This section of the News and Media Services department site tracks stories in print and broadcast media that feature Auggie faculty, students, and staff. The area also is home to material developed for media about College-related programs, events, and more.

Augsburg Mourns Campus Pastor Emeritus Dave Wold

Pastor Dave in a suitPastor Dave speaking at commencementAugsburg Campus Pastor Emeritus Dave Wold passed away on Thursday, April 12. Following is the message sent this morning, Friday, April 13, from Augsburg President Paul C. Pribbenow.

Dear Friends,

It is with great sadness that I share the news that Pastor Dave Wold passed away last night. Pastor Dave served Augsburg for three decades — 1983 until he retired at the end of the 2012-13 academic year — and was named Campus Pastor Emeritus by the Augsburg Board of Regents in recognition for his many contributions to our campus life and faith community.

One of Pastor Dave’s gifts was that he knew everyone’s name. He knew each of us. It’s hard to imagine how he was able to personally connect with so many people, but he did, and the breadth of his pastoral care strengthened and supported generations of Auggies. He touched thousands of lives and is beloved by alumni and Augsburg community members around the world.

Pastor Dave was also quick witted and loved to craft words and music. I’m sure everyone who knew him can recall how he loved to share jokes as a way of engaging with people. He lent those talents for words and music to the leadership of our Advent Vespers services over the years. He also wrote hundreds of light-hearted parodies, using familiar tunes as a unique means of sharing messages about faith.

Of course, we all know Pastor Dave’s passion for athletics and for working with young people. He was director of youth ministries for the American Lutheran Church (prior to the formation of the ELCA), founded the Holy Hoops congregational basketball league, and supervised many intern pastors. And, while the number of athletic games and matches he announced may not be known, our memory of his distinct announcer voice will not fade.

Our prayers and sympathies go out to Cathy Wold, Dave’s wife, and his family. Pastor Dave was a fiercely committed husband, father, and grandfather. We will share information about memorial services once those plans are confirmed. This morning, those on campus are invited to gather in Hoversten Chapel following our daily chapel service (10:55 a.m.), for a brief time of remembrance, prayer, and song.

I was honored to work with Pastor Dave for seven years, to sing with him before many an athletic contest, and to have him as my pastor on campus.  I join Dave’s many friends and colleagues in mourning his death and the loss of a good and faithful servant.

Faithfully yours,

Paul

 

Moody’s revises Augsburg University’s outlook to stable and affirms Baa3 credit rating

Moody’s Investor Service today revised Augsburg University’s outlook to stable from negative and affirmed the University’s Baa3 credit rating.

Moody’s cited Augsburg’s improved liquidity, effective fiscal oversight, successful fundraising, diverse program offerings, and urban Twin Cities location as strengths supporting its credit opinion. The report also noted that Augsburg continues to operate in a highly competitive student market and has moderately high debt relative to cash and investments.

“This favorable outcome is a great accomplishment, and one we’ve worked hard to achieve,” said Augsburg President Paul C. Pribbenow. “It’s a reflection of Augsburg’s competitive strengths — including our distinct market identity and diverse enrollment — as well as our intentional, sustained efforts driving dramatic improvements in liquidity.”

See the April 5, 2018 Moody’s news release.

News reports: Augsburg professor challenges Economist ranking Minneapolis third most expensive in North America

 

Jeanne Boeh talks to Kare11
Jeanne Boeh talks with Kare11

When The Economist named Minneapolis the third most expensive city to live in North America, just after New York and Los Angeles, reporters from Kare11, Fox 9, and WCCO turned to Augsburg University Professor of Economics Jeanne Boeh for answers. Kare 11’s Gordon Severson questioned the ranking, given that the latest U.S. Census data listed Minneapolis as the 46th most populated city. The Economist study analyzed 150 items such as food, utility bills, rent, and private schools, but left out the cost of owning a home.

Boeh, also chair of the Business Administration department at Augsburg, argues that the study isn’t exactly accurate. “It doesn’t really reflect the average experience of the people who are living here right now,” Boeh tells Kare 11. “If I go to San Francisco, which technically we’re supposed to be more expensive than, the average cost of a house is well over half a million dollars. So, it doesn’t really make sense that Minneapolis would cost more to live in.”

While the study’s measures may be more applicable for high-end executives who travel internationally, Boeh says it’s not an accurate representation when it comes to the average Minnesotan.

See full story on the Kare 11 website.

Related articles: WCCO, Fox 9

See full report from The Economist on The Economist website.

Augsburg’s Board of Regents honored for leadership

The Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges logo

Augsburg’s Board of Regents was awarded the 2017 John W. Nason Award for Board Leadership for efforts including initiating an inclusive, five-year strategic planning effort and leading the institution’s largest-ever capital campaign. The formal recognition is to come in April at the Association of Governing Board of Universities and Colleges National Conference on Trusteeship held in San Francisco. This year’s honorees were chosen from about 40 nominations nationwide.

“Traditionally, governing boards have stayed out of the public eye except when something goes wrong,” said Richard Legon, president of the association’s board of directors. “But it is important that we honor the best of us, and inspire good governance practices in others. These boards’ stories represent some of the sharpest and most innovative thinking in the sector.”

Now in its third year, the award is named for higher education leader John W. Nason, recognizing his work as chair of the National Japanese American Student Relocation Council in helping more than 4,000 interned students continue their college studies across the U.S. during World War II.

Learn more about the award on the Association of Governing Board of Universities and Colleges website.

President Paul C. Pribbenow appointed to Governor’s Workforce Development Board

Minnesota Governor’s Workforce Development Board logoMinnesota Gov. Mark Dayton has appointed Augsburg University President Paul C. Pribbenow to a three-year term on the Governor’s Workforce Development Board. The board represents key leaders from business, education, labor, community-based organizations, and government to advise the governor on Minnesota’s workforce system.

“I’m proud to represent the state’s private higher education sector as a member of this board,” said Pribbenow, “and to have Augsburg engaged in an integrated effort linking government, employers, education, workforce centers, and employees to sustain a vibrant and equitable Minnesota economy.”

The board, which meets quarterly, analyzes and recommends workforce development policies to the governor and the Minnesota legislature to ensure a globally competitive labor pool for the state.

Learn more about the Governor’s Workforce Development Board on their website.

 

Star Tribune interviews finance professor Marc McIntosh about new Hagfors Center

Marc McIntosh, Finance professor

In a recent Star Tribune article, reporter Neal St. Anthony spoke with Marc McIntosh, professor of Finance at Augsburg University, about the new home for the business department at the Norman and Evangeline Hagfors Center for Science, Business, and Religion.

“It brings alive the course materials,” McIntosh said about the building’s state-of-the art technology. “This building is not just about studying stock-and-bond markets. … We’re active, including working with small business owners from Somalia and Ethiopia. We also work in the area of financial literacy. And also what really separates us is our diversity.”

The article also highlighted other attributes of Augsburg. “The university is best known for its inner-city location, solid academics and presidential recognition for community service; to say nothing of its MIAC-championship basketball team playing in the NCAA Division III tournament this weekend,” St. Anthony wrote.

 

Read full article on the Star Tribune website.

Augsburg named a top producer of U.S. Fulbright students

Fullbright logo

This February, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs included Augsburg University on the list of U.S. colleges and universities that produced the most 2017-2018 Fulbright U.S. students, ranking No. 9 among 22 master’s institutions. Top-producing institutions are highlighted annually in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Since 2007, Augsburg University has had 21 Fulbright students selected for their academic merit and leadership potential.

Visit the The Chronicle of Higher Education website to see full list of top producers.

MinnPost features “African-Americans and the Commonwealth of Freedom” by Augsburg’s Harry Boyte

Frances Harper
Frances Harper by Wikimedia Commons

In a recent MinnPost article, Harry Boyte said that commonwealth was a way for ordinary citizens to develop authority for their claims to equality. The commonwealth vision of civic construction made possible the creation of churches, schools and colleges, women’s organizations like the Council of Negro Women and labor groups like the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, Boyte said.

“In a time of eroding faith in democracy and looming threats to the commons, from schools, colleges, and libraries to water resources, coastal areas, and public parks, remembering the commonwealth and the tasks of civic repair can generate the hope we need,” said Boyte, in the article. “The commonwealth vision makes democracy a way of life, not simply a trip to the ballot box, and puts citizens back in as its agents and architects.”

Boyte is a Senior Scholar in Public Work Philosophy at the Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg University. He is the architect of the center’s public work approach to civic engagement and democracy, and the creator of Public Achievement.

In the 1960s, he worked for the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., as a field secretary with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference during the Civil Rights Movement, where he learned about the commonwealth and the claims from civic construction.

Read full article on the MinnPost website

Interfaith Touchdown: The Super Bowl Host Committee shoots video at Augsburg University to help end homelessness, featuring 30 religious leaders

Religious leaders
Photo: Elizabeth Flores, Star Tribune

Clergy leaders from around Minneapolis gathered at the Augsburg University athletic field to film a football-themed video hosted by the Minnesota Super Bowl Host Committee. The purpose is to raise funds and awareness to end homelessness through the Emergency Rental Assistance Program, and to promote unity across faiths, races and politics.

“With the world’s gaze on Minneapolis because of the upcoming Super Bowl, it was important for leaders to take a strong stand” said Pastor David Shinn

Former Vikings star was present to give orders to the team of interfaith clergy leaders. “Today is a little different… One heart. One mind. One spirit,” explained Greg Coleman.

“And do a line of scrimmage with the Catholics and the Protestants and the Rabbis and Imams and the Hindus and the Unitarians all on the same team, pulling in the same direction, working on the same goal – all working to prevent homelessness. Something is happening in the interfaith community here that is pretty unique in our nation and it will be something our country and world needs – how we bridge these differences and our traditions. We had a common cause and football and the image of the field and diverse team really clicked with everybody all these traditions on the same team.” said Tim Hart-Andersen of Westminster Presbyterian Church in Downtown Minneapolis.

Read the full article on the Kare 11 website Related articles: Star Tribune

See photos from the video shoot on the Star Tribune website

Adjunct Faculty, Leah Phifer, Appears on the Cover of TIME Magazine Among Other Women Running For Office

Cover of TIME magazine
Photo-illustration by Sean McCabe for TIME. Photos courtesy of the subjects or shot for TIME.

“The Avengers: First They Marched, Now They’re Running,” reads the headline across the cover. This year, a record number of women are running for office, and among them is Leah Phifer, adjunct faculty at Augsburg University, where she teaches Politics and Policy of Immigration, Introduction to American Government and Political Methodology.

Pifer is running for the DFL nomination for the 8th district seat of the U.S. House. Leah has served Minnesotans through her work at the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Homeland Security and has also worked for the FBI, enforcing laws written in the name of national security.

“Of course, electing more women in Congress would not necessarily lead to an instant federal paid-family-leave plan or national child care. Female lawmakers of both parties tend to elevate issues that men ignore.” states Charlotte Altar, the author of the TIME magazine article. “Women have a long way to go to get to parity in American politics. They hold less than 20% of seats in Congress, just 25% of those in state legislatures and only six of the nation’s 50 governorships.” adds Altar.

Leah’s picture is just below the “T” in “The Avengers.” Part of the word “First” is directly over her hair. This appears in the January 29, 2018 issue of TIME.

Read full article on the TIME website