentional diversity in its life and work.

MinnPostGrewe, the College’s director of LGBTQIA Support Services and assistant director of Campus Activities and Orientation, described some of the ways in which he provides support to the LGBTQIA population on campus. Pinther described his experiences with gender transition and the ways his life has changed during his time at Augsburg — and place where he has found support and acceptance. Read, “Jens’ gender: A college senior works through his transformation” to learn more.

Tim Pippert shares expertise from study of community change in North Dakota

FargoForumTim Pippert, associate professor of sociology, was among the first sociologists to visit the Bakken oilfield region in western North Dakota and to research the social effects of the area’s rapid growth. Pippert contributed his expertise to a series of stories by the Forum News Service about sex trafficking in the Bakken, and the articles have been republished by media ranging from the Pioneer Press in St. Paul, Minn., to the Daily Republic in Mitchell, S.D.